If you think the words “orgasm” and “birth” don’t belong anywhere near each other in the same sentence, I would have to say I completely agree with you. Science, however, would disagree with both of us, because orgasmic birth definitely, 100%, without-a-doubt exists — but what is an orgasmic birth?

And you could say it’s a beautiful thing.

I mean, think about it: some women are able to experience what is arguably one of the worst “natural” pains known to the human race and instead of screaming, panting, or crying their way through it, they are able to experience pleasure? It’s astonishing, really. Most of us are content to just take away some of the pain from birth, let alone actually feel anything resembling joy or pleasure during the experience.

For a long time, the phenomenon of an orgasmic birth was shrouded in secrecy, like it was a shameful occurrence, one that should be left in the world of women and birth and blood and babies. Surely no “normal” mother would get pleasure from giving birth, right? Surely there has to be something wrong with that? An orgasmic birth is unsettling in a lot of ways because 1) we still think of women’s sexuality as a shameful thing to begin with, let alone during something as sacred as birth and 2) the majority of individuals who give birth definitely do not come anywhere near feeling pleasure during the delivery.

OK, so what is an orgasmic birth?

But the truth about orgasmic births is coming more into the limelight thanks to things like the “Orgasmic Birth: The Best Kept Secret” documentary and more women coming forward (did not intend for that to be a pun, but hey, whatever works) to share their own stories of having an orgasm during birth.

For example, Debra Pascali-Bonaro, a doula and childbirth educator herself for over 30 years, was never put off by the idea of a woman orgasming during birth and when it actually happened to her during her third baby’s delivery, she was thrilled.