Krispy Kreme Doughnuts

(ABDESIGN/iStockPhoto) 

Somewhere in California, a grown man is suing Krispy Kreme for $5 million on the grounds that he thought the doughnuts would be full of healthful vitamins, but they weren’t, because they’re doughnuts.

According to the Winston-Salem Journal, a man filed his lawsuit at the beginning of November citing 10 alleged points of wrongdoing and false advertising on the part of the doughnut chain because its raspberry flavored doughnuts do not contain real fruit and thus do not have the vitamins he thought he was getting when he … ate a box of doughnuts.

Somewhere out there, this guy’s mom is still hiding carrots in his macaroni and cheese. One would hope that by the time our kids are grown-ups they’d know enough to read a nutrition label, but that skill is actually less common than one might think. Even if a nutrition label confuses some people, it seems reasonable for an adult to at least to know that doughnuts don’t count as fruit, even if they’re filled with raspberry jelly.

The lawsuit asserts that the man purchased Krispy Kreme’s chocolate iced raspberry filled, glazed raspberry filled, maple iced glazed doughuts, and glazed blueberry cake because raspberries and blueberries “are a rich source of Vitamin C, Vitamin K, potassium and dietary fiber … and help fight against cancer, heart and circulatory disease, and age-related decline.”

For the record, this is what raspberries look like:

Raspberries on white background

 (AbbieImages/iStockPhoto)

This is what doughnuts look like:

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(Facebook/Krispy Kreme Doughnuts)

A lot of people have probably eaten things they thought were more healthful than they were. Most of those people just go, “Oh shoot. I didn’t realize quiche lorraine wasn’t diet food. Well, I won’t do that again!”

The plaintiff says the Krispy Kreme stores do not provide ingredient lists for their doughnuts, and thus he was duped into buying doughnuts that he thought contained raspberries, but which did not. The Krispy Kreme website does list nutrition information and ingredients lists for all their doughnuts, including the chocolate-iced raspberry-filled variety cited by the plaintiff, and that does list red raspberries as an ingredient in the doughnut filling. Not a lot, of course, the filling is mostly water, corn syrup, and sugar, but it looks like the raspberries are in there. Heck, at 10% of a daily recommended amount of vitamin C and 8% of the daily recommended amount of iron, the doughnut is actually more nutritious than I would have expected from a chocolate-covered jelly doughnut. But still, it is not health food.

The lawsuit is reportedly looking to become a class action case on the grounds that other people also must have bought the doughnuts thinking they would be full of vitamins. One would hope that wouldn’t be a lot of people, but we do live in a world in which parents sued Nutella for not being a healthy breakfast, and another group of moms sued Welch’s Fruit Snacks for being, well, fruit snacks. This guy will probably have people lining up to join him.