Imagine walking out your front door and finding a frozen iguana on your sidewalk. Horrifying, right? That is exactly what is happening in Florida! Iguanas are falling out of trees all over the state! The east coast is currently going through a cold snap, dropping temperatures everywhere, including warm and sunny Florida. South Florida has reported temperatures below 40 degrees. While this is just an inconvenience for most humans, it can be harming for some of the wildlife.

The Green Iguana, a cold-blooded reptile, is one of the victims of this unusual cold snap. The critters so cold, they literally can’t move. They are lying helplessly on the ground, waiting to thaw.

“Don’t assume that they’re dead,” said Kristin Sommers of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commision. “It’s too cold for them to move.”

The frozen reptiles have been found on sidewalks, on roadsides, and even near a few pools. CBS News is reporting that the creatures are likely to thaw out if they are moved to the sun. So, if you feel bad for the critters, then feel free to move them. However, they will probably bite you when they wake up.

However, before you get too upset at the thought of an iguana-cicle, they are actually an invasive species. The Green Iguana is actually a native of Central and South America. They were brought to Florida and have exploded without any natural predators. What’s more, they usually eat through your plants, dig holes in your yard, and undermine the infrastructure of buildings and roads.

Thanks, Iguana.

“This provides an opportunity to capture some,” says Sommers. “In most cases, they’re going to warm back up and move around again, unless they’re euthanized.”

To save an Iguana, or not to save an Iguana? That is the question Floridians have to ask themselves. Another animal affected by the cold does need saving. Sea Turtles are stiffening up in the cold too. Most end up floating aimlessly on the water near the shore. The wildlife commission is rescuing turtles. So, if you see one, be sure to help it out a bit.

What would you do if you found an iguana-cicle?

(Image: Twitter / @MazineBentzel)