When it comes to feeding a baby, I’m a firm believer in fed is best. After all, we want to be sure our babies are and grow up to be healthy and happy. But who exactly gets to make this call? And how? Mothers (and other parents who are able to lactate) will often opt to breastfeed, which is a wonderful option if you’re willing. We all know the high benefits of breast milk. But what happens when a baby is forced to use formula due to what a judge considers to be “inconvenience” to the father? That’s what’s at the center of this next story about.

According to CafeMom, 27-year-old Amber Brown is currently experiencing a custody battle nightmare with her ex, Corey Donta Lewis. The two separated just shortly after Brown gave birth to their baby, and now, six months later, they’re torn on how to feed the baby. Brown has been exclusively breastfeeding the baby and wishes to continue to do so. Lewis wants to feed the baby formula on nights the baby stays with him.

Why Would a Baby Be Forced to Use Formula?

A judge in Charles County Maryland wound up siding with Lewis in this case, due to the fact that Brown can’t pump enough milk for a full overnight visit. But Brown has even had her child’s pediatrician confirm that the six month old can’t tolerate formula properly, reaffirming that in Brown’s case, the baby should continue to be formula fed. So it seems that this judge does not seem to understand that while Lewis may want to have the baby overnight, it’s the child’s needs that should be placed first.

The Washington Post got hold of an affidavit from Brown’s Lawyer, which read the following:

“The magistrate stated pointedly that breast-feeding is not a reason to prevent

[Lewis’s]

visitation, and that insisting on breast-feeding would be considered deliberate alienation of

[Lewis]

.”

But this is pretty bogus. Brown didn’t say she would not allow the baby to see their dad. Alternative measures could be taken in order to ensure the baby continue to be exclusively breastfed. The father and mother could co-habitate on evenings that Lewis has the baby, when the mother could still feed her child. Or Lewis could simply wait until the child is over for full overnight visits, and he could do what’s best for his child and see them on other occasions.

Brown has since filed for an exception with the courts and has also called them out for their obviously false assumption that “breast-feeding is used to alienate fathers.” There’s definitely something wrong when the courts decide in favor of what’s easiest for the father than what’s best for the baby.

According to the Washington Post, Brown’s next court date is in October. She’ll be breastfeeding exclusively till then.

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(Image: iStock / Pilin_Petunyia)