• Fri, May 2 - 3:30 pm ET

9 Work At Home Jobs That Are Actually Legit

legit-work-at-home-jobsWe’ve already established that there are a number of scammy “jobs” that try to hook stay at home parents with promises of fat stacks or “total flexibility!” where all you have to do is pay four easy installments of $99.99 or sell stuff to your friends for a sad commission. But what about the good stuff?

Believe it or not, there are legitimate telecommuting jobs that let you work from home, and pay you actual money as opposed to internet funbuxx. They are just a pain to source. So, because I love you all so much, I found some that I know are legit; either because I’ve done them myself or know someone who has.

1. Customer Service Jobs

legit-work-at-home-jobs

If you have the stomach for it, there are actually quite a few customer service jobs that offer a decent wage and no start up costs as long as you already have a computer, internet, and usually a land line. Starwood, for instance, has legitimate call center careers. The obvious downside to a CSR job is that if your kids aren’t in school yet, it can be tough to work on the phone. Fortunately, companies like Apple offer chat or email-based work if that’s more your thing. Also, you’ll have to watch out for wonky hours, as some of the shifts are graveyard.

2. Errand Running

If you just want to earn a little extra money here and there, sites like TaskRabbit might be what you’re looking for. Basically you go on to the site, register, and complete a background check, and then you can bid on tasks or errands in your area. Some are total junk, but there’s quite a few good ones that you can do while you’re out anyway, like picking up someone’s dry cleaning or delivering coffee. Postmates works the same way, only instead of bidding it’s first come, first served, and it’s limited to courier services only–so no housecleaning or dog walking. The downside here is that you’ll be driving around, not technically “at home”, and both services are only available in certain cities.

3. Freelancing

Ah, the wonderful world of freelancing. It is a decidedly tough thing to break into, but once you have there are opportunities available for everything from writing and graphic design to voice over work and app development. When you’re first starting out, you might want to hit up sites like Elance or Odesk so you can vet your potential clients. Just know that you will have to sift through a whole lot of crappy jobs first, and that both sites take a chunk of your earnings.

4. Community Management

I loved doing community management. A community manager’s job ranges from monitoring forums to handling social media platforms, and it’s way less boring than taking tickets all day. Companies like Metaverse Mod Squad can hook you up with social media and forum moderation jobs that you can do from home. They also have CSR jobs that start at about eight dollars an hour, and social media manager posts that run up to $16.

5. Virtual Assistant Work

Not all virtual assistant jobs are legit, so make sure you do your research. There are some that definitely are, though, including Zirtual, where you can work from home at $12 an hour and get benefits. They have part time work available too for less pay, and you must have at least one year of college education.

6. Online Tutoring or Teaching

Again, there are a few tutoring companies out there that masquerade as legit but actually suck. The fact is, any legit tutoring or teaching company, like Aim4A, or k12 want people who are already certified to teach which is why they offer decent compensation and sometimes benefits.

7. Sell A Course

If you aren’t qualified to teach an academic subject, but know everything there is to know about something else–like how to make your own baby food, kid’s yoga, or underwater basketweaving, you can sell that online. Some platforms are better than others, and it all depends on what you’re looking for. Skillshare, for instance, will let you upload a class for free but take a 12% commission, which is actually pretty reasonable. They are also pretty discerning about what they post, so make sure you know your subject in and out.

8. Test Scorer

I’m not going to lie to you. Working as a test scorer is incredibly dull. Soul crushingly, mind-numbingly dull. Still, if you’re qualified, the pay is pretty decent, and companies like ETS and Pearson pay pretty well per project, anywhere from $10 to $20 an hour. As a bonus, they take taxes out before they pay you, which is a huge plus for WAHMs.

9. All This Other Stuff:

Not every work at home job falls neatly into a category, and there are actually quite a few businesses that have openings for everything from Project Management to Human Resources, and have the added benefit of being full-time positions with benefits and training. The downside, of course, is that for the most part, these are not entry level jobs.

You’ll have a lot less flexibility, and your employer will expect you to stay in contact all day, just like you would in an office. Airbnb, Salesforce, and Autodesk,  all have legitimate jobs that you can do from home.

Basically, working at home comes down to this: if someone promises you a fun, flexible, easy job that will make you lots and lots of money, they are lying to you straight out of their lying mouth hole.

The legitimate, decent paying stuff usually requires education and experience, and it is extremely unlikely that you will ever become rich working at home. Additionally, there is a lot of competition for the good stuff, so chances are slim that you’ll find something right away.

The fact is, working from home is not a walk in the park. You’ll often work weird hours, end up paying for child care anyway, or feel bad for ignoring your family. That’s not to say there isn’t good stuff, though. For instance, pants are mostly optional. There’s benefits and drawbacks–just like working out of the home and momming full-time. Anyone who says otherwise is probably trying to sell you something.

(Image: spotmatik/Shutterstock)

You can reach this post's author, Theresa Edwards, on twitter.
Share This Post:
  • Bethany Ramos

    Great post!! You and I are #3 success stories, and I can confirm that freelancing is one of the hardest and most rewarding things that you will ever do. I personally love telecommuting, but it is not easy.

    • Kay_Sue

      I’m eyeballing #4. I’ve been talking about going back to work…it’d be nice to do that from home.

    • Bethany Ramos

      That would be fun, I’ve never done it! I really do love working from home – BUT I am a strict boss to myself, so that sucks. ;)

    • Kay_Sue

      I hate wearing pants, so…working from home would have certain benefits.

    • Butt Trophy Recipient

      Can I come over?

    • Kay_Sue

      Hey, you don’t know, I could be into long denim skirts like some Reality TV family we all know. Might not be as fun as it sounds.

    • Butt Trophy Recipient

      Tease! >:(

    • https://twitter.com/FaintlyXMacabre Theresa Edwards

      Community Management is pretty awesome. Also, MMS works with game studios and stuff if that’s what you’re in to.

    • BW2

      Bethany, you have mentioned that you work full time from home. Out of curiosity, how much if this is for Mommyish? Is your other time spent on the coffee business or do you write for other sites as well?

    • Bethany Ramos

      I work full-time as a health editor for a company in the UK and also daily for Mommyish. I still freelance for some clients, so I keep busy. :) My husband and I own an e-commerce coffee site, but it has dropped in traffic, so it more so just supports itself without much profit, for the moment.

    • BW2

      Wow, so you have a full time job and Monmyish is on top of this, which I would think takes several hours a day since you write so much. You should write more about how you are managing to do so much work efficiently and parenting two very young kids.

    • Bethany Ramos

      Thanks – that’s a great idea for future posts, and it is not easy all the time. ;) My husband is at home working too, which helps so much, but when the kids are sick and miss daycare (the past month), it is a NIGHTMARE!

    • http://fakegeekmom.com Aimee Ogden

      BETHANYYYY I signed up for Elance after you mentioned it in the comments of an article earlier this week, and wrote/got paid for my first job today! And it looks like it is shaping up to be a small regular gig! I am actually so excited to be able to take on a small amount of work and feel like a (marginally) productive member of society while still being able to be at home with the kidlets that I’m crying. (#aimeeissoemotional) So thank you so much for putting that idea out there!

    • Bethany Ramos

      SHUT UP – I am soooooo happy for you!!! That is amazing! I worked with some nuts, of course, but I overall have loved Elance. Good for you! It helps SO much when you are home with kids too.

      Are you writing? Email me if you ever have questions :) bethany4goodhealth @ gmail.com

    • http://fakegeekmom.com Aimee Ogden

      I am indeed writing, and you are too nice!! I may be bothering you soon, especially if I turn up a lot of nuts. :)

    • Bethany Ramos

      That’s awesome! I have many good and bad stories to share :)

    • kirsten863

      my Aunty Eva recently got a nice 12 month
      old Audi allroad Wagon by working off of a macbook… look at this site F­i­s­c­a­l­P­o­s­t­.­ℂ­o­m

    • Valerie

      Omgggg write to her! And then she can pass you off to me because I’m wanting to do this too. :-)

    • Bethany Ramos

      Add to the circle!

    • https://twitter.com/FaintlyXMacabre Theresa Edwards

      Bethany is a freelance shaman.

    • WriterLady

      One great way to break into freelance writing is to look into educational publishing. While writing and substantive content editing often require specialized degrees and years of in-house experience, copyediting and proofreading don’t necessarily follow the same protocol. Many publishers or vendors (and particularly vendors–companies that outsource work to major publishers) will post openings on their websites for freelance gigs. You may have to take a test, but if you have good writing skills, it is a definite possibility. :)

  • Charliebug

    You forgot to mention transcription (medical or legal). This is what I do for a living from home. It does require a training course but the work is there!

    • Bethany Ramos

      Is the income good, if you don’t mind my asking? I have sooooo many friends ask about WAH who may not want to write, like I do.

    • Charliebug

      The medical stuff can be a bit of a slow go to make good money off the bat because of the time it takes to look up procedures, drug names, etc. but there is potential to make $10-$20 an hour. Right now I do mostly police reports (interviews with witnesses, victims, accused) and that definitely pays the bills. I average around $15-$20/hr.

    • Bethany Ramos

      That’s great!

    • Jessifer

      Also closed captioning or subtitling, which I used to do. We were not allowed to work from home because we did a lot of TV series/movies/commercials that were not out yet, so I think they may have been concerned about having the materials leaked… but I’m quite sure that under the right circumstances and with the right company, this would be entirely feasible.

  • Butt Trophy Recipient

    T, you forgot “Being a Mom”

    ** runs away!!!!

  • ElizabethBCarpenter

    I’m not going to lie to you. Working as a test scorer is incredibly dull. Soul crushingly, mind-numbingly dull. Still, if you’re qualified, the pay is pretty decent, and companies like ETS and Pearson pay pretty well per project, anywhere from $10 to $20 an hour http://sn.im/28vcf12

    • WriterLady

      Test-scoring and assessment-writing/editing in general are incredibly boring tasks. But if someone can get into online digital content, print textbooks (which are admittedly becoming more and more obsolete with each passing year, though they still exist), and other teacher materials, it’s actually pretty enjoyable.

  • TwentiSomething Mom

    This was really helpful. I’m going to check some of these sites out. Thanks

  • Linzon

    OMG there’s never going to be anything like TaskRabbit offered in my little Canadian city but I would pay good money for someone to come and deliver beer to me after a hard day when my husband’s out of town and I can’t just abandon the children to run to the liquor store like i have nightmares about doing.

    • Andrea

      I’ll commiserate with you: I am pretty lucky (I suppose) that my husband doesn’t travel hardly ever for work. But a couple of weeks ago his mother passed away and he had to be away for what seemed like years but was only two weeks (and the kids and I went there for the weekend in between, so it wasn’t even two weeks straight).
      Anyways…I am not used to solo parenting and I was so exhausted by the end of each day but could not bring myself to drink a big ass glass of wine because …. I don’t know why. I was paranoid that something would happen and I would have to drive them somewhere and I’d be all drunk! Or maybe not even drunk but enough so that if I got stopped, I’d get sent to up the river with a DUI.

  • Jem

    I do care coordination for a health insurance company, You have to be a licensed Social worker or RN to be one but most let you work from home, if not at first, eventually. Basically you meet with clients in their homes a few times a month and then get to do all the paperwork/referrals from home.

  • Tea

    Freelancing is awesome and head-against-the-wall banging. I do it for illustration and writing, and I love it.

    Also, if you’re crafty or genuinely skilled in an art, consider Etsy or similar craft sales. My MIL makes soap and did well enough to quit her day job.

  • Clarissa

    I work as a customer service person for a clothing company and it is either super busy or mind numbing. it pays well though. You usually have to work in office for a year before they let you work from home though.

  • val97

    I’m always in awe of people who can effectively work from home. I’ve learned from experience that I’m better in an office environment. I don’t even like my coworkers that much, but I do like the structure, and I always dreaded being that person on a conference call with a barking dog or crying baby in the background. My old company tried to sell the idea of remote offices as a perk, but really they were just super cheap.

  • Airbones

    My MIL works at home as a copy editor, I work often at home as a freelance litigation paralegal and legal advocate, and my sister works at home as an underwriter for a large insurance company.

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