10 Easter Egg Hacks That Will Change Your Life

I am all for doing things the easy way. I’m definitely an involved mom that likes doing crap with my kids, but everything that I craft and everything that I cook must have roughly five steps or less.

I’m very excited to celebrate Easter with my toddler this year since he finally understands what’s going on. But I have to confess—I’ve been dreading the thought of dyeing Easter eggs. From what I remember, Easter egg dyeing was a long and arduous process that usually ended with broken eggs and broken hearts (i.e., one of my parents sighing in frustration and/or yelling at me). Not so much fun on the Lord’s holiday.

I want to protect my children’s fragile psyches and also have fun dyeing Easter eggs, dammit! Fortunately for me, the Lord also created Pinterest so that I could research Easter egg hacks to keep the peace and keep my family together.

Don’t lose your shit by dyeing Easter eggs the old-fashioned way. Use these incredibly uncomplicated Easter egg tricks that put the “easy” back in Easter:

1. Boil some eggs and smear paint on them with Q-tips—voilà!

notimeforflashcards.com

notimeforflashcards.com

2. Psychedelic swirl Easter eggs made easy with food coloring and shaving cream.

athriftymom.com

athriftymom.com

3. Just use this whisk, ya dummy!

dumpaday.com

dumpaday.com

4. Roll your Easter eggs around in glitter and sand, ya dummy!

3garnets2sapphires.com

3garnets2sapphires.com

5. Chalkboard paint + chalk = Awesomely easy hipster Easter eggs

simmworksfamily.com

simmworksfamily.com

6. Make like Jackson Pollock with a dribble dye job.

3garnets2sapphires.com

www.bhg.com

7. Slap a trendy temp tattoo on that bitch egg.

brit.co

brit.co

8. Get cray with the hot glue gun.

creativeconnectionsforkids.com

creativeconnectionsforkids.com

9. Use washi tape on Easter eggs so that your kids don’t make a mess.

lovelyindeed.com

lovelyindeed.com

10. Save money on paint and get rid of old nail polish. WIN.

littleinspiration.com

littleinspiration.com

You can reach this post's author, Bethany Ramos, on twitter.
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    • lizinthelibrary

      We were always pretty good easter egg dyers. We even used the wax crayons to color designs on them that wouldn’t therefore get dyed. But that little wire thing you were supposed to hold the egg with was always a disaster. The whisk is beautifully brilliant.

    • Sri

      I feel like some of these are legit easier (I did the shaving cream kind before, the temp tattoo one looks easy, and the whisk idea is so much easier than anything that ever came in those kits) and other ones are a huge PITA (glitter is the herpes of craft supplies and I can’t imagine all of those tiny pieces of washi tape stuck everywhere.)

      I’ve made pysanka since I was like 12, so I’m no stranger to elaborate Easter eggs, but I saw the sand ones and I was like

      http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20130305024940/adventuretimewithfinnandjake/images/3/3e/Mlfw1237_Twilight_Sparkle_nope_nope_nope.gif

      • Bethany Ramos

        Yeah, I would personally never do glitter. I am all about the Q Tips!

      • Valerie

        Glitter is sprinkled all over Hell by the Devil himself. I am convinced.

      • Katherine Handcock

        Liked solely because of making pysanka…I’ve got to get back into doing that, someday when my kids will leave me alone for a few minutes!

        Elmer makes these cool glitter glazes – large pieces of glitter in lightly tinted glue – that MIGHT be easier to do than straight glitter, and at least it wouldn’t end up everywhere. But it still wouldn’t exactly be a kid- (or busy mom-) friendly project.

      • Alicia Kiner

        I LOVE that you not only know what psyanka are, but that you’ve made them too! We used to watch my mom and grandma make them, and try to copy using white crayons, but they never turned out well.

      • Sri

        Where I grew up, there is a huge Polish and Eastern European market, and I used to go and ogle the eggs every year as a kid. One year, our local community education center had a course on how to make them by this little old Polish lady. She was adorable, my eggs were pugly, but I was proud of them, and the next year I saved up my allowance for like 4 months to get the kit from the artist at the market. Never had my parents’ “your money, you spend it on what you want” policy backfired so spectacularly, but some of my fondest memories from being a kid are sitting at the table with my mom (who liked the eggs, but hated the mess, and figured the mess would be there whether she joined in or not), the smell of beeswax in the air, seeing who could make the coolest egg.

      • Katherine Handcock

        If you ever decide to get back into it, there’s a website called Yevshan that sells all the supplies you could ever want – reasonably priced shipping too! I can’t wait to get started again :-)

    • Maria Guido

      The whisk is genius!

      • Kay_Sue

        I had one of those “Why have I never thought of this?” moments reading that one.

      • Rachel Sea

        I think I would break eggs trying to get them in and out of the whisk.

      • Valerie

        It is. I’ve always just used a spoon to gently ease it in but then the kids constantly want to stir with it anyway. The whisk makes more sense.

    • Kay_Sue

      I might actually try the shaving cream one if I ever run out of egg dying kits. When our store was closing last year, I stocked up on Valentine’s Day cards for like, five cents a kit, and egg kits for fifty cents a kit. I think? I don’t remember exactly, but it was such an obscenely low price that I bought enough to dye a small country.

      • Alicia Kiner

        From what I’ve been reading, it might be a better idea to use cool whip. Apparently, the chemicals in shaving cream can be absorbed into the eggs, so they end up not being edible. My hubs would be super disappointed if he didn’t get deviled eggs out of it.

      • Kay_Sue

        As would I. Thanks for the heads up.

    • Rachel Sea

      We fill coffee mugs with warm water, vinegar, and food coloring, and fish them out of the cups with spoons. No mess, no angst, no worries about toxic dye getting into cracks, great colors, and when we’re feeling fancy we paint designs on the eggs with full strength dye.

    • momma425

      Am I the only person who doesn’t even do eggs?
      I don’t like eggs- I can’t personally imagine anything more gross than boiling eggs and strinking up my house, making a huge mess with dye, and then having all these hard boiled eggs to eat. *barf*
      My family has always bought the plastic ones, shoved leftover change inside, and called it a day.

      • Alicia Kiner

        My kids colored their first eggs last year, at 7 and 8. Before that, we did your method, but added in a few eggs with candy. I can’t eat hard boiled eggs at all, but my husband and father in law love deviled eggs, so that’s what I’m going to do with ours after the kids color them this year.

    • Alee

      The link for #6 isn’t working. I’d love to see how these were made!

    • wonderstruck

      Okay, I feel like an idiot asking this and I’ve seen it all over Pinterest, but how is the wisk supposed to make it easier?? I’m imagining trying to get the egg out of the wisk after dying it, and I just don’t understand how it would happen without ending up with the dye mix on my fingers, which makes it seem like it would just be more work than the typical method.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        I agree; it just looks more complicated than it needs to be. Typical Pinterest.

      • Sri

        I figured it was because the eggs fell out of that stupid little hook thing too easily and cracked, resulting in a temper tantrum. For little kids, the whisk would probably work better, but for kids with better motor skills, it’s probably not that important.

    • AP

      Eggshells are porous, so some of these eggs will not be edible (nail polish and chalkboard paint, I’m looking at you! And suspicious of shaving cream, not tasty.)

      Also, a spaghetti ladle is pretty useful for eggs, too.

    • Melastik Bintang

      So nice…!!!!

    • Jem

      Let me just say I tried the shaving cream one last year. They do NOT look like that. I mean unless I wiped the stuff off too soon but I left it on for close to an hour. It was a huge disappointment. We’re doing rice krispy bar shaped eggs. Dip them in chocolate, use sprinkles, done.

    • Katherine Handcock

      Easiest egg hack ever: Take a large piece of paper tower, wrap it around the egg and secure at the top with a rubber band, twist tie, etc., and drizzle dye out of a spoon onto the paper towel; leave it for a few minutes, then unwrap the egg and let it dry all the way. It makes pretty patterns, where the dyes meet they blend to make subtle colour shading, and even a fairly little kid can do it. You can even pre-dye the egg in a light colour if you want as a background shade, although I prefer the look best when it’s all done on the plain white shell.

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