• Fri, Mar 21 - 5:00 pm ET

12 Epic Anti-Vax Comments You See On Every Vaccine Story

I’m not sure if some anti-vax online communities have Google alerts turned on or what, but sometimes a few anti-vaxxers will descend on a story about vaccines and take over the comments section with nonsense and factz™. Sometimes they just respectfully disagree – but usually they spew a bunch of vitriol and nonsense. Here are a few of the latter examples, illustrated with the faces you’ll be making after you read them.

 

1. Vaccines cause disease, will quote creator of vaccine now.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.01.01 AM

I love, love, love anti-vaxxers who quote Jonas Salk. They always neglect to mention that he created the first successful inactive Polio vaccine. So, the originator of the killed-virus vaccine that we use today, is the default spokesperson for the anti-vax movement. That makes sense.

2. Science is flawed. Blah, blah, blah.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.00.29 AM

3. Enter the autism argument.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 9.59.21 AM

4. You’re poisoning your child.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 9.59.46 AM

5. Peanuts?

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.21.29 AM

6.  Vaccines don’t protect you against disease. 

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.26.09 AM

7. Oh, look! The autism argument again.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.31.05 AM

8. Most outbreaks are started by the vaccinated population.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.45.30 AM

9. You are all brainwashed puppets!

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 10.59.44 AM

10. If you don’t travel to third world countries, you’re fine.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 11.10.47 AM

11. Most doctors don’t vaccinate their children.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 11.16.30 AM

12. It’s a personal decision.

Screen Shot 2014-03-21 at 11.26.37 AM

(photo: Andy Dean Photography/ Shutterstock)

Share This Post:
  • shorty_RN

    Lolz for days!

  • Frannie

    My favorite that I keep seeing is “It’s not my responsibility to protect YOUR child.” So if I go out for a drive I don’t need to pay attention to your kids in the crosswalk, because it’s not my responsibility to protect anyone but my own kids, right?

    • keelhaulrose

      That’s good to know next time I’m out driving in a school zone.

    • Linzon

      The people I most often see speeding in the school zones are parents driving SUVs and mini vans so I think a lot of people subscribe to that notion.

    • Frannie

      It’s definitely not a new attitude. We walk DD to school and back and there have definitely been days where I’ve seen other parents flying down the street with zero regard for children crossing the street. It’s just more of the ‘I’ve got mine, I don’t care about yours’ mentality.

    • scooby23

      YES. You’d think people would be more careful because, of you know, FREAKING KIDS crossing. But, nooooo, I guess half-speeding to little McKreanah’s cheerleading practice in your almost-truck sized SUV is more important than another kid’s life.

    • Iwill Findu

      what a wonderfully selfish attitude they have. So does that mean when their children die from these illnesses we don’t have to have any sympathy for them because we protected our children and we can laugh in their faces. Or that I can burn their house down to kill all the germs because I’m just protecting MY child?

    • whiteroses

      I LOVE that response. As a teacher— it’s kind of beyond me how anyone could think that way. I made a career out of protecting other people’s children because they’re the future of the earth.

      But there won’t be an earth to protect if these idiots have their way.

    • Tinyfaeri

      Meh. The earth will still be here, we just might not be. In a macabre way, I find that comforting.

    • Sarah

      Same here. That’s how I argue people who are against recycling.

  • keelhaulrose

    Autism is not a deadly disease!
    And it’s all well and good until your kid gets measles, right? “My kid might die, but at least they’re not autistic or allergic to peanuts!” Calling these people dumb asses is an insult to donkeys.
    I’ve seen the effects of polio my whole life. I’ll take my chances with the vaccine.

    • Tinyfaeri

      Well then how do you explain that autistic people will eventually die? smh

      Some people are just always going to be idiots.

    • keelhaulrose

      Perhaps I should tell them breathing leads to death. I mean, have you ever seen a dead person who HADN’T been breathing at one point or another? The air is full of toxins, you don’t have to be a scientist to know that the shit coming out of the back of cars isn’t natural. They need to avoid the toxins!!!

    • RayneofCastamere

      I keep saying dihydrogen monoxide will be the death of us all, but does anybody listen? NO! They got no problems wallowing around in the stuff!

    • pixie

      Nah, the leading cause of death is living!

  • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

    Brace yourself. The anti-vaxers are coming.

    • Robotic Socks

      I wanna see the anti-vaxxers take on the anti-circumcisors in an epic end-all battle

    • Kelly

      You won’t because they’re the same people.

    • Guest

      That’s simply not true.

    • Kelly

      It is most of the time. People who are foaming at the mouth crazy angry against vaccines are usually the same as those foaming at the mouth crazy angry people against circumcision.

      The rest of us non crazy people are capable of just talking about it without any mouth foam.

    • Psych Student

      What does it make me if I’m a crazy, foaming at the mouth pro-vaxxer (though I’d never take someone’s child away if they didn’t), and crazy, foaming at the mouth pro-choice, and crazy, foaming at the mouth . . . hmmm, I think I should get tested for rabies. ;)

    • Kelly

      It would make you rude. There’s no reason to ever foam at the mouth at your fellow human beings, even if they’re doing something incredibly stupid. It just makes you look like a violent idiot.

    • Psych Student

      I think I agree. It is rude to spit at others and rarely gets points across. Perhaps it’s best that we keep our bodily fluids to ourselves and have calm, rational, discussions.

    • Sri

      Meh. I’m anti-circumcision because having a foreskin is not a life threatening condition, but I’m pro-vaccine because measles are. I’m not a militant anti-circumcision person, but I wouldn’t do it for my son. I’ve just heard too many horror stories about people who wish they weren’t circumcised as babies, so he can make up his mind when he grows up. His having a foreskin isn’t something that puts other people at risk, though, especially when people practice safe sex, unlike being unvaccinated. We’re not all crunchy unwashed hippies who don’t trust doctors.

      I’m too apathetic about what other people do re: baby penises to fight that war, though. Besides, I’m already too busy fighting against creationism to fight on this front, too.

    • Kelly

      If you aren’t freaking out about other people’s penes, I don’t consider you anti-circumcision. You just chose not to do it with your children. Anti-circumcision to me means you’re screaming “BUTCHERER!” at other people and comparing it to female circumcision which has very serious health risks.

    • Kelly

      I’m bored so I’m going to elaborate. It’s kind of like when people call me pro-abortion. The reality is I’m pro choice. I don’t actually like the idea of abortion. I don’t know if I could actually have one without feeling like absolute shit.

      I’m not about making everyone else agree with me though. I’m about letting other people make that decision for themselves and trying to respectful about it.

    • Kati

      The idea of abortion makes me sick to my stomach. I’ve had a miscarriage and it was terrible. Having said that, isn’t it great how nobody dies of heroin overdose since heroin’s illegal? Yeah, didn’t think so. My life experiences don’t help me understand the life situation of someone who seeks an abortion. Safe abortions are a public health issue and making them illegal won’t eliminate abortions. It’s the definition of naïveté to suggest that getting rid of a woman’s safe abortion options also eliminates her desperation to end a pregnancy. Seeing how vaccination is also a public health issue, it should also override the personal opinion of someone who has never been to Africa and doesn’t understand the life experiences of someone who has seen the devastation of measles firsthand how terrible vaccine-preventable diseases can be.

    • http://www.gypsyforlife.blogspot.com/ Trista Crass

      I had an abortion when I was 19, and it never bothered me. But when I was that far along in my successful pregnancy (is that the correct term?), I definitely thought about it how strange and sad it was.

    • Rachel Sea

      The word you are looking for is Intactivist.

    • JustaGuest

      I think the problem is that “anti-circumcision” just means, well, you’re against it. It doesn’t say anything about how rabid you are/how much you try to convince others/etc. So I think that a lot of people are going to go “Wait, I don’t believe in circumcising but I believe in vaccinating…umm…” I think the “intactivist” label that someone mentioned below is more accurate for what you’re talking about.

      And I have no clue if they’re anti-vaxx or not. I try to stay as far away from possible from anti-vaxx people because people who don’t grasp science are scary.

    • Psych Student

      I realize that one or two can be an exception, not a rule, but most of Europe is anti-circumcision (not sure on their vaccine opinions) and I think there is a trend of Americans moving towards anti-circumcision as well. And I am someone who doesn’t plan to circumcise a penis-having baby if we have one (though am not inclined to fight the fight on that one) and will *absolutely* vaccinate all my children with all recommended vaccines on time, and include the HPV vaccine.

    • ninjalulu

      You know, i am anti-circumcisor…for my kid. I dont give a damn what anyone else wants to do, not my kid, my house, my place, and does not affect me in any way.
      BUT!! I am pro-vax, and proud of it. You know why? YOUR kid (generic your, not Frances specifically) comes into MY Kids’ presence, MY house, MY place, and gets the nasty germs all over the place. Affecting ME. Its a public service to keep the Measels, Mumps, Polio, Whooping Cough under control.
      I will glady fight the anti-vaxxer douchecanoes!

    • ninjalulu

      You know, i am anti-circumcisor…for my kid. I dont give a damn what anyone else wants to do, not my kid, my house, my place, and does not affect me in any way.
      BUT!! I am pro-vax, and proud of it. You know why? YOUR kid (generic your, not Frances specifically) comes into MY Kids’ presence, MY house, MY place, and gets the nasty germs all over the place. Affecting ME. Its a public service to keep the Measels, Mumps, Polio, Whooping Cough under control.
      I will glady fight the anti-vaxxer douchecanoes!

    • SarahJane86

      I await patiently. I wanna plaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay.

  • CMJ

    I think the militant anti-circumcision people are the new anti-vaxxers.

    I have seen some crazy conspiracies today.

  • AugustW

    “Professionals in the medical field” is a long way of saying Not A Doctor.

    • http://mother--bored.tumblr.com/ Aimee Ogden

      “Professionals in the medical field” = “I read Dr. Sears’ blog once”

    • rrlo

      Also, EVEN Dr. Sears supports vaccines. He is just into the alternate schedule – which I prefer not to have an opinion on.

      There is no one – with an ounce of credibility – who is anti-vax. I looked for them on the Internet. And even the crunchiest – hippie-dippie, let’s eat only live food person (who is not insane and can read) seem to support vaccines.

    • AugustW

      I guess my parents had me in the alternative schedule. I obviously don’t remember it, but getting my records recently for a job,you can tell by the spacing in the dates. I was a pretty sick kid though, with a genetic defect in my ability to absorb zinc. So maybe that’s why they did it.

    • CW

      No, the schedule back when we were kids had a LOT fewer vaccines. I had 2 shots at 2 months old, 1 shot at 15 months old, 2 shots at 18 months old, 2 shots at 5 years old, and 1 shot at 13 years old, and that was it. None of this 36 shots by the child’s 3rd birthday like the current CDC schedule has.

    • Iwill Findu

      Also if you’re already sick with something else they might not do the vaccine at that time.

    • Frannie

      “I once went to a doctor”

    • keelhaulrose

      “I got my medical degree from Google U”

    • AugustW

      Possibly Wikipedia.

    • scooby23

      Oh,yeah? Well I got MY degree at the FAR superior St.Jenny McCarthy College of Idiocracy. Didn’t you know that Google U has been shown to sometimes be dangerously vaccine-leaning? They must just let anyone into the medical field these days. *SMH*

    • keelhaulrose

      You seem to be holding a lot of anger there.
      *straightens psychology degree from Dr. Phil’s College of Oprah-approved-ness*
      You just need to do whatever plays best with the audience. BUY MY BOOKS!

    • scooby23

      BUY THE BOOKS BUY THE BOOKSSS!!! THE POWER OF DAYTIME TELEVISION COMPELLS YOOUUUU!!!!

    • Psych Student

      “I’ve done the research”. Have you? Have you really? Because if you did, you’d probably be pro-vax.

    • AugustW

      Research. This word doesn’t mean what they think it means.

    • Frannie

      Exactly!

    • http://www.gypsyforlife.blogspot.com/ Trista Crass

      Hey, that guy is an Environmental Technician in a hospital! Has been for 3 months!

      He may or may not be autistic.

  • C.J.

    When did autism become a fatal disease?

    • Abby

      Autism is fatal in the same way that life in general is fatal.

  • pixie

    Autism and allergies, that’s not how they work.

    Plus, as much as it sucks, I would much rather have to avoid tree nuts my entire life than die from a preventable disease.

    And, here’s a lovely piece to show that being “all natural and vaccine-free” does not always mean a healthier childhood:

    http://www.voicesforvaccines.org/growing-up-unvaccinated/

    And here’s an awesome Dr. Seuss-themed poster:

    http://amhistory.si.edu/polio/howpolio/enlargesci_02.htm

  • http://mother--bored.tumblr.com/ Aimee Ogden

    Don’t travel to third-world countries!! You know, like New York City or the United Kingdom.

    Also, whenever someone’s blog name starts with “Musings of”, I know they’re going to be so far up their own asshole that they think their small intestine is a tube top, but when it’s followed up by “a Barefoot Libertarian-Democrat Hippie” I actually black out for a while.

    • CrazyFor Kate

      Not to mention you can’t stop other people from traveling. Who’s to say your neighbor didn’t just come back from somewhere with an outbreak and bring it back with him?

    • Iwill Findu

      Because people from 3rd world counties would never dream of moving to a nice first or even second world country.

    • Jessifer

      People in the 3rd world walk miles through minefields just to get their kids vaccinated because they realize how important it is, which makes them infinitely smarter than some of these anti-vaxxer morons living right here in North America.

    • Katherine Handcock

      I want to like this comment about a million times!

    • http://www.gypsyforlife.blogspot.com/ Trista Crass

      Oh god. I travel a lot, and the anti-vaxxer hippies cannot, will not, understand that the world is different outside the US. Sigh.

    • whiteroses

      I took my son in to a pediatrician in Australia, where he was born. The Ugandan doctor told an anti-vaxx mother to get her overprivileged butt out of his office. The direct quote? “In my country, mothers die to make sure their children get vaccinations. I have no room in my office for someone who has easy access to such things and chooses not to take advantage of them.”

    • HippieButNotStupid

      So much this. I’ve been to the poor districts of Uganda. You see polio victims on carts, and people who had measles as children (and survived) with hideous scarring on their arms, legs and faces.

    • scooby23

      I nearly barfed up my own sense at “Musings of a Barefoot Libertarian-Democrat Hippie.” You just know someone with that title is going to be a, shall we say, reeaaaalllll case.

    • My Oubliette

      “…so far up their own asshole that they think their small intestine is a tube top”

      This. Is. Beautiful.

  • Fireinthefudgehole

    What exactly is their theory as to why third world countries have these diseases that apparently NEVER exist in North America? Do they think those places are just cursed?

    • Anti-vax 4 Life

      Yeah, because God fucking hates poor people and brown people. Everybody knows that.

    • Psych Student

      Oh, and the gays. Don’t forget the gays. (We have to be involved in everything, don’t-ya-know).

    • whiteroses

      Its interesting to me that anti-vaxxers seem to genuinely believe that nobody they know will ever go to the 3rd world, or to anywhere else with outbreaks. That takes a lot of willful ignorance. It’s way less complicated to just listen to the damn science.

    • pixie

      But they do enjoy visiting the DR and other countries like that!

    • whiteroses

      Don’t you know, pixie, that any place that has a Sandals resort is totally cool, because clearly all the diseases just run and hide in the face of all that affluence?

    • pixie

      Right, sorry. My bad!

    • whiteroses

      ALL THE DISEASES!!!! :)

    • pixie

      Sweet, so that means if I ever go to Cuba again I can drink all the local tap water and have ice in all my drinks without getting Hep A or traveller’s diarrhea? Score!
      (Only reason I don’t have my hep a is because by the time I decided I was going to Cuba, it was too late for me to get any of the shots)

    • Iwill Findu

      But now these out breaks are pretty much everywhere thanks to anti-vaxxers, and adults that forget about their boosters.

  • Mrsspring

    I love how the anti vaxers always describe themselves as ‘very’ healthy, like there is a magical level of healthy that the brainwashed big pharma believing underclass can’t possibly attain. Oh what’s that your an gold medal winning Olympian but you’ve been vaccinated, wow you just not as healthy as my un-vaccinated kids with their pure immune system, soz!

    • Bob

      I like that no one ever talks about their ‘healthy unvaccinated kids’ that are under 10 years old. I have yet to see a post (and I see many) that have a an unvaccinated adult or teenage child.

    • Bob

      Oops! Over 10 years old.

    • Kelly

      Yeah, that’s because the parents of unvaccinated children just shut up. It’s too bad they don’t speak up, it could save other children from the same fate.

      My MIL didn’t vaccinate her two youngest children. The middle child ended up with some insane health problems. He’s in his early 20s and walks with a cane. He’s had a lot of the diseases we vaccinate against and their effects are pretty obvious.

      Plus, fun story. We adopted a dog from the pound who ended up having distemper. We got his shots when we adopted him but it was too late. He already had the disease but wasn’t showing signs of it yet.

      Dogs with distemper are a health threat to unvaccinated children! My brother in law ended up in the hospital because of it. There’s a fun fact.

    • Kelly

      It’s hilarious to me because my vaccinated autistic son is the healthiest person I’ve ever even heard of.

      He was 12 the first time he ever vomited. That was the first time he ever had the flu. I remember him looking at me from the toilet and saying, ‘Oh my god, is this what being sick is like? Is this what other people go through? This is horrible!”

      His only other illness was pink eye, when he was five. He caught it at school.

      When people trot out the “vaccinated children get sick more!” bullshit, all I can do is laugh. Anecdotal personal experience stories are meaningless in this debate but if they want a pissing match on whose kid is healthier, I probably win. LOL

    • AugustW

      I’m guessing vaccinated kids don’t get sick more, their parents just take them to doctors when they are sick more.

    • Ro

      Uh yeah… it’s obviously extended breastfeeding that creates magical levels of healthy. These people are so silly! ;)

    • ScienceGeek

      That’s what I don’t understand either. It’s not like these infections are all, ‘Oh, this one’s very healthy. Guess I’ll just go away, then.’ For most of these infections, it doesn’t even affect the severity of the illness. Healthy adults get a massive beat-down from whooping cough, your two year old is not going to fare any better, regardless of what he/she eats.

    • Lauren

      Everyone is healthy… until they’re not!

  • texaslady22

    I’m not an anti-vaxer, but I will say that SOME children don’t respond well to vaccinations. One of my 3 children is one of them. His last vaccination his throat actually closed and he had problems breathing and required an emergency room visit.

    • Kelly

      Sleepy time tea does the same thing to me. Chamomile allergy.

    • Iwill Findu

      But wouldn’t it be nicer if there wasn’t a huge anti-vax movement vaccine rates were up in the 90% and you could safely opt out for your one child that has those very real and legit reason to not be vaccinated?

    • Kati

      I vaccinate my relatively healthy, low-risk kids not only for their protection, but to protect society’s most vulnerable, like newborn babies, kids with egg allergies, or immunocompromised kids, such as a six year old on chemo battling cancer. Ya know, people who don’t matter. Maybe people should try giving a shit about more people than just their own precious snowflake.

    • whiteroses

      Your son is why I vaccinate- because there are kids who need that herd immunity who CAN’T get vaccinated.

    • jane

      I am truly very sorry for that experience. That must have been so scary. It’s true that some children have averse reactions to vaccines, and I am sorry that your child is one of them.

      I just wish that we could recognize (as you clearly do) that even though SOME very small number of kids have a bad reaction, vaccines on the whole are very much a good thing. We should all be glad that the internet didn’t exist when antibiotics first came out; I have terrible allergies to those, but there was no crusade to prevent lifesaving medication for millions of people because they are clearly and obviously bad for me as an exception to the rule.

    • ScienceGeek

      That must have been so terrifying. My sister had a severe dairy allergy that included egg, so she couldn’t have some vaccines. Even though I’m very pro-vaccination, I think people like yourself have every right to refuse, and should be able to share their story without being shouted down. There are legitimate risks, and we need to get that fact out there so it’s not just ‘ALL VACCINATIONS ARE TERRIBLE!’ or ‘VACCINATIONS ARE WONDERFUL!’. Parent should be able to tell their doctor they’re concerned about reactions and get a decent explanation/alternative schedule/whatever works for them without being seen as an anti-vaxxer whose mind cannot be changed.

    • C.J.

      I have a friend that has an egg allergy so is allergic to some vaccines. There are lots of people that can’t be vaccinated due to allergies and other medical reasons. I vaccinate my children to not only protect them but to protect people like your son who cannot be vaccinated.

    • ChickenKira

      I don’t respond well to erythromycin, as in, I am anaphylactic, made that wonderful discovery in hospital when I had pneumonia, which I have to say, if you are going to find out that you are anaphylactic to something, let it be in a hospital.

      So obviously I don’t use that type of antibiotic.
      I’m not anti-erythromycin. I’m not anti-antibiotics, because that would be silly. But it doesn’t work for me.

    • Williwaw

      At the public health clinic where we get vaccinations, they always ask you to sit in the waiting room for 15 minutes after your shots, because although it’s extremely rare, a few people do have anaphylactic reactions to one of the vaccine’s ingredients. (Which is why anti-vaxxers piss me off so much, because children like yours who really do have a medical issue with vaccination need that herd immunity that the rest of us should be providing.)

  • Iwill Findu

    Pretty sure allergies are at lest in part genetic for example both my hubby and ML are both allergic to shellfish so I’ll avoid them with my daughter, my mothers family have problems with dairy so I’ll wait until my daughter is 2 before I give her a big old glass of cows milk. So people going vaccines = allergies just make my head hurt. Because the way I see it those of us walking around with life threatening allergies are also walking around epi-pens, so increasing the chances of living to reproduce and have kids with allergies.
    Also we eat alot more processed foods then years ago but for some reason it’s all the vaccines fault which makes no sense to me. Because you know if I was going to blame something I would look at the non-food foods first.

    • Rachel Sea

      If you are concerned about your daughter having those allergies, it’s easy enough to get her tested. Then you can avoid or not avoid as necessary.

      Or just do what my family did and feed your kid her first bite of crab right outside the ER.

    • Iwill Findu

      She’s only 6 months old at this point so once she’s little older I will likely have her tested for allergies, they say kids can’t have allergy tests in the first year ( or my doctor wont do them yet). I don’t think she’s allergic to milk because I haven’t had to remove it from my diet, and we don’t keep shellfish in the house because even the smell of it will set my hubby off.

    • pixie

      Allergies aren’t necessarily genetic. Both my parents are allergic to penicillin and I’m not and we have no idea where I got nut allergy from because as far as we know, nobody in my family has had one before me. So there’s a good chance your daughter might not be allergic. If that makes you feel any better!

    • cabinfever

      Our allergist tested our daughter at 5 months (she’s high risk because her sister’s allergic to peanuts/tree nuts). She came back negative to everything, with the caveat that allergies can develop at any time.
      My concern was that she hadn’t started solids at the time, so she hadn’t been exposed to any of the allergens before (other than via breastmilk), and my understanding is that the body doesn’t react much to the allergens on first contact.

      But we trust the allergist, and just hope that he’s right when he says he doesn’t think she’ll develop food allergies (knock on wood). So far so good, but I absolutely plan to be in the hospital parking lot for her first couple of exposures to peanuts.

    • pixie

      Speaking from experience with my own allergies: allergies are weird. I’ve tested both positive and negative to almonds before (negative most recently) but I’m not going to take the risk as I tested positive for a bunch of other tree nuts (never tested positive to peanuts, though, yay!). I’d say that your daughter probably isn’t allergic if everything came back negative, but definitely smart move to be in the hospital parking lot for her first couple exposures. (and definitely knock on wood that she never develops an allergy, they suck!)

    • Larkin

      I’ve always said I wanted to do this with peanuts! Sit outside the ER and feed the toddler some peanut butter, then see what happens. Because hardcore allergies are scary as shit.

    • Iwill Findu

      My hubby came into secondary contact with shellfish from a work fry pan (he had no idea someone had cooked shrimp the day before) we were at ER for 6 hrs before he could go home. I just hate sitting around at ER I never have a good book.

    • Katherine Handcock

      When my son was 10 months old, I was at a playgroup where they were having a dip with peanut butter in it, and the woman running it said, very apologetically, “I know you’re not worried, but I’d really prefer if he didn’t try peanut butter for his first time here, just in case he has a reaction.” Sure, whatever – no skin off my nose. It wasn’t until I got home that I realized: at the playgroup I was 5 minutes from the hospital, at home I was 30 minutes from the hospital. I’m pretty sure if he had an allergic reaction it would have been way better for him to be at the playgroup!

    • ScienceGeek

      I understand your concern, and I’m only mentioning this because we had the same concerns (my sister had a severe dairy allergy, my husband is lactose intolerant and I’m basically allergic to everything with fur). When we told our health nurse, she replied that new guidelines for introducing babies to food in Australia came out about 6 months ago, and now they’re suggesting parents expose their children to everything as soon as possible (except for honey, soft cheeses and raw eggs because they carry a higher risk of food poisoning, which I did not know about honey).
      Apparently more recent studies have shown that late exposure increases the risk of allergies.

    • Iwill Findu

      I didn’t know that late exposure increases the risks. Maybe I’ll give her yogurt in the morning.

    • ScienceGeek

      Hope it goes well! :)

    • Iwill Findu

      she wasn’t into yogurt. oh well yogurt again tomorrow.

  • Rachel Sea

    #7 can’t count to 3.

  • TngldBlue

    Oh yes Mrs. Foster, that nasty disease IGNORANCE! So much worse than polio or measles, amirite?

  • Jallun-Keatres

    #7. I just can’t. There’s a difference between being autistic and being so fogged up that you walk into a pool and drown. I know of nobody who does that. WHO DOES THAT???? Never has it been so painfully obvious that BS has been pulled from her butt. The stupid. It burns.

    • G.S.

      Yeah, it’s like, kids without Autism can slip into a pool/lake/creek/whatever, and drown, too. Being neurotypical doesn’t mean you have gills.

      All this ableism just fucking kills me.

    • AugustW

      My daughter might walk into a pool, but it’s her being 3 and not understanding consequences, not her being autistic.

  • CMJ
  • cabecb

    I hate the idea that everything that is “natural” is automatically good while anything seen as “chemical” is bad. Everything is made of chemicals. Not everything in nature is good. When we lived in natural times, people were lucky to live to 30 or 40. People had many children because a number of them would die before reaching adulthood. Basically, life was short and brutal. Why the the hell would people want that?

    • Iwill Findu

      because they’re jerks or stupid?

    • CW

      Actually, IF you made it to adulthood and didn’t die in childbirth, your chances of living to old age were actually pretty good. This was the thing that surprised me the most when I was doing my genealogy. There were a LOT of babies and children who died, and a fair number of women who died the same year as their youngest child was born. But the rest tended to live until their late 60′s or beyond and quite a few made it to their late 80′s or even 90′s.

    • waffre

      True. Most people don’t think about the fact that the historical “average” age of death includes people who died in infancy or in childhood (of “harmless” childhood diseases, how about that!) Even in the middle ages the average lifespan after you made it to adulthood was around 65 rather than the 35 you usually see quoted (I wish I could remember where I read that, it was a good article). But I think it’s still true that you were lucky to live to 30. It’s just that once you got there it was likely to be a lot easier for you!

    • waffre

      /nerd

  • Guest

    Interesting post.

  • Kate

    So basically all the anti-vaxxers are saying, “I’d rather my kid to be dead than to have special needs.”

    • whiteroses

      Yep. If pressed, a lot of the anti-vaxxers I’ve come across will admit that “survival of the fittest” makes complete and total sense to them, and that as long as their kid survives with a healthy immune system, that’s just the way it is.

      When I bring up that such a philosophy is also known as eugenics, they get quiet really quickly.

    • Iwill Findu

      So survival of the fittest does that mean they don’t take their kids to the doctor when they’re sick or are they just big lying hypocrites? Because man I would not want to be their kid and have a life threatening allergy “sorry kiddo no Epi-pen for you cause Big Pharma don’t you know”

    • pixie

      Or the “allergies are just a lie made up by Big Pharma”.
      Do you remember that person on the last post about allergies?!?!?! *headdesk*

    • Iwill Findu

      The allergies are a lie people just kill me, as a person with allergies I can pretty much attest to their existence. And whether or not I believe in them or not doesn’t change the fact that latex and pineapple will pretty much melt my skin off.

    • pixie

      lol yep. I’ve gone full on anaphylactic before and so has my dad and it’s fucking terrifying. If I didn’t believe in them I’d be dead right now ;)

    • Katherine Handcock

      Sadly, some of them genuinely DON’T take their kids to the doctor – because the doctors are all in Big Pharma’s pocket, after all. Also, because the doctor will probably say, “You really should consider the vaccination schedule.”

    • AugustW

      Was it John Travolta who had a son with a treatable disease who died from lack of doctor care? Or am I hallucinating again?

  • JJ

    You forgot the cliche comment made in every anti vax post which revolves around personal paranoid anecdotes based on extremely rare reactions to shots. “Well I won’t vaccinate because one time I saw a girl get her vaccines and she was never the same! Never! I will never give my child a shot ever again because I know every kid who gets shots now will be forever changed, suffer allergic reactions, seizures and turn into Linda Blair in The Excorcist.”. Yeah because one very, very rare reaction to a vaccine shot means all kid who get it the shot are now going react the same. Vaccines while great are not a 100% guarantee for every single person on earth. Some rare people do have reactions and it sucks, I sympathise with them a lot, but that doesn’t mean its going to happen to everyone who gets the shot. Sorry you saw someone who was the rarity case but don’t spread Measles, polio, or whooping cough to other people because you think your kid could be one in a million. Unless the doctors specifically say your child cannot get this shot because they are the rarity who will react badly to it then maybe I can excuse not vaccinating.

    • pixie

      I read one article (I think it was on the Daily Beast) where this one commenter kept bringing up her daughter. I felt REALLY bad for this woman because her infant daughter had a very rare reaction to a vaccine and died as a result. But she kept going on about how doctors didn’t tell her the possible side effects, how the vaccines were pushed on her, how she felt she had no choice. (I believe her daughter also had other medical problems before reacting to the vaccine, I don’t remember as it was a while ago). It didn’t matter how much sympathy other commenters gave her and telling her that if the doctor didn’t tell her anything she could have brought it to court, she could have asked for information, or that she could have looked up the possible side-effects herself, she would respond in the most angry, insult-filled way possible because to her all vaccines were evil and she didn’t vaccinate her other children because of her first daughter and doctors who are for vaccination are the devil incarnate.

      With every reply I saw that she made, I felt less and less bad for her. I cannot imagine how devastated she must have felt, losing her child to a reaction like that, but the amount of venom, hostility, and cruelty in her comments and replies to other people turned me against her. I feel awful for parents who lose their children in any way, but it is still doing a great disservice to be completely opposed to things that can be beneficial for the world at large.

    • Williwaw

      I suppose (this is me reflecting on the subject, not personal experience, since I have never been faced with such a personal tragedy) that when something like that (losing a child) happens, you want to believe that it could have been prevented, you want someone or something to blame, you want to find some reason in the tragedy. Maybe finding something to rage at gives some catharsis? It makes for an awkward arguing situation because I would never want to inflict further pain on someone who has lost a child, but I still think the anti-vax attitude is wrong.

    • pixie

      Yeah, and I totally understood that. I didn’t make any comments towards her, I just enjoy going through comments sections on articles that are pretty well guaranteed to bring out some crazies. But people were generally really kind towards her and the venomous responses were just….yeah I know there’s a lot of pain and grieving, but there’s no reason to be so nasty.

    • Katherine Handcock

      Exactly. The thing is that you could ALWAYS have some extreme, rare reaction to ANY drug, or food, or substance. Freak things like that do sometimes happen — but they could equally easily happen upon exposure to spices in a storebought sauce, or an over-the-counter medication, etc.

      Vaccine reactions, at the very least, are extremely carefully tracked and correlated – my doctor’s office has it posted on the wall which reactions they are required to notify public health about, etc.

    • SmrtGrl86

      As someone who almost died from a vaccine reaction as a baby (seizure) I vaccinate my baby and would love to be fully vaccinated myself, because let’s face it, herd immunity just isn’t what it used to be anymore.

  • MissDelish

    Research=/=Google search.
    Choice for one=/=Danger for others.
    Autistic=/=Destined to drown in a river.

    Well, that’s done. Time to go sit in my house and watch the numbers add up on the latest outbreak in my province. Whee!

  • Kati

    #7 slays me. You vaccinate your child = you’re going to drown them. Never mind that signs of autism start to arise before babies have even had a vaccination. You’re taking your child to the doctor for vaccines?! Obviously you’re trying to kill them in a car accident, you monster!

  • NYCNanny

    These pro- vaccine articles are getting really old. We get it. Vaccines are the shit. Let’s move on to more interesting things.

    • CMJ

      Considering there is a measles outbreak in NYC, I would say keep these articles coming.

    • Iwill Findu

      Now in Canada as well, thanks a lot anti-vaxxers, you suck.

    • amandarosegil

      We have cases of measles in Manitoba right now.

    • pixie

      It’s in 7 provinces. Apparently hasn’t hit the territories, Nova Scotia, or Newfoundland yet. 7/13 is over half. I’m slightly frightened and am glad for being vaccinated. D:

    • Williwaw

      In my province, and in my city. My two year old has had his vaccinations, but since I know protection is not 100%, I get nervous whenever he has anything rashlike (which so far has always been chafing from a seatbelt or some minor irritation that disappeared in fifteen minutes)…I am rational but also neurotic…

    • pixie

      I’m in one of the cities with break outs as well (I’m in Ottawa). I know vaccinations aren’t 100%, but I’d rather have any protection than none!

      And I also get nervous about mystery rashes on my body, but that’s more because of my allergies and not measles.

    • Iwill Findu

      I know makes her scared to take my 6 month old out of the house.

    • Ro

      I find these articles very interesting thank you very much.

    • whiteroses

      If you don’t like it— you don’t have to read it. And as long as anti-vaxxers still exist, these articles need to keep coming out.

    • KarenMS

      I’m almost obsessively interested in these pro-vaccine articles. So maybe move on to less interesting things so I can pay more attention to other things…

  • Ro

    I have a friend who thinks vaccines are the governments way of controlling or pacifying the population. When I point out that this is not in the government’s best interest, the conversation devolves into something that, I kid you not, ends up in lizard people territory.

  • scooby23

    “will you feel sorry when your profoundly vaccine damaged child wanders away, and drowns because they have no sense of danger”

    Yes, because all autistic children are blubbering idiots who can’t be trusted at all, and will definitely get themselves killed. It’s not like there are any autistic people who have, you know, did anything remarkable.
    *Sigh* Just adding to the autism stigma, I guess.

    • MellyG

      I’ve yet to meet an autistic person that just wanders away *smh*

    • Guest

      I am not anti-vax, but yes, Autistic children have been known to run away from problems, or run towards things they want. Most notably, in NYC an autistic boy ran away from school. His body was found months later.

      http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/21/justice/ny-avonte-remains/

    • Katherine Handcock

      But so have neurotypical kids, with the same results. The point @scooby23 is making is that treating autism like it turns kids into totally incapacitated, useless creatures is really damaging. Like so many other things, it totally depends on the kid.

      My son is a totally typical 5-year-old, and I’ve had to have the “don’t go anywhere without telling the person in charge” conversation because he’s very confident that he’s grown-up enough to handle things on his own.

    • MellyG

      Exactly, isn’t “running away or towards” things, a KID thing, not an autistic thing? I mean, i had to be taught to not run into water as a little kid, and i also once ran away from home when i was like 6. I assume that ALL kids kind of have to be watched….that’s why we have things like babysitters

    • scooby23

      Me too. But I guess maybe Google search makes this person an autism expert? The world may never know.

    • G.S.

      I know a person who heard about a heavily autistic eighth grader kicking a pregnant teacher in the stomach during a freak out at her son’s school, and now thinks that autism means “can get angry and violent enough to kick pregnant people in the stomach.” She knows that non-violent Autistic people exist (her son was friends with an autistic girl before she was switched to a special needs school), but pregnant-lady-stomach-kicker is what springs to mind when someone mentions Autism. As someone who believes that a) a neurotypical person could just as easily kick a pregnant woman in the stomach for a number of the same reasons, b) knows that a number of Autistic people wouldn’t even dream of kicking a pregnant woman in the stomach and to label them all as “possible pregnant stomach kickers” is incorrect, and c) believes that a lot of cases of Autism throughout the spectrum can improve with the proper and needed tools at hand, it really grates on me.

      I’ve also had to tell her that “brain damage from an allergic reaction,” while shitty, is not Autism, and rare, and that Autism is something that you’re born with, and that the study about the link was proven false. I don’t know if she fully believes me, but her baby is vaccinated, even if on a bit of a slower schedule.

      It doesn’t help that her mother is constantly watching youtube videos on vaccination (she drank the Jenny McCarthy kool-aid YEARS ago) and tells her all about the horrible things she hears without actual fact checking. And then pulls the old, “Back when I lived in Poland, nobody was vaccinated and nobody had any of these things!” She caught mumps while she was in boarding school in Poland.

    • scooby23

      Man, that doesn’t sound great! I’d recommend maybe, the next time it comes up, I’d point out some trusted, professional websites and/or books that debunk the myths that your friend believes. I don’t know what to do about her mother, though. *sighness*

    • G.S.

      The mother worries me more than anything, since she lives with a 10 year old and a 16 month old, and her favorite kind of youtube video is, “How everyone who is not a white Christian will doom/has doomed us all somehow (and the Holocaust was greatly over-exaggerated and the jews are bunch of whiners, (DESPITE THE FACT HER OWN MOTHER’S FAMILY WAS TAKEN AWAY BY NAZIS)),” and told the baby, “When you get older I will tell you all of these horrible things, but for right now, you’re a baby.” My jaw was on the floor. Her daughter however, knows that’s all bullshit and tells her to cram it whenever it comes up, because she’s not raising a pair of racists.

      And when she got to, “Sandy Hook never happened and it was all just a military exercise! Look at those parents setting up fundraisers! It’s clearly a hoax!” I have never been so ready to completely go and smash a laptop in all of my life (I didn’t, but I wanted to so, so badly).

      Another person I know is taking her in for the summer, though, and plans to straighten her out (since she wasn’t always such a bigot).

    • scooby23

      That sounds pretty sad. I wonder what turned her into a bigot. Do you know?

    • G.S.

      Yeah, it was all the televangelists and propaganda on Youtube. It started off with just a few sermons, but then, because the dark, crazy fundie side of Youtube is strong, it turned into Muslims who converted to Christianity talking about how the main objective of Muslims is to destroy Christianity and all the Christians, and it all went downhill from there (and they ALL pull the “I can’t complain about these people on the street without getting arrested, so you KNOW I’m right! Poor oppressed me!” line). She now thinks that the reason North America started being a sucky place to live is because immigrants came over who weren’t white, European and Christian and ruined everything for everyone because they’re the single bringers of crime. Uggggggh.

      And it’s like, she lived for 30 something years in Toronto. On Jane and Finch. She never had a problem with not-white-and-Christian immigrant people then.

    • scooby23

      Oh, man, that sounds tough. Really shows the power of the internet, doesn’t it?

    • Boots

      Coming from Poland, I can safely say that even in the village where my grandfather was the only doctor, pretty much everyone was vaccinated. But you can’t inoculate against the stupid, it seems.

    • Boots

      Coming from Poland, I can safely say that even in the village where my grandfather was the only doctor, pretty much everyone was vaccinated. But you can’t inoculate against the stupid, it seems.

  • RayneofCastamere

    Autism removes your sense of danger and makes you drown yourself? News to me. I mean, I’ve never yet had the urge to…

    …the sea…

    …it calls to me…

    IA DAGON

    • KaySue_DammitDisqus

      Have no fear, it is only the Drowned God calling. That which is dead may never die.

    • itpainsme2say

      Whats up with your screen name? #nosey

    • KaySue_DammitDisqus

      I am out of town with no internet access except my phone. Mobile Disqus hates me and never lets me sign in. #PoorMe

      Usually I just Guest-vote and don’t worry about commenting in these scenarios, but Rayne’s comment was too big of an opportunity for a GoT reference for me not to respond.

      So Dammit Disqus…

    • RayneofCastamere

      But rises again, harder and stronger. To the waves!

      I wonder why the Drowned God likes people with autism. Do we just make good oarsmen for his battle against the Storm God?

    • KaySue_DammitDisqus

      The absolute best oarsmen.

  • Lackadaisical

    Is there a vaccine against stupidity? I really need it as some of my braincells shut down in protest when reading the anti vaccine comments. I would go through and debunk them one by one but you have all done it so eloquently and anyway they are so blindingly, stupidly ridiculous that all those bad arguemnts now need is for me to point and laugh.

  • MellyG

    The stupid, it hurts!

  • Courtney Lynn

    “Dying from autism”. Reason #1 why most of us “just can’t” with anti-vaxxers. Ugh.

  • LaLa

    All you have to do with an anti-vaxxer is point out that most of them were given vaccines as babies and children. Then ask them how their life with autism and tons of life threatening allergies is going. Oh, what’s that? Most of them don’t have autism or life threatening allergies? Huh… Funny how that works out.

    • RCIAG

      Exactly. And a lot of us of a “certain age” probably had vaccines that had worse stuff in them than they do now.

    • CW

      Yes, we got a few shots, but FAR fewer than are on the current CDC schedule. I recently had to get a copy of my records to prove that I’ve had the measles shot. It is SHOCKING to see how many fewer shots I got as a kid in the ’80′s than are on the current CDC schedule. I had 2 shots at 2 months old (DTP and polio), 1 shot at 15 months old (MMR), 2 shots at 18 months old (DTP and polio), 2 shots at 5 years old (DTP and polio), and 1 shot at 13 years old (MMR). That’s it.

  • Sarah
  • Jenna

    What’s funny is that we are all about vaccinating our children, but most of us are not up to date on adult vaccines. Have you gotten your influenza, Td boster, or HPV vaccine (all recommended bt the CDC)? If not, you are putting the “herd” at risk. So if you aren’t up to date on your own vaccination, quit judging all the parents who don’t vaccinate their children.

    And yes, my child is vaccinated and I am partially vaccinated (haven’t had my HPV vaccine).

    • pixie

      My doctor is pretty kickass and makes damn well sure my boosters are up-to-date.
      Only one I don’t have is HPV because I was too old (only by a couple years) to get the free shot when it came out and I really don’t have the money to pay a couple hundred bucks for each of the three shots at the moment and I’m pretty sure my dad’s insurance doesn’t cover it (full time student under 25, so I’m still covered by my parents).

    • CMJ

      I don’t have HPV because I am old and married. But I have everything else….so I will judge the fuck out of people.

    • Jenna

      Go right ahead, but those who haven’t (which is probably the majority), need to shut it.

    • MellyG

      I’m up to date on everything I CAN be up to date on – I Just checked because of the stupid measles outbreak. I don’t have HPV because i’m too old, and flu shots….i can’t get them for various reasons.

      And some people can’t be up to date – or have low immunity – that’s the point of herd immunity

      So i’m with CMJ – judging away :)

    • Katherine Handcock

      That’s a good point! Now that we’ve finally got a family doctor here, it’s one of the things on our list :-)

      Does the CDC recommend HPV for adults in the US? Here in Canada its recommended only until age 16/first sexual activity.

    • pixie

      My doctor said they give it up to 25 (to make up for those of us who were too old to have it administered in school/for free by the time came out), though this doesn’t really answer your question because I’m also in Canada. ;)

    • Katherine Handcock

      Interesting…might depend on province too. I know the NB vaccination schedule is quite different from NS — something that left my 5-year-old seriously unimpressed when we discovered he needed a bunch of catch-up vaccinations to be ready for the start of school in the fall!

    • pixie

      That would make sense. I’m in Ontario.
      & poor little guy. I hope he at least gets/got a lollipop for his having to deal with all those needles! :)

    • Katherine Handcock

      The first session was rough – three needles, two in one arm and one in the other. And since I didn’t realize he needed so many, I hadn’t prepared him ahead of time — oops. He was pretty upset! But he got some Skylanders stickers, which made up for a lot ;-)
      Second phase of getting him up-to-date only required one, and I gave him a little pain medication ahead of time, which seemed to make a big difference. One more set to go, but he’s got five months before that happens.
      My daughter’s NS immunization record had an error on it, so now we have to wait to get the doctor’s records in order to do the same to her…yeah, that’ll be fun.

    • pixie

      Well that’s good that he got stickers!
      And that sucks that there’s an error on your daughter’s records.

      My parents are actually looking into vaccines right now, since they were never immunized for measles, mumps, etc (they’re both 58 so are too old to have had the vaccines as kids). They both had measles and mumps and the chicken pox as kids, but my mom suspects she had measles recently when she had this rash on her body. She thought it was eczema at the time because she didn’t feel any different, just really itchy and she’s very healthy so she didn’t have any complications and got over it pretty quick, but with the news of the outbreaks she’s wondering (and for the record, she’s pretty sure she didn’t pass it onto anyone if she did have it, since we don’t know anyone who’s been diagnosed with it) . My parents would rather be safe than sorry and not pass something nasty onto another person who can’t get vaccinated.

    • Katherine Handcock

      Fortunately, it’s not a major error — they just don’t have the correct dates to enter into her NB vaccination record. So they know she had all of the vaccinations NS recommends, just not when. So once the medical records get transferred, it’ll be a quick fix, and she has two years before we have to submit her information for school.

    • Jessifer

      I live in Ontario and when I went for my last PAP smear at a local women’s health clinic, they offered to give me the HPV shot even though I’m 30 years old.

    • pixie

      Wow. So many different numbers!
      Well, I guess that means if I ever want to get it I have more time to save up my money to pay for it.

    • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

      I asked for the HPV one when I was 24 and for whatever reason it kinda got swept under the rug =/
      I am up to date on my Tb booster. Shit, I had a bad reaction to that. My arm felt awful and I was physically out of it for two weeks. I can’t describe it except that I felt “bad”.
      Still not anti-vax, though. Bad reactions are better than the actual disease.

    • Williwaw

      Well, I don’t think that’s entirely fair…many adults don’t realize that they need boosters as adults, and might follow through if there were a public service ad campaign to remind them. It doesn’t mean they share the same stupidity as anti-vaxxers – they may just be careless or busy or temporarily ignorant. I have gotten boosters as an adult, but I wouldn’t have known I needed them if the public health nurse who vaccinated my son had not reminded me.

    • AP

      Doctors are *terrible* at reminding adults when vaccination recommendations change. I had to do all the research, beg, and then tell the doctor the name of the vaccine formula when I got the Td booster. It’s ridiculous.

    • Iwill Findu

      Mine were all done 4 yrs ago before I went on a trip. How long are they good for I forgot?

    • Jenna

      Td boster should be done every 10 years, influenza annually, not sure about HPV. CDC had a adult vaccination chart though.

    • MellyG

      Here is the chart- most are too old for HPV, which is a shame, http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-schedule-easy-read.pdf

    • whiteroses

      Up to date on all boosters here!

  • breakfastburrito

    I love all the comments regarding doctors not vaccinating their own children.
    All “medical professionals” are vaccinated. You can’t get a job in a hospital without extensive documentation that you’ve been vaccinated against: Measles, Rubella, Mumps, varicella, Hep B, tb, Flu etc. When I relocated to NYC I lost my paperwork for my Mumps vaccine. The hospital made me get a booster, even though I was certain I’ve had it in the past. You can’t just waltz into HR and say, “I’m healthy!”

    • pixie

      My boyfriend is going to college in the fall to become a paramedic and though he’s not the biggest fan of the flu shot since he always gets the flu-like symptoms, he realizes that working in that field he’ll have to get the vaccination and has no problem with it.

    • JAN

      Not exactly. Every hospital I’ve ever worked in does antibody titers so it doesn’t matter if you e had the vaccine or the disease, just as long as you have the antibodies. I’m old enough I had chicken pox, there was no vaccine, but because of that I have the antibodies. The downside is I end up with an MMR about every five years because I’m one of those people with failure to seroconvert with the Mumps component of the vaccine. I’m not sure how a hospital would handle a religious objection to vaccines.

    • ninjalulu

      The hospital i work for has this policy: If you are refusing the flu vaccine, for whatever reason (this year they arent allowing for anything but allergies and religious) you MUST wear a face mask from the start to finish of flu season. You know how long that is in Illinois? Seriously a minimum of 4 months. And if you are caught without the mask, you face suspensions and being fired. If you refuse the other vaccines, including TB testing, and you are either not hired or fired. You cannot work in a hospital, with newborn to elderly infirm, and not have vaccines. Not only for your health, but because you can pass all sorts of shit on to your patients. The Health Departments dont play, so neither do we. We dont want the fines or the illnesses. Neither do our patients.

  • Jallun-Keatres

    I know I’m not supposed to use the R-word, but I am seriously questioning your intellect.

  • tk88

    This is why vaccinations should be even MORE mandatory. We need to stop these idiots because they start killing off children (and adults!) with compromised immune systems. Not that I want anyone to have to struggle with the difficulties autism can bring, but I really hope more of these “anti-vaxxers” have autistic children. Maybe then they’ll see it’s a freaking genetic condition and not caused by injections.

  • Katherine Handcock

    #3 – I had no idea autism was fatal now. Thanks for filling me in!

    Gahhh…

  • Alex Lee

    I like argument #6. They trot out this MD’s published work in a very medical-sounding journal.

    1. The work was published in the Journal of AIH in March of 1983

    2. AIH stands for the American Institute of Homeopathy

    3. What is “homeopathy”? Well, according to Wikipedia, it’s the philosophy that “like cures like”. For example, giving a snakebite victim tinier doses of venom.

    “Homeopathic remedies are found to be no more effective than a placebo,[2] and homeopathy is widely considered a pseudoscience”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathy

    But, hey, you’re free to put your faith and trust into whatever you believe in and try not to look like an idiot while doing so.

  • Sarah

    My favorite come-back is “You seem educated enough to know the doctor who said vaccinations cause autism lost his license and fabricated the evidence.”

    But seriously, this enrages me. I don’t even have kids!!! But I don’t want to get the plague from your sneauflaykke.

  • Williwaw

    The anti-vaxxers get me so mad I should probably avoid reading anything about the subject to keep my blood pressure down. Spirited intelligent debate on a subject is fun. Arguing with a stone wall of willful stupidity just makes my blood boil. You know these nuts have made up their minds regardless of any evidence and no force on earth will make them amenable to reason.

  • mycrapidontwant

    i have no idea what i am doing !!!!!!!!!

  • Blooming_Babies

    Clearly this topic gets tons of comments and is good for site traffic but do we really need to read another pro vax article every week? Yawn, seriously, I get it. People who don’t agree with you won’t be swayed by some random blogger calling them idiots. This one in particular is mean spirited and beneath the quality of this site.

    • whiteroses

      She’s repeating other people’s words. And they’re words that are, quite frankly, not using a lot of logic or common sense.

  • koolchicken

    I’d never heard number 11 before. But my husband and all his buddies would LOVE to have a talk with this moron. Any good doctor has vaccinated their kids. I’m not sure what quack she’s been talking to. But it’s no one who wants to keep their license.

  • RCIAG

    Here’s the thing, most of us didn’t grow up with these horrible diseases & their consequences.

    Ask anyone over 65 what it’s like to grow up under the shadow of polio. It was horrifying & crippling disease.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/10/16/162670836/wiping-out-polio-how-the-u-s-snuffed-out-a-killer

    Just look at any of the pics in that link. I’m so glad that the anti-vaxx movement would prefer their children in iron lungs, leg braces & maybe an early death if their breathing was affected.

    Thank the gods that Jonas Salk was a true believer & injected his own family in his quest to eradicate the disease. Every kid that went out & collected dimes to help stop the disease is disgusted with these people.

    • CW

      Most of us grew up when many fewer vaccines were given. I recently had to get a copy of my records to prove that I’ve been immunized against measles and it was shocking to see the difference between the ’80′s schedule vs. the current CDC one. There wasn’t a big controversy over vaccines back when we were kids because doctors weren’t giving so many shots so close together.

  • Ro

    I just came across this comment and had to share,

    “Actually, I trust few doctors as most are drug pushers for big pharma. According to the CDC

    Children (19-35 months):
    MMR (1+) 89% DTP/Dtap (3+)† 93% Polio (3+) 83% Hib (3+)§ 86% HepB (3+) 37%
    so the “herb immunity” level has been reached yet you say the numbers of illness is rising.
    Source: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/imz-coverage.html
    Unfortunately the data for older children and adults would not load for me. I would suspect the data for older children is higher since school children are required to be immunized and it is difficult if not impossible to get a waiver to not immunize for school.

    I’m confused. “God” makes an amazing universe filled with amazing organic food and (s)he skimps on peoples immune systems so we need to inject toxins into our babies and ourselves? I’m not saying no medical intervention is ever necessary. I am saying the research says vaccines are both dangerous and ineffective.”

    It is just so cliched. Apparently a couple hundred years ago, before vaccines, we lived in Rainbow Land where we all ate organic food (well, that’s actually true) and nobody ever got sick because no toxic science.

    • G.S.

      Kind of reminds me of this joke about the man in a flood. He hears about a flood coming, and decides that if he sat on the roof, God would come and save him. He goes and sits up on the roof, and a man in a rowboat comes by and tells him to hop in and he’ll row him to safety.

      “No need,” the man says. “My God will come and save me.”

      As the waters rise higher, another man in a boat comes by, and also offers him a ride to safety.

      “Don’t trouble yourself,” the man again declines. “My God will come and save me.”

      As the waters have risen so high that his shoes are wet on the roof, a helicopter comes flying above him and lowers a ladder, telling him to climb up and get inside and they’ll take him to safety.

      “No, thank you,” the man refuses. “My God will come and save me.”

      The man drowns. When he goes to heaven and sees God, he says, “God, I don’t understand. Have I not been a man of faith? Why didn’t you save me from drowning?”

      God looks at the man completely confused. “I sent you two boats and a helicopter, what more did you want?”

  • AshTheFlash

    For all the smoke Mommyish blows about “shaming”…… The intent of this article is clearly inflammatory, shaming, if you will. I vaccinated my first born with no regrets. I have chosen to delay vax for my second born and limiting it to life-threatening disease prevention only. I am not stupid or irresponsible. At 7 weeks of age my daughter was diagnosed with epilepsy. Because of concern for her overall neurological health it is prudent to delay until the blood brain barrier is less permeable. I used to enjoy Mommyish for not shying away from controversy but the new attitude of insulting those one disagrees with (with foul and unintelligent language no less) has left a bad taste in my mouth. Bring back intelligent debate, Mommyish!

    • CMJ

      But no one is talking about your situation in a bad light. In fact, the reason we are so appalled at these people is because they DON’T have any medical reason for not vaccinating and are actually putting your child at risk.

      I have no problem shaming anyone (with foul language) that actively chooses to not vaccinate their child for the reasons above. They are uninformed, unintelligent, and, frankly, dangerous. There are deadly measles’ outbreaks across the world. These people are putting everyone at risk. If anything, we are advocating specifically for people like your child who cannot get vaccinated.

    • whiteroses

      Your child can’t get vaccinated. You’re not the type of parent we’re talking about. The type of parent we’re talking about is the type who has no conceivable reason not to vaccinate and chooses not to because of “autism” or “causing allergies”, or because their snowflake can’t have all those nasty toxins in their bodies, or ear infections- none of which have any basis in reality. It’s such extreme selfishness that it boggles the mind. They’ll freely admit that their child is the only one on earth who means anything to them.

      These parents are dangerous. They chip away at herd immunity and use what little knowledge they have to cudgel those who don’t agree. It’s not fair, it’s not right, and they deserve to be screamed at for bringing back life-threatening diseases and putting other people’s lives at risk. Part of the reason why this makes me so angry is because my son has immunocompromised friends, my 88 year old grandmother wouldn’t survive a bout with the measles, and my cousin has a newborn son who can’t get vaccinated until he’s older. These people put people I love at risk. That’s not acceptable, and I’ll call them idiots if that’s what it takes.

  • Pingback: The Four Most Argued About Parenting Topics Online

  • tieduptwisted

    What the hell is a “natural nutritionist”? That sounds like a job you just made up so you stay home and write-off part of your mortgage as a business expense.

    Hipsters getting polio are going to giving new meaning to ironic. How retro!

  • Pingback: Anti-Vaxx Racist Mom Charged With Parental Kidnapping