20 Reasons You Should Be Raising Your Kids In Texas

shutterstock_130932041People hate Texans for the same reason Texans love Texas—a huge sense of pride in their home state, er, country. Yes, Texas is still on the way to becoming its own country again, so visit while you can, before you need a passport. God bless Texas.

While Texas isn’t necessarily the best place I’ve ever lived, I was born and raised here, and I’m back again. I’m going to make the best of it, and I’m also raising my kids here. Contrary to popular belief, Texas doesn’t suck so bad.

There are quite a few benefits to raising your kids in Texas, if you like barbecue and a cheap cost of living:

1. Beautiful Weather Year Round.

Texas is a little too hot for my liking, but it does have a few seasons. Now that I have kids, I realize that the warm weather is a blessing in disguise because we are never holed up inside all winter. In Texas, you’ll be playing in the park in January and tubing the river in March.

2. A Short Drive To A Semi-Beautiful Beach.

3. Cheesy Family Pictures On The Side Of The Road During Bluebonnet Season.

4. Texan Culture.

Texans are crazy about their culture. I remember taking Texas History class in the seventh grade and visiting the Alamo religiously each year on class field trips. Remember the Alamo!

5. Easiest Kids’ Birthday Party Idea Ever: Grocery Store Piñata.

6. Mexican Culture.

I love where I grew up in South Texas with a rich Mexican culture; in San Antonio, Hispanics make up almost 63% of the population. My husband is half-Mexican, and my kids are a quarter Mexican, making my family the perfect example of Tex-Mex roots.

7. Missing School For Drinking Holidays: Viva La Fiesta!

8. Cheap Cost Of Living.

Probably my favorite part about living in a smaller town near a large city in Texas is the dirt cheap cost of living. My husband and I make a good income, and because of low housing prices, we have extra cash to spend on fun family outings and to save for the future.

9. NO State Taxes.

10. Strong Economy.

Texas dominated the Forbes list of Best Cities For Good Jobs, and it is a wonderful place to live if you are looking for steady work. Top cities include Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio—take your pick.

11. Wendy Davis.

12. Teaching Your Kids Southern Hospitality.

13. Good School Systems.

I’m no education expert, and teachers, you can correct me if I’m wrong—but I always hear so many things about good Texas school systems. Proof? Texas had over 400 schools ranked in the 2013 US News Best High Schools list.

14. An Excuse To Eat Barbecue Every Day Without Judgment.

15. An Excuse To Eat Queso Every Day Without Judgment.

16. An Excuse To Eat Bluebell Ice Cream Every Day Without Judgment.

17. An Excuse To Eat Breakfast Tacos Every Day Without Judgment.

18. Riding Horses To School.

This is one of the biggest misconceptions about Texas by far. Sorry to disappoint, but I’ve never ridden a horse to work or school. I just use my trusty car like the rest of the world. But I’m sure kids still ride horses to school somewhere in Texas… Right?

19. Down-To-Earth, Often Overly Friendly, Population.

20. Beyoncé, Enough Said.

(Image: David Lee/Shutterstock)

If you are interested in submitting 20 reasons why you think your state is a great place to raise kids, send an email to our editor Eveevevawter@gmail.com.

You can reach this post's author, Bethany Ramos, on twitter.
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    • Megan Zander

      What in the world are those short shorts girls doing? Is that to prevent chaffing? Keep the shorts from riding up? Cold liquid air because they’re sore from horseback riding? Perfume? Spray tan? My imagination is running wild.

      • Bethany Ramos

        I don’t know!! I think…. freshness?

      • Megan Zander

        You’re the Texpert, so I’ll go with that, but I feel like there’s a secret Texan thing here I’m being excluded from due to my Yankee-ness.

      • https://twitter.com/FaintlyXMacabre Theresa Edwards

        I pray I never live to be referred to as a Texpert.

      • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

        I am now gonna call everyone a Texpert

      • Megan Zander

        Hey, if the boot fits…

      • CandaceB

        “Texpert” for the win!

      • Caitlin

        As a “Texpert” I have seen this… It is spray deodorant! It gets really hot and sticky down here (no pun intended) and we loveeee partyin’ down!. So it’s a multi-tasker: freshness, reduced perspiration and if its the powdery kind, it apparently reduces dance related chaffing. While I haven’t partaken in this particular activity, I have experienced the pleasure of an outside fiesta… in 105 degree weather… with 90% humidity.

      • Justme

        Yes! Spray deodorant will forever be equated with junior high locker rooms!

      • evilstepmom

        If your thighs touch in the summer in Texas, you’ll figure this one out pretty fast!

      • TwentiSomething Mom

        I think its to prevent chaffing when they ride their horses to school.

    • Jell

      Cheers for TX representation! It is a beautiful place to live and grow up, I spent a few years there and I miss it very much.
      Honestly, it’s such a large place with so much cultural diversity that people who knock it have either never been or have only seen a small part of it.

      • Kat

        It’s easy to knock it when you don’t live there because all you hear are the Crazy Pants who shout at top volume about restricting women’s rights and seceding from the US. You don’t hear about the vast majority of people who are nice, friendly, and just trying to live their lives in peace. Also, queso.

      • ALT19

        Also, margaritas.

    • Kat

      I’m a Yankee import, and just yesterday I informed my Texan husband that we’re taking the baby for photos in the Bluebonnets. NOT OPTIONAL. GET THE CAMERA READY. But I need to find some that aren’t on the side of a freeway because babies + speeding vehicles = Pet Semetery flashbacks.

      • Bethany Ramos

        OMG I hate that movie so much. But people brake for babies! You will see families laying all over the road in bluebonnet season. :-)

      • Kat

        Me too! I watched it at a sleepover in my early teens and I swear, I’ve been scarred ever since. There’s a pretty rest stop north of Austin that has the BEST Bluebonnets that I’ve seen that are publicly accessible (I’ve seen a lot of beautiful patches on people’s private land but I’m not sure they’d enjoy me hopping the fence with my kid and DSLR). It’s a bit far to drive to though. I’m on the lookout for good spots in the DFW area.

      • Bethany Ramos
      • Kat

        Thanks!!

      • CandaceB

        The JCPenney Headquarters in Plano has huge fields of bluebonnets every year.

      • Kat

        Awesome! Thanks!

      • Natasha B

        That book scarred me for life.

      • Guest

        One more thing that you might want to think about. Hopefully, the picture shows up. Don’t forget about Copperheads, Cottonmouths, King snakes, Rat snakes, etc. And don’t pick them. It is against state law and you will be prosecuted, unless they are on your own property. Enjoy!

      • Guest

        The picture didn’t show up. Google Rattlesnakes and Bluebonnets. Check the area carefully.

      • Kat

        Thanks for the tips!

    • LadyClodia

      My husband’s higher ups tried to convince the department that they all have to move to Texas, but no one will. Right now most of them are based near NYC, and others, like my husband, work from home. He acted like he might be up for a move when his boss asked, but then he told his boss that I wouldn’t agree to the move. Which is true. The main reasons are that I’m not up for moving anywhere and I don’t want to be that far away from my family. I will admit that there is a part of me that wouldn’t consider it just because it is Texas, and I will also admit that that is me just being irrational and unreasonable about it.

      • Paul White

        Well then. We don’t want you either :P

      • LadyClodia

        Well, I did admit to it being irrational and unreasonable. Plus, I think I’m too much of a Northern bitch to get along well in the South.

      • chickadee

        Hi there. I am a transplanted Northern Bitch. You should stay where you are, and save a place for me.

      • Jennifer Freeman

        I am also a transplanted Northern Bitch, and I must admit that my personality does not do well down here. Something about being direct really bothers folks here in Jaaaaawjuh.

      • chickadee

        Yep — I lived in Georgia for a couple of years, and “direct” tends to equal “rude.”

    • Justme

      I think the education thing depends on where you live. I got a MUCH better education at my suburban high school than my cousins did in the far reaches of west Texas.

      The funny thing is…as a suburban schoolteacher, I get lots of out of state move ins whose parents think their child will be SO advanced because we are just “redneck, barbarian texans” (true words from a parent). But those parents are surprised when their child struggles due to our rigorous curriculum and competitive student body.

      • Tinyfaeri

        TX also has a lot more schools than a lot of states just because it’s so huge – if you have three times the number of schools in your state, it greatly increases your odds of having a lot in the top rankings (or you have a really huge problem).

      • Véronique Houde

        that’s ’cause you’re their awesomest teacher ;)

      • Justme

        Well. I hope so. I woke up at 6:00 this morning (on my spring break) after a nightmare about the upcoming state tests. I hope you can say the same thing in a few weeks!

      • SarahJesness

        I went to a suburban high school (that had money!) and it was pretty terrible. Unless you were in the advanced classes, you’d get a sucky education.

      • Justme

        You know what? I’m tired of people dog piling onto the education system and telling me how terrible it is…because essentially you are telling me that I’m doing a shitty job at something which I have devoted my life to doing. Nurses, doctors, scientists, even lawyers don’t get jumped on as much as teachers do – and the sad thing is…the vast majority of teachers don’t get to make any policy decisions – we just have to make those policy decisions work in our classroom.

        I am currently on spring break, which is a time to refresh, relax and rejuvenate before hitting the home stretch to summer vacation. But you know what I am doing? I’m stressing. I’m having nightmares about testing. I’m waking up in the middle of the night and adding things to my list of “how to prepare my kids for the test.” I’m not sitting around on my ass, living off some cushy government paycheck while handing out packets of math problems.

        I know you don’t deserve this tirade aimed at you…but a large portion of this thread has turned into “Texas education is shitty,” when the REAL issue is that shitty people have been elected to make decisions about education in Texas. People who have their own needs and the needs of their very wealthy friends in mind instead the needs of children in the Texas public school system. People who have never stepped into a classroom in an official manner – a manner aimed at educating the WHOLE child. A child who might be hungry, abused, neglected, or simply not given the necessary tools to be successful in school by their parents. The beauty of an American education is that it is the right if EVERY child to receive a free education – this means kids who are functionally illiterate, children whose parents are migrant workers, children who have spent years shuttled through the foster system, and even kids who have every material item in the world with no supportive parent available. We. Teach. Everyone.

      • pixie

        I have a lot of respect for great teachers. Are there teachers who sit on their ass and only do the minimum because they had no idea what else to do? Sure. But from the sound of it, you are definitely NOT one of those. I think you’re a great teacher.

        I wish I had a teacher like you in elementary school (I call anything K-8 “elementary school” because middle schools/junior highs aren’t really a thing up here, at least in the area where I grew up and nearly all pre-secondary schools were K-8). I had a couple ok teachers, but most of them really didn’t seem passionate about their jobs, and I think the age group you teach (I’m pretty sure it’s middle school?) it is super important for students to have teachers who really care about the success of ALL their students.

      • SarahJesness

        I’ve got no problem with the teachers. It’s the administration that blows. One of the biggest problems in American education is that teachers don’t get enough freedom to teach what they want. I went to a “nice” school but it was all teaching to pass the standardized test, and pandering to idiots, and lessons always got cut short so we could learn “test taking skills” like highlighting every other word in a question and that we should spend five minutes on each question.

        My comment said nothing about the teachers. Hell, both of my parents are teachers. The teachers can’t control the system and I’m totally aware of that. I don’t blame them for the problems in the education system. My high school, if you were in the regular classes you got a terrible education because the teachers were forced to cater to the lowest common denominator and make things so easy and give out so much extra credit and curves that even the kids who fall asleep in every class could pass.

    • Guest

      My inlaws moved down about a year ago and my FIL is all gung-ho about being a Texan and never fails to tell us about how everywhere else in the country sucks. That being said, I really liked it when I visited and I could stand a non-snowy winter.

    • Brittany Anne

      Yes! Both my husband and I grew up in Texas, and we’re in the DFW area now. My husband is starting law school in the fall, so we’ll be moving out-of-state (probably) for a few years. I’m looking forward to a few years in a new place, but I do hope that we can settle in Texas, mostly because this is where our family is.

      Also, you forgot *amazing* margaritas. They’re just not the same anywhere else.

      • Bethany Ramos

        SERIOUSLY – I could have done 20 food/drink reasons alone.

    • Magrat

      Bluebell Dutch chocolate ice cream was made by gods.

      That said, a fair number of these are also available in California (the guacamole’s better, and instead of breakfast tacos we have breakfast burritos, which are far superior), without having to sign ownership of your or your daughter’s uterus to the state legislature. I love Austin, but I’m not moving back until that changes.

      • Paul White

        We’ve got breakfast burritos.
        I love a sirloin breakfast burrito

      • Magrat

        They’re not quite as ubiquitous, though. Or at least, I didn’t encounter them as much while I lived there.

      • Paul White

        I’m an unabashed addict so I may not be the best person to judge if we have more tacos or burritos…since I shamelessly seek out hte burritos.
        I just had a breakfast burrito for lunch in fact

    • CMJ

      My husband wants to move to Marfa.

      • Paul White

        It’s not a bad town but there’s not a decent grocery in it

      • Bethany Ramos

        I’ve heard Marfa is Hipster City, which could be a good or bad thing. :)

      • CMJ

        He went through there on a shoot with a band for a Jansport campaign….he basically said it’s this hipster enclave in the middle of nowhere. He liked it because it was just DGAF about everything.

      • Bethany Ramos

        Some friends of mine from high school managed a Raspa stand there. (snow cones) The utmost in hipster. ;)

      • CMJ

        Wow. I hope they live in a yurt too. :)

      • Justme

        My husband tried to move me to a 1A school in a town with one blinking light. As much as I wanted to help him follow his dream, I was terrified of being a liberal catholic in small-town Texas.

    • Taxes Make Kittens Cry

      #8 and #9 is the only things that matter ;P

      Gifs #13, #14 and #15 are racist

      Gif #18 is the funniest thing in the universe

      #20 lives mostly in NY :( and is married :( x 100

      • Valerie

        Because if she weren’t married a chaste courtship with a guy called Taxes Make Kittens Cry would so be happening.

      • Taxes Make Kittens Cry

        JayZ must go!

    • Paul White

      21: depending on where you live awesome wildlife (bear, gator, coyotes, all sortsa snakes, birds, fish)…and lots of hiking and outdoorsy stuff to do.

      • Taxes Make Kittens Cry

        Beth hates gators!!!

    • Taxes Make Kittens Cry

      I dunno about you, but I CAN’T WAIT for Maria (I HATE GUNS) Guido’s: 20 Reasons You Should Be Raising Your Kids In Florida” article

    • chickadee

      Oh dear. I really do like your posts, and I’m glad you like Texas, but I raised two daughters there (I am from the northeast), and there are some Texas-sized problems for girls. Of course, I was not born and raised there — I am a born and raised Yankee — so I have some biases.

      1. Stereotypes — Texas girls are “sweet” and “sassy” and “have to hide their brains so the boys will like them.” Both of my daughters went to a ranked school district and still encountered preferential treatment for boys in the classroom and ridiculous ideas about “what girls should be good at.”

      2. Classmates AND TEACHERS who spout conservative values and expect you to do the same. My daughters were in the margins regarding politics and particularly women’s rights.

      3. Jesus and birth control. They don’t go together unless you live in Austin. And there is a LOT of Jesus.

      4. Education. When I moved to Texas from my Yankee state, I was qualified to skip 2 grades based on my Yankee education. When we moved from Texas a couple of years ago, my younger daughter realized that her new school (the sole bright spot in a disadvantaged region) was light-years ahead of the “good” school she’d been to in Texas.

      5. The heat. My god, going outside from late May until early October is a nightmare.

      • Bethany Ramos

        I will give you #5 for sure. :-) I was actually waiting for someone with knowledge of the educational system to show up and tell me what’s up! Not sarcastic at all – my kids aren’t in school yet.

      • chickadee

        Well, you will have to fill in the blanks at home for sure. Remember, too, that the State Board of Ed wanted to adopt a science textbook that removed evolution and included creationism. They also have horrifying ideas about what should go in a history textbook — remove minorities and their perspective and include more about the Jesus-loving founding fathers.

        It varies from region to region, of course. I’ve lived in several areas of Texas, and you can find more liberal and diverse sections of the state. But the attitude towards women is difficult to wrangle. I spent my daughters’ formative years exposing them to NPR and my own politics.

      • Kat

        [For the record -- I am a social liberal and love NPR. When I'm not listening to audio books in the car, I'm jammin' to Morning Edition.]

        But … aren’t you essentially doing the same thing with your daughters that their friends’ parents are doing? Exposing them to your beliefs both via discussions and by what you choose to put on the radio when you’re in the car in the hope of influencing their opinions on thins? It’s just that you’re coming at it from a (and I’m inferring here…) more liberal point of view than your daughters’ classmates’ parents.

        I can’t speak to teachers spouting conservative beliefs. My teacher friends try to have neutral stances on politics while they’re in the classroom, but my friends are an admittedly small sample.

      • chickadee

        Absolutely I was (and am). My point is, though, that in our good school district, teachers and classmates felt completely confident in voicing pretty ugly beliefs — they felt that no one could or would object. Usually it was about Obama, birth control, abortion, feminism — all things I feel very strongly about. I know that no school system is perfect, and ugly attitudes exist other places, but I as amazed at the freedom that many teachers felt regarding expressing political stances.

      • Kat

        Ah, I see. That makes more sense. It is definitely easier to be more bold with your opinions on issues when you know you’re in the majority. Similarly, I’ve definitely held my tongue in polite company or a work environment when people say things I disagree with.

      • chickadee

        Indeed. And where we live now is worse. My youngest just relayed something she overheard a classmate say about a group of African-American classmates that made her want to vomit. She spoke up, but was appalled that someone could feel comfortable saying what he said.

        There are some terrific, lovely people in Texas, but they do tend to be in the minority in a lot of ways. If I could do it again, I would have moved the girls back home, but I wanted them to stay close to their father (we divorced).

      • chickadee

        Oh, and sex ed? Often is NO SEX FOR YOU THE END.

        But o how I miss Whataburger’s breakfast taquitos. And HEB. And tiny shacks where the best Mexican food lives. And hearing Spanish.

      • Paul White

        My wife was raised in Texas and is sweet and sassy,b ut damned if she hides her brain.

      • chickadee

        Well, mine didn’t either, but it isn’t a social asset in many areas.

      • Justme

        1. In 30 years of living here, I’ve never felt the need to hide my brain – but I also have equal-opportunity parents who always believed me to be just as strong, capable and independent as my brothers.

        2. In 24 years of public education, I’ve never had a teacher make any sort of reference to God, Jesus and the idea that Christianity is the only way.

        3. In my 13 years of being sexually active, I’ve never had a problem obtaining any form of birth control that I needed.

        4. Education depends on where you live..and just because textbooks are adopted doesn’t mean they are used as the Gospel truth. No science teacher I have ever had or currently know would dream of teaching the creationist theory as scientific fact.

        5. The heat is easily beat by pools, lakes, river and margaritas.

      • chickadee

        1. My eldest daughter is attending a large university in the state and is still appalled by the number of people who hate liberals, hate Obama (for poorly-articulated reasons) and think women should stick to majors that allow them to raise children. She doesn’t hide her brain by any means, but she comes in for more criticism for that than should be expected in 2014.

        2. You were seriously lucky, then. The only time I didn’t (but I’m old) was in college. And both daughters (as recently as 2011, in a 5-A school) encountered discussions of religion (Christianity on top) in history and literature classes — discussions that really left no room for dissent.

        3. But you’re okay with sex-ed being skewed towards abstinence-only in the junior-high and high schools?

        4. But the Board of Ed speaks to a creepy idea of the way that the state views what should be taught. ANd when like-minded teachers get their hands on that material, it makes for a very uncomfortable learning environment.

        5. I know I have issues with heat — I prefer snow to heat.

      • Justme

        2. I have a very Christian friend whose very Christian nephew was recently very uncomfortable in a senior level government class when debating abortion, pornography and other such topics because the vast majority of students were liberally minded – he as a conservative Christian was the line dissenter. Even the teacher was forthright about his own atheist beliefs.

        3. I was never taught abstinence only and my school district doesn’t teach it either.

        4. Like I said…I live in the metroplex and I think the adherence to certain beliefs as a valid educational curriculum are taught in the more isolated areas of the state.

      • chickadee

        I have lived in three areas of the state (none of them isolated), and I have to say that non-metro areas tend to be more similar to my experience. My sister taught in Houston, Austin, and a couple of smaller towns, and the only place that didn’t have abstinence-only was in Austin. I would like to see a breakdown by region and town size of abstinence-only education, since most of the people I know in and from Texas experienced that. My daughters definitely did.

      • Justme

        I never had any abstinence program and my school does a program that runs the full gamet – discusses the potential consequences of unsafe sex and what you can do to avoid them (condoms, birth control, abstinence, etc.). My mom was a Catholic youth minister and she didn’t even teach abstinence only…she taught a course on human sexuality to all freshmen enrolled in religious ed.

      • chickadee

        Well, all I can say is that I wish my daughters had been in your school.

      • Justme

        I’m not sure what opportunities you’re talking about?

      • chickadee

        Yeah, sorry — that’s pretty vague.

        Mostly, I am referring to the excellent sex-ed opportunities that your school offers. And the opportunity to attend a school with a more open attitude in general (which is what I am getting from your comments).

      • Justme

        Huh. I’m sorry you and your girls had that experience…I honestly never have experienced anything like that. I took Architectural Design (basically intro to autocad) my senior year and I was the one all the boys were asking for help.

        And to play devils advocate about the sex ed thing – if you are as connected to your daughters as you sound to be…wouldn’t you be instilling in them your own beliefs on the subject, therefore making the schools sex ed program a non-issue in regards to your daughter as sexual habits and decisions?

      • chickadee

        Of course I taught my daughters about sex — but I am thinking about the kids who don’t have parents who will do the same for them. My daughters’ friends came to me to ask questions about sex and birth-control, because the school merely showed pictures of venereal diseases and said don’t have sex, and they didn’t think their parents would be comfortable talking about it.

      • ALT19

        I’ve got to mostly agree with Justme, and this is coming from 27 year old born and raised in Houston (admittedly another, larger metro).

        1) I’m probably more on the sassy side with a touch of sweet, but I NEVER pretended to be stupid for anything, and I never felt like anyone around me favored males.

        2) People are conservative, and people are not conservative – I like to think I grew up seeing both sides with a strong ability to make my own decisions.

        3) It’s NOT just Austin. I have been on birth control for almost ten years with absolutely no problem whatsoever. And (at least in college) getting of Plan B was also zero problem. Sex ed was never abstinence only.

        4) I won’t get too into the education system – I know there are places in TX where it’s not so hot. I went to a great public school district and my public high school had the second largest number of National Merit Scholars in Houston, second to a prestigious private school.

        5) Man, better the heat than the polar vortex. Margaritas and Guadalupe tubing for the win.

        I know Texas ain’t perfect, but I also hate the large scale generalizations made about this state. It’s the second largest and second most populous state – it’s incredibly short-sighted to act like the entire state is homogeneous.

      • chickadee

        Yeah, I mentioned that metropolitan areas are more liberal, and since I just had this discussion with Justme, I’ll back off now. I didn’t live in small or rural or (necessarily) backwards towns, but the educational experience was not what I would choose for my daughters if I had it to do over. Texas is a big state, with many more medium-to-large towns than massive metropolitan areas.

        Sorry that I made too many generalizations. Those are the worst way to argue. But I have encountered far more conservative Texans than liberal Texans, and the Bush-Texans are peculiarly in-your-face about it, in my experience. I didn’t particularly enjoy living in Texas, but its size does give people more options for avoiding the less-desirable places.

      • ALT19

        Fair enough. Like I said, it ain’t perfect, but as a reasonably minded, educated, birth control using, moderate with both conservative and liberal leanings, the loudmouths who “define” Texas get me all rankled. You know how it is :)

      • Paul White

        I’m in Texas and got hit by that damn vortex. I feel ch eated

      • Natasha B

        I agree with you, more towards the southern state than just Texas-we lived in TN when I was in HS and college, and it was crazy. Batshit crazy. The football worship and and only dumb girls get a man culture was shocking. And I’ve only been out of HS 14 years, so it was not that long ago.
        Also, the plethora of deadly reptiles and amphibians that abound in the south make me appreciate the deep freeze that kills everything here even more :)

      • pixie

        I agree with the deep freeze killing everything, but having lived in North Western Ontario for four years, three hours north of Duluth, sometimes it’s just a wee bit too cold. ;)

      • Natasha B

        We’re about 3 hours south of Duluth haha. Yesss, January I’m honestly all ‘WHY DON’T WE LIVE IN TX,TN HAWAII WHHHHHYYY’

      • pixie

        Haha, oh how I’m glad to be out of that area. But this winter sucked for all of Ontario so I still didn’t escape the stupid cold.

    • pixie

      Hahaha. I just have to say, that is the greatest horseback riding gif I have EVER seen.

      And although I have had some spectacular falls, I am very glad I have never been taken out by a tree like that. Hit in the face by the ends of some branches because the horse I’m riding is a beast? Yes. But full on clotheslined? No.

      I think I’m just going to watch it over and over again now.

      • chickadee

        I went to Girl Scout Camp for 3 years (Texas) — the Horsewoman sessions — and I can tell you that riding into a mesquite tree is one of the suckiest things ever.

      • pixie

        I can only imagine.

        Plus it looks like the horse decided to be a bastard and run her into the tree. Hahahaha. Oh how I find asshole horses to be the best.

      • chickadee

        Asshole horses are the most fun to ride, because you can’t ride on autopilot.

      • pixie

        Exactly!
        I ride an incredibly lazy, fat, horse with a bit of an asshole streak to him. He doesn’t know how to buck or rear (like he actually can’t figure out how to do it, he’s tried and failed), but he’ll stop and cow kick, cut corners, and do other things like that (he rarely refuses jumps, though, thankfully). It would be a lot easier to ride one of the push-button horses, sure, but the one I ride teaches me a hell of a lot more.

      • Taxes Make Kittens Cry

        IKR! I swear that horse did that on purpose

    • Tea

      My Noes are simple. Reason 1: Albino. Reason 2. Gay, and very fond of joint health insurance, ambulance riding privileges, marriage benefits, safety, ect.

      The downside is I’m afraid if we raised kids in New England, they’ll end up like the New Englanders I deal with every day.

      • Paul White

        eh. AZ is better for arachnids

      • AE Vorro

        As a recovering New Englander, I have to say… run!

      • AE Vorro

        I’m kidding. Kinda. (I’m not really kidding.)

      • Tea

        We like it here, aside from the people, anyway. It’s way more awesome than Ohio was.

      • AE Vorro

        That’s not hard to believe.

    • Rachel Sea

      As long as you are white, heterosexual, cisgender, conservative, and Christian.

      • chickadee

        This is pretty safe to say unless you live in Austin or Galveston. I have family in both locations, and they are pretty laid back.

      • ALT19

        I’ll have to inform my liberal, homosexual friend who just moved back to Houston after an unhappy stint in San Francisco that this state is no good for him.

      • Rachel Sea

        I have family in Houston. The kids are in public school where they are taught that slavery was good, that god created everything, and that participants in the homosexual lifestyle are going to hell.

      • Paul White

        ? Really? Cause my brother did high school in Huffman (suburb) and got none of that…

      • Rachel Sea

        Current law gives teachers a lot of leeway, and textbooks change with the political climate.

    • Valerie

      I cannot stop laughing at the vagina spraying. I live in a coldish climate so sweaty vag is not really an issue here. I had no idea this was a thing and I am now mesmorized.
      And you find the absolute best GIFs. Ever.

      • Véronique Houde

        OMG as a pregnant lady, never has my bag been soooo sweaty all the time. And it’s the dead of winter up here in montreal. I need some vag spray man

      • pixie

        Completely random, but I visited Montreal a couple weekends ago to visit my mom (who’s working there at the moment) and thought of you! It was really, freakishly cold. Colder than Ottawa. I wanted to go to the nuit blanche thing, but we decided it was too damn cold. Spent many an hour wandering the underground shopping areas, though!

      • Véronique Houde

        WHAT!!! YOu should have told me! I would have brought you around town!!! Next time you have to promise you’ll let me know ;)

      • pixie

        Haha, I totally will!

    • SusannahJoy

      Being from CA, we took cheesy roadside pictures during poppy season. :)

    • Kara

      You could not pay me enough to move back to Texas. The people were nice, the barbeque was really really good but for the love of all that is holy the drivers were bat shit insane. Maybe it’s just San Antonio, I don’t know but it was terrifying there.

    • Boop

      Texas has one of the worst education records in the country. :(

    • SarahJesness

      Texas is pretty awesome, but the public school system actually kind of sucks overall.

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