Thanks to a little thing called Instagram, selfies have become big among the kids these days. Who am I kidding? Selfies are big with almost anyone that has a pulse and an Instagram account, including babies and grandmas. There’s even such a thing as the Selfie Olympics with the most RIDIC selfies you ever will see. If you’re up for a selfie challenge, strap a mattress onto your back, squeeze into your tiny bathroom, and give it a go.

For some reason, I’m not one for selfies. I have an Instagram account, but I use it to shamelessly post pictures of my kids because I like the lenses, and I don’t want to clog up my Facebook feed. I’ve never taken a selfie. Sure, I have pictures of myself that I use for my Facebook profile, but they are pictures that other people have taken of me doing something random, like attempting to drink a yard of beer gracefully.

I’ve also had two kids and have worked hard to stay in good shape. Go, me. You think I would be a candidate for the epidemic of post-pregnancy fitness selfies going around, but I’m not. IMHO, a post-pregnancy selfie shared with thousands of Instagram followers is the utmost in humble brags.

Some post-pregnancy selfie moms have received flak for it, like Caroline Berg Eriksen and Maria Kang. Eriksen posted a fairly controversial postpartum sexy selfie to Instagram just four days after giving birth. Granted, she has a fitness blog, so looking super-amazing-tastic after popping out a baby is her job. But I’ve seen the same behavior from other women on my Facebook and Instagram feeds.

Technically, Kang’s viral “What’s Your Excuse?” photo taken with her three kids was not a selfie, though she has posted plenty of other ripped selfies to social media. Kang recently sent us her 2014 Fit Mom Swimsuit Calendar to review. While I have to admit that the before and after mom transformations on each month are impressive and the calendar is chock-full of mom-friendly exercise and diet tips, it doesn’t make me love Kang’s braggy viral pic any more.

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On the one hand, this selfie phenomenon seems like a great self-esteem booster for a woman that is proud of her body after giving birth. Good for her. It’s a free world, and you can post any kind of selfie you want to your Instagram account. But I don’t have to like it.

I’m not a fan of post-pregnancy selfie humble bragging in any way, shape, or form. Whether you post an actual selfie of your six-pack abs after giving birth or casually humble brag about leaving the hospital weighing less than you did before you got pregnant, I just don’t see the point. Getting back to pre-baby weight is entirely personal, and most moms I know are already frustrated enough about it. Social media humble bragging doesn’t help.