familyMy husband and I both came from three kid families—religious families in the 80s, go figure. When we started talking about having kids of our own a few years ago, we were always stuck on the number three. We really didn’t give it a second thought. We also said that we wanted to have all of our kids close in age to get it over with and so that they could potentially be close growing up.

After we had our first son and realized what a baby was really like, we quickly shaved one number off our list. Two kids was fine, thanks! It’s not like my oldest son was a total monster or anything, but he definitely pushed the limits and gave us a crash course on how to be parents. Maybe that’s what you call “spirited” these days.

Our decision to only have two kids was about more than just crazy baby behavior. We started realizing that three or more kids would quickly outnumber two parents. We also talked about how it would be cheaper to go on family vacations and pay for college with just a family of four.

I know several large families via Facebook. A few of my friends have four or five children as they are approaching their early 30s. A large family has always mystified me, just because it’s never been something I wanted. Hell, my midwife had nine kids and was absolutely obsessed with babies. I always stared at her in awe and just wondered what she was thinking. I enjoyed my babies, but I don’t know if I could sign up for four or five of them, let alone nine.

After hashing out how many kids we wanted to bring into the world, I’m still intrigued by why parents decide to have a certain number of children. I know some pregnancies are unplanned, so there’s that. But I also really like hearing other people’s family planning stories.

It’s too late to sell me on the virtues of having a third child because my husband already had his vasectomy. (Yippee!) Still, I’d love to hear some reasoning behind this baby fever. I can’t see the appeal of more than two.

(photo: Getty Images)