• Sun, Jan 5 - 1:11 pm ET

Top 8 ‘Good’ Parenting Memes That Are Actually Pretty Questionable

In the internet era, the meme is king, as we’ve discussed before. There are memes about everything, and parenting is no exception. One type of meme I’ve noticed lately is the “Parenting: You’re Doing It Right” meme where typically, the parent is doing something awesome, or sweet, etc. Occasionally, it’s meant to be ironic and the parent is holding their kid over a window ledge, Michael Jackson style (but those aren’t the ones I’m talking about here).

While most of the “you’re doing it right” parenting memes are spot on, every once in a while I will come across one that just doesn’t seem right. Of course, this is totally subjective, and I fully expect some of these to cause a debate, but to me, these are less an example of good parenting and more a lesson is the ridiculous. Here are the top eight questionable good parenting memes I found online, and no, none of these seemed to be meant as ironic, at least not on the sites I found them on. Judge for yourself.

8. Then why bother with the sign?

questionable good parent memes (1)

Twitter

Did the lesson about not making a viral picture to ask for things need to be taught with a viral picture? I think not.

7. It’s funny…

questionable good parent memes (1)

9Gag.com

…until you realize that the kid will probably be peeing her bed until she is 20, dreaming about daddy in the computer again. Was all that therapy money worth the five minute laugh? Maybe

6. No. Just no. 

questionable good parent memes (1)

Pinterest

Because making fun of your kid (kids? it says kids, so I feel bad for whatever the other kid was made to wear) for wearing shit you made them up on. Klassy.

5. Harr Harr Harr

questionable good parent memes (1)

Faceook

Two for three with the gay jokes, #DoubleKlassy

4. At least they left a blanket

questionable good parent memes (1)

Facebook

This one bothers me more than it should. This is NOT good parenting, regardless of how many borderline sociopaths online say it is.Good parenting is setting boundaries and consequences BEFORE the kid breaks a rule. Not leaving him/her out on the porch to get mauled by a pack of rabid lemurs or whatever.

3. I was with her until the last line…

questionable good parent memes (1)

9Gag.com

That is TMI for pretty much everyone involved. He didn’t want you to write that and I didn’t want to read it. NOPE.

2. The classic shaming meme

questionable good parent memes (1)

Tumblr

This are awful. If the only punishment you can think of it “shame my kid in a grocery store parking lot” then you’re either I’ve run out of ideas you’re just an asshole.

1. DAFUQ did I just read?

questionable good parent memes (8)

Twitter

This sounds like a problem that could’ve been solved with, oh, I dunno, taking the existing Playstation away. Or literally anything besides being a sadist and “pretend” breaking it. WTF?

 

 

Share This Post:
  • Bethany Ramos

    My stepdad was very authoritarian, and I hate this shit. Yes, kids for sure need boundaries and discipline WITH RESPECT. I don’t appreciate “hilarious” disciplining strategies that wouldn’t be suitable for social situations IRL. I’ve never pranked anyone by smashing their favorite possession to teach them a lesson.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      Agreed! That one and the note telling the teenager to sleep outside really bugged me. Especially the note one, since you know the level of vitriol they would get if something horrible happened to the kid during the night. Why is it okay until something bad happens?

      When I was 17, I broke curfew three times in the span of about 6 months. The first time, I was grounded for a couple of days, since it was only by 30 minutes. The second time, I was late by an hour, and my TV was taken away AND I was grounded, the third time, all of the above and I had to drop out of one of my extra-curriculars. After that, I was much more careful and never broke curfew again. I learned way more than I would have by being out in the cold over night.

    • pixie

      I’ve had house keys since I was a small child, and while I know this isn’t the case with a lot of families (my boyfriend still doesn’t have his own house key and he’s 23…but then his parents barely ever lock their door), but I’ve just always thought, especially after my parents told me about Bernardo/Hamolka, that if a kid is old enough to go out and stay out late with friends, they should be old enough to have a house key. They can be lectured in the morning and have proper punishment then. My parents, even if they were in bed, always knew when I came home, and would have even if I hadn’t knocked on their bedroom door on the way by to let them know. I’m sure many parents are the same. I just don’t understand making a kid sleep outside, even in a safe neighbourhood.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      Agreed. My 10-year-old has keys, just in case, and she is never here alone yet, or out on her own very often (except to run to the store across the street). I think it’s good for her to learn the responsibility now. I had keys as a teen too. I got in trouble because my parents would be sitting there with an epic look for disappointment on their faces lol. I was never in danger of sleeping on the street.

    • pixie

      Ha, I’m trying to imaging that look. I never got the look of disappointment, but I did come home one night at 3:30 am and in the morning my mom did the big mom sigh was like “I think you should come home a little earlier next time” lol. (I didn’t really have a set curfew time, other than “not too late”, so I didn’t get in a lot of trouble, but that’s when I learned that 3:30 was considered “too late”)

    • gothicgaelicgirl

      yup. i got mine when I was 12.
      my mother decided if I was old enough to decide I wanted my ears and nose pierced and old enough to cook dinner (i loved cooking from a VERY early age), i was definitely old enough to have my house key

    • DatNanny

      Seriously. What is a parent teaching a child by locking them outside? What is the point of a curfew to them? To me, a curfew is the time you want your child home SAFE.

      If my parents locked me out of the house, I wouldn’t sleep on the porch. I would get back in the car of whoever was dropping me off and probably not bother to come back to the house in the morning. Locking your kid out shows it’s not their safety or wellbeing they’re concerned about.

    • Kiley

      If someone bad happened, non lethal, then the kids will definotely learned their lesson. ^.^

    • CMJ

      My dad actually DID smash my sister’s pager with a mini baseball bat….it was not a prank. :)

    • Bethany Ramos

      PAGER!!! :)

    • ElleJai

      The only time I’d smash anything is if they were posting truly awful things about me or someone else they were bullying, in which case I’d smash their computer, cut off the internet and have them in therapy within a day of finding out.

      I wouldn’t, however, be telling everyone about it because I’d be ashamed of having failed my children so badly that any of this was necessary.

      Luckily, my current child is a mere 18 months, so I have plenty of time to continue growing a proper,, respectful connection with him, by teaching him the boundaries and empathy for others.

      (Also I will provide the “I will smash it” warning when they get a computer/tablet so it wouldn’t come as any sort of shock if I actually did it.)

  • http://www.ambiencechaser.com/ Elizabeth Licata

    Dude, if my hypothetical kids could get a million likes on Facebook I would give them an American Girl doll and a subscription to Forbes. I suspect the ability to generate a picture that could get a million Facebook likes would benefit their futures more than me giving them $3 to do the dishes.

    • moonie27

      Not to mention – it is actually a lot of work to look good! Some of the million likes are just sheer dumb luck, but I feel like that attitude playing into the notion that it isn’t “real work” or that it’s super easy being either really, really, really good-looking or famous.

      Which is a HUGE problem, because we tell women all the time that it’s super important for them to look good and then when they succeed at it, we devalue it as not important, or not real work. When the actuality is that it takes a lot of work to be really, really, really good-looking.

      For all that Kim Kardashian is famous for being famous, I would bet that she works just as hard at looking good as I do at my job (and she sure as hell makes a lot more money doing so!)

  • CMJ

    The narcissism that comes from posting this shit everywhere on the internet is fucking staggering.

  • Justme

    I think the common thread through all of these parenting decisions is the fact that the parent chose to gleefully display their questionable parenting method on the internet. Some of these (the computer screen, the note by the sunglasses and the blankets on the porch) could be moderately funny and/or effective in person, depending on the existing relationship between the child and parent. But then to brag and gloat about it on the internet? That’s where it gets questionable for me.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      Totally agree. Honestly, I’m hoping some of these are fakes, but considering how many people who do this end up on TV, I’m sure many of them are real. It’s such a weird concept to me, whatever happened to keeping these issues private?

  • brebay

    These parents are bullies, and they’ll blame everyone but themselves when their kids are too.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      Agreed. Especially as someone who was bullied. The parents were always the bullying types too.

  • Bunny Lucia

    The mom who forced her daughter to hold that sign up in the parking lot is seriously asking for so much trouble. What happens when some sociopath drives by and throws something at her? What if someone hits her on accident? Seriously that mom is DUMB

  • Ginny

    If i’m not home by curfew, I get locked out of the house, regardless of my excuse. I’ve only ever been past curfew once, and that was because my phone’s clock was off. It was effing freezing out.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      This is not an okay thing. I was late quite a few times as a teen, and I paid the price. But not by sleeping on the street.

    • footnotegirl

      This is so not okay, and in point of fact if you are under 18, it is actually illegal for your parents to do.

  • lauren

    The ‘Sleep on the porch’ one is horrendous. In the early 90′s there was a serial rapist and murderer named Paul Bernardo in southern Ontario (St. Catarines area) and one of his victims, Leslie Mahaffy, was locked out of her house because she missed curfew. He raped and tortured her. That is something that her parents will have to live with for the rest of their lives. A simple decision on their part changed her entire life.

    • missiemeghan

      I was just about to post that! I remember when that happened. Her poor parents! That stayed with me to this day.

    • CW

      I’m thinking there is some regional vocab that is being misunderstood. To me, “sleep on the patio/porch” means sleep in one of those enclosed rooms off the back of the house with a door that can be locked from the inside. It would be uncomfortable but not unsafe like sleeping outside would be.

    • Lackadaisical

      Quite probably, where I live houses don’t have rooms that you can shelter in safely while keeping the rest of the house locked off from it. I had assumed some kind of raised decking with a bit of a roof as sun/rain protection because my concept of a porch/patio you can sleep on comes entirely from watching American TV and films. Our weather is often dreary but rather mild compared to the rest of the world and as we are a small, densely populated island we have houses crammed in with little space for front or back porches. When we have them (as I do) then are far too small for that and tend to be just big enough for storing wellies and umbrellas. Your interpretation makes more sense.

    • lauren

      Maybe, and really in 99% of cases this would just be a punishment with no ill effect (ie, typically you wont get murdered) but, and I may be reading too much into this, if it was a sunroom type en closer someone would probably say “Sleep IN the…” as opposed to ‘Sleep ON the….”

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      I was thinking this too. As someone who’s lived in Florida, an area famous for enclosed porches, I assumed the same, since my grandparents would always say “sit IN the sunroom or porch, not ON.

    • koolchicken

      It may be regional. I’m from New England and we’d say sleep in the sun room but on the porch. Sometimes the porch is screened in (very common but they aren’t all that way) other times they’re open air. Screened in ones have a locking door, my grandparents (both sets) and my aunt have/had ones with real (not just flimsy cheap) doors that you needed a proper key to open. I’d like to hope the kid either got home on time or slept in one of those enclosed ones.

    • Rachel Sea

      Where I life a patio is generally an unroofed slab of concrete, pavers, or decking. A porch is the unenclosed, roofed or unroofed area immediately outside the front or back door.

      Judging by the front door, I’m guessing they live in a nice suburb (that glass would not survive a not-nice neighborhood), which means sleeping on the patio is probably safe enough, but not comfortable.

    • pixie

      Where I am (Ontario), a porch is out front of a house by the front door, usually with steps leading up to it and may or may not have a roof over top. Usually it’s not enclosed. Out the back of the house is the deck if it’s raised, or patio if it’s not. Enclosed rooms like you’re talking about are sun rooms or mud rooms.
      Hurray for regional differences in vocab.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      I saw a show on TV about that case. I think that was in the back of my mind as I wrote this. Seriously, that particular note inspired this whole piece.

    • gothicgaelicgirl

      yeah my mom had one rule when I was a teen- stay out as late as you like, as long as you text me where you are.
      come home any time you like, just do not wake me.

      which was a pretty fair rule. if i had plans to go anywhere, i would write down the contact number of the house/club and an emergency contact if my mam couldnt reach me (like another two friends numbers)

      I woke her ONCE when I was 16, coming home from a party at about 1.30am, dying with drink.
      Her lesson?- hoovering my room at 6am.

      Sure taught me a lesson!!!

    • Deb

      Humanity, bye bye

    • gothicgaelicgirl

      “Humanity, bye bye”?
      Care to elaborate?

    • Karen Milton

      I was going to post the very same thing! I live fairly close to St. Catharine’s and we all had this story mashed into our brains at the time this happened.

    • El

      How common do you think serial killers are?

  • Kay_Sue

    The strategies in and of themselves are questionable, but the most questionable part of it all is the attention it’s given. Most especially when the attention is because the parents themselves post it online.

    I guess I’m a bit of a private person to some degree, but parenting is typically not something I want to publicize. I may call my mom for advice, or talk it over with my best friend (she doesn’t have kids, and her insight is priceless), but I don’t understand the need to publicize it like that. Is it for the validation? Or are we just still perpetually stuck in middle/high school, seeking the approval of those that think like us, and now our kids are the victims?

  • jane

    When my daughter was in the midst of the terrible-horrible-atrocious threes (maybe she was four, but the threes were still going on, if you know what I mean) she was big into throwing tantrums. Like throw herself down on the floor, kick, scream, yell cry tantrums. They were awful. Once I videotaped her doing it. The next day, when she was calm, I said “I want to show you something” and I showed her the video. I said “this is what you look like when you throw a tantrum.” Even at that young age, she was MORTIFIED. She asked me to delete the video and she, hand to god, never threw another tantrum like that again. So “unconventional” consequences can be effective.

    The key difference here, though, is that I respected my daughter enough to not plaster that lesson all around the internet. I didn’t post the video. I deleted the video entirely. She was ashamed, but of her _behavior_ not of the publicity. Parent your kids, for heaven’s sake, don’t use them as props in the game of “parenting.”

    • Lackadaisical

      If you didn’t show it to someone else and didn’t mock or laugh at her while she watched then you are not anything like these parents. It is the public shaming and the pleasure in the kids emotional distress that makes these chilling, not the making the kid aware of their behaviour

    • Tinyfaeri

      This – Jane didn’t publically shame her, she just showed her that her actions were not appropriate in a way that she otherwise wouldn’t have understood.

    • ChillMama

      Last line of your post: fantastic! You hit the nail on the head. I think it is so distressingly narcissistic.

    • Alicia Kiner

      A-freaking-MEN. Love that idea, by the way!

    • jane

      Thanks. It really was surprisingly effective. I am seriously considering recording the horrible whining voice and seeing if it works as well.

    • ted3553

      argh! whiny voice makes me want to choke the whiner. I would rather have a temper tantrum than hear that

    • AugustW

      I do this with my phone and my daughters tantrums. She will usually stop just to look at herself on the screen.

  • Lackadaisical

    If I try number 4 on any of my kids when they are old enough for it I suspect that they might escalate it by calling the police because if a kid is young enough to have a key and no front door key I am fairly sure I would get a stern talking to from the authorities for that. If your kid is old enough that you are legally allowed to force them to sleep in the garden with a blanket then why on earth are you treating them like a kid with a curfew and no key. It can’t be that you are worried about what might happen to them if you can go to sleep before they return leaving them locked out with only a blanket.

    • Kay_Sue

      My mom was always strict about curfew because she literally couldn’t sleep until we were home. Even after I no longer had a curfew, I still came home at a reasonable hour because I knew she worried.

      She never locked us out (because, like you pointed out, if we were old enough to be out, we were old enough to have a house key)–she was open and honest about how she reacted to it, and she was clear about the consequences (a serious loss of privileges) and between the two strategies, it worked. My parents were also good about giving us space–if I called and said, “Hey, I didn’t realize the time, I am going to be 15 minutes late (or 30 or an hour),” they were okay with that.

      I can’t see how, first, locking your child outside in the elements, and second, putting on the internet for everyone to see would be nearly as effective. Honestly, I’d have taken that as an excuse not to come home if I was breaking curfew. I’d have stayed at a friend’s, or somewhere else.

    • Name

      Locking a kid out of the house for missing curfew has also led to at least one murder, as in the case of Leslie Mahaffy. I can’t believe anyone would really think it was a good idea to lock their child out of the house all night.

    • moonie27

      Eh, where I grew up it wouldn’t be that big of a deal. Most of the houses were pretty isolated and off the beaten path – and if it was in the backyard, even less of a big deal.

      I never got a key to our house because we have never locked it in the nearly 20 yrs we’ve lived there. Whenever it was locked, everyone would end up locked out or crawling in through windows until my dad came home and now I’m pretty sure nobody even carries a copy of the key.

    • brebay

      I thought of Leslie too. There has to be better privileges to take away than this.

    • Lackadaisical

      Absolutely, if she was upset about you being out because she was worried then she couldn’t have locked you out as she would be terrified of something happening while you were locked out or terrified that the delay was due to something nasty happening. My parents were the same in that we could be as late home as we liked so long as we called them if we would be later than expected. This note is all about not being inconvenienced with waiting around for late kids you don’t trust with a key and proving you are the boss. I had a key to the family house at 11 (start of secondary school) as I walked home from school and there was always a chance that my father might not be back from picking my brother up from primary school.

    • gothicgaelicgirl

      my mom is probably one of the most understanding people in the world.
      a close friend of mine was going through a miscarriage and was alone
      she knew what was happening as it was her third.
      I was scheduled to fly to paris with my mom the next morning, but instead I went to her in the early hours of the morning, in tears, and asked could she drop me to my friends house as she was alone. the hospital had told her she;’d be better in the comfort of her home and come in to them after.

      not only did my mother drop me over right away, she transferred the plane tickets so that my friend and I could go instead, a month later.

  • http://www.benwhoski.com/ Benwhoski

    These are all questionable, but am I the only one really thrown by #2? Even if I thought the punishment methods in 4 and 3 (as an example) are inappropriate, It at least still understand why the parent was angry enough to think something “drastic” was warranted. The twerking thing? If this is how she punishes her daughter for dancing in a way she finds inappropriate, I can’t even imagine what her punishment for more serious infractions would be.

    Number 5 seems weird to me too. Even aside from the gay jokes, it really made me think “Oh NO! Not a GIRL! In the HOUSE! Don’t you know what those do the furniture!?”

    Also, if your son is old enough to be wanting to bring girls home with him, you are not going to get him to take you seriously by being a grown adult who uses terms like “pee-pee”.

    • Kay_Sue

      My issue with #2 and #5 was almost the same, at least generally: Is shaming your kids about sexuality really the best way to get through to them? Somehow, I don’t think so.

    • CrazyLogic

      Honestly, the object with the note “is this yours? No? You know the rules, tell us when you bring your girlfriend home.” Worked on my brothers until High School was over. Not posted to the internet, just informing them they were caught.

      They had to repeat it with the oldest one though, for a different matter. “Don’t leave your used condoms where you little sister can find them. You have a garbage can.”

      For some reason, he was mad at -me- for that one.

    • Kay_Sue

      That’s different, though. To me, that isn’t shaming–that’s reminding them what the rules and expectations are. It’s different from saying “you are either gay or you showed a girl your pee-pee.” One is parenting, the other is middle school playground stuff.

    • CrazyLogic

      True. Didn’t stop them from claiming it was “public humiliation” because they left it in the kitchen where us other two siblings could see it.

      Not the condom one though. That was left on his bed.

    • Kay_Sue

      I can see being ashamed of it, but, as a parent, I definitely don’t see it on this level of shaming. You should show them these and remind them that at least it wasn’t all over the internet! ;)

    • CrazyLogic

      I showed them the locked outside one. We’re trying to figure out if that’s on our old house or not…

  • Blueathena623

    For number 2 — remember when Elvis first became super popular and TV stations would only show him from the waist up because people thought his pelvis gyrations were too suggestive? And how the tango as considered too raunchy for a long time because the partners held each other close as they danced?
    Now I want to put on a really big dress and stand by an intersection with a sign along the lines of “I was disrespecting my family by participating in the fox trot at my cotillion.”

    • CMJ

      When I was in high school it was “freak dancing.” If anyone did it they got yelled at and were told to “leave room for the holy spirit.”

    • Blueathena623

      Speaking of freak dancing — the little-known alternative ending to Dirty Dancing put Baby on the corner . . . of 3rd and Lexington, where she held up a sign to be publically shamed.

    • Kay_Sue

      I missed that.. Was it in the special features? ;)

    • ElleJai

      Bahaha. Reminds me of the rule that you must be able to fit a copy of the Bible between you while dancing, otherwise you’re too close.

    • March

      Yeah, but what Bible? I mean, I have a half-an-inch-wide edition of the New Testament (I guess it’s from the Giddy ‘Uns) somewhere. Plenty you can do while dancing with that thing still holding up between my tits and his pecs.

    • ElleJai

      Must be at all points along your body (so no squishing) – the Nuns or teachers would literally walk around randomly shoving a Bible between couples to ensure distance. Then take it back and harass someone else.

      I also like to imagine either the large print, hand copied or Braille versions.

    • ChillMama

      I think I would pay to see that (someone holding that sign). Too funny.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      “Now I want to put on a really big dress and stand by an intersection with a sign along the lines of “I was disrespecting my family by participating in the fox trot at my cotillion.”

      If you do this, and I shit you not, and you can prove that it’s you, I will (once again, NOT KIDDING) give you $20 bucks. Via PayPal or whatever. Seriously. I have a birthday in April.

      I mean it.

      Please?

    • Blueathena623

      I need a Little house on the prairie equivalent, since I have a prairie outfit that might still fit. Some sort of dance at a barn raising or something.

    • Rachel Sea

      I just washed my Victorian dress to put it back in storage, but I may need to stage this before it goes back in the bin.

    • Rachel Sea

      “We remarked with pain that the indecent foreign dance called the Waltz was introduced (we believe for the first time) at the English court on Friday last … it is quite sufficient to cast one’s eyes on the voluptuous intertwining of the limbs and close compressure on the bodies in their dance, to see that it is indeed far removed from the modest reserve which has hitherto been considered distinctive of English females. So long as this obscene display was confined to prostitutes and adulteresses, we did not think it deserving of notice; but now that it is attempted to be forced on the respectable classes of society by the civil examples of their superiors, we feel it a duty to warn every parent against exposing his daughter to so fatal a contagion.” – The Times of London, 16th July 1816

  • Kelly

    I just have to shake my head at this trend of publicly humiliating children. My parents were huge fans of that parenting “style” and guess what happened? I can no longer be humiliated. I’m at the point where nothing bothers me anymore.

    It’s good in some ways. I’ve had a successful career in the adult industry due to my complete lack of shame and modesty caused by my parents abuse. (Oh, and it is abuse to constantly publicly humiliate your kids, don’t even kid yourself about that.)

    I’m not sure that’s what they were aiming for but that’s what they got. Parents should think long and hard about what they’re doing to their kids when they pull these stunts.

    • Lackadaisical

      Not that you have anything to be ashamed of, but probably the opposite of what they intended your life to be when they first decided to control you by shame. I hope they grew up and learned to support you and be less manipulative eventually but it sounds unlikely from the way you write. You might still have chosen the same career if they chose to build you up by showing pride in you instead but they would have had a better relationship with you today.

    • Kelly

      Yeah, I’m pretty sure it’s the opposite of what they were going for. We have no relationship now.

      I don’t think I would be able to do the things I’ve done if I hadn’t endured their abuse. I was very private as a child and remember sobbing as they humiliated me but over the years it got easier and easier to take until it had no effect.

      I’ve made the most of it but my ability to be embarrassed has been totally eradicated. If it hadn’t, I don’t think I could have gone into the adult industry at all. Not that I think there’s anything wrong with it, I just think it would have bothered me.

  • guest

    How is being friends with Elton john a gay joke? Straight people and gay people can be friends. Welcome to 2014

    • Gangle

      This is all very true, but in this sort of gay ‘joke’, when someone says you are a friend of Elton John/Ellen/Stephen Fry etc they are implying that you are also gay by association. It isn’t a very *good* joke but there you have it. Morons will think anything is funny.

    • staferny

      I think the originator of this is referring to the sunglasses being blinged out with rhinestones and Elton John has many pairs of flashy glasses, not anything to do with being gay. Like, if someone found a meat dress at my house and asked if I was friends with lady gaga…

    • moonie27

      If someone finds a meat dress at your house, I hope to heck they have bigger questions than “are you friends with lady gaga?”

    • Justme

      They’ll probably be looking for your pit of despair and a creepy collection of lotion bottles. And we mustn’t forget about a yapping bichon frise.

    • staferny

      Sounds wierd now but when I’m trapped on a mountain after a plane crash, we’ll see who’s going to be begging for a bite of my meat dress instead of chewing on the flight attendants right arm.

    • Bethany Ramos

      I really lolled at this comment!

    • http://www.benwhoski.com/ Benwhoski

      Context matters. If the Elton John bit wasn’t directly following an overt gay joke (and here, the parent definitely appears to be implying that the kid would find the connection to homosexuality insulting or, at least, embarrassing), I’d probably agree with you.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      It was the tone of the sentence in the situation plus the first mention of homosexuality. Obviously.

  • LiberalGilt

    First gay marriage, then this.

    • Troll_Detection_System

      Really, get over it. Posting this off topic line all over the comment sections of multiple blogs, etc is just m0rr0nic.

    • LiberalGilt

      The really amusing part that you are too stoopid to realize is this — you are proving YOU are the troll AND you are also showing you are pathetic and have no life.
      I find it hilarious.
      Keep entertaining me, puppet.. You’re my puppet troll.

    • Troll_Detection_System

      Snort . . . (sounds familiar ?)

      Now let’s get some IP . . . that’ll be hilarious, no ?

  • CrazyLogic

    …that curfew one…I know that door. No…can’t be. But that reflection looks…

    Guys, I think that one is from the house I grew up in…that kind of sounds like what the people who bought it would do too…

    Either that, or they these people have the exact same door as we did and a red brick house across the street too…

    • CrazyLogic

      Just showed my brother, he agrees with me.

  • Renee J

    I wonder what the curfew parents would do if their kid spent the night at a friend’s house because the door was locked.

    • Jallun-Keatres

      My then-boyfriend-now-husband got locked out of his house twice because he had no key (9 kids = no time/money/reason to make spares) and they were all asleep; knocking on the window didn’t wake them up. The first time he slept in his car for an uncomfortably cold night (always in winter this happens lol) and the second time he went back to my house and my parents were awoken by a call at 3am from his irate dad looking for him. He got a key after that.

  • ChillMama

    And we wonder why kids think it is ok to bully and humiliate their peers on social media. Where could they possibly be learning such behaviour?!*

    *yes, that last point was sarcasm

  • whiteroses

    I’ve always subscribed to the school of thought that if you wouldn’t show this level of disrespect to your spouse, you shouldn’t do it to your child. I wouldn’t lock my husband out of the house- but we would have a serious conversation about the disrespect that comes from not showing up when you say you’re going to. I don’t see why that’s different with a teenager.

    If your brand of effective parenting involves publicly humiliating/making fun of your child, chances are pretty decent that you’re not a good parent.

    • Mellie

      Yes, because only a bad parent would be even capable of making an 11 year old that twerks.

    • whiteroses

      Pretty sure I didn’t say that. But if your eleven year old twerks and your response is to publicly humiliate them, what is that teaching them? I wouldn’t post pictures of my husband online with signs saying “I didn’t pick up my socks so I’m grounded”. We would have a conversation about why that’s sucky behavior, then move on with our lives.

      I can’t think of a single “lesson” something these memes passes along, unless the “lesson” is that you can’t be trusted to make mistakes without your parents blabbing it to the entire world. The Internet is permanent, and these parents haven’t thought about the fact that this stuff will follow their kids around. We worry about kids posting their entire lives online- how is this better?

  • Jallun-Keatres

    I love posts like this, because it sheds light on views I completely fail to consider.

  • Roberta

    #8 really just baffles me, and irritates me too. First of all, there is no context. As far as we know, she is just using her kids to make a point of how good a parent she is by not using facebook to be popular and making her kids apparently earn something. Why bother roping her kids into her own shit? That is stupid.

    As for locking your kid out, I have big issues about that, but that is because my mom’s friend was locked out once, by accident, and nearly lost his fingers because of the frostbite. Frankly, he should have been taken to the hospital. Since then it has been drilled into my head to never lock a family member out, no matter what the circumstances.

  • darras

    #6 – how do you know that kid didn’t want to wear the pink dance outfit? My brother insisted on wearing a pink tutu with a backwards baseball cap for a while when he was nine. He said he was being the ‘rock fairy’. He’s straight (in so far as I’m aware) now in his thirties, so I doubt it’s indicative of anything at that age. Dance boy might have loved that pink outfit! What I take issue to is a child that old having a dummy/pacifier in photographs. Seems a little unnecessary.. But perhaps that is more of an inflammatory opinion. :(

  • VA Teacher

    I think #7 is hilarious. It’s exactly the sort of humor my family used and we have no idea how old the daughter is.

  • gothicgaelicgirl

    I went through a really stroppy phase at 8, where if I didn’t get my way, I would flounce out of the room in a huff, i even did it in front of mt mother’s parents once.
    She did the exact same to me a few days later when I brought friends home.
    She asked me to put plates out and I said no. she flounced out of the room, tossing her hair and mumbling under her breath EXACTLY like I did.

    My father gave out murder to her over it but it certainly taught me a lesson.
    Once I saw how it looked to someone WATCHING ME, I saw how rude and childish it was and it convinced me to stop.

    I don’t think my mom made a bad choice, I think she chose a good way for me to see how unpleasant it could be, being around me when I was in a mood.

  • Rachel Sea

    What kid, upon getting locked out, wouldn’t find somewhere else to stay? Come home on time or not at all? When I was a teenager, most kids I knew would take that as an invitation to stay out all night, every night.

  • SusannahJoy

    The fake playstation one confuses me. So, ok, you pretend to smash their beloved playstation. They get all sad and upset. Then you reveal that you didn’t really, so they still have it. What do they learn from that? The most obvious lesson to me is that they can do whatever they want, and not get punished, and that mom and dad are liars.

  • WashedUpPunkRockMomma

    You all do of course know that # 4 was an ELF ON THE SHELF related note right? Of Course you don’t, it must be a BAD mother.

  • WashedUpPunkRockMomma

    Ok Ladies, # 4 is a ELF ON THE SHELF note. Left for an ELF, not a child, not a teenager, not a college student staying out too late but in fact a stuffed ELF.

  • El

    Two of these were not fails, or at least not much. The curfew one I laughed at. If I did that my kids would never do that again, though I hope I don’t fail that badly I’d produce kids who’d event hink of that. The other ones, except for the computer one I’d use depending on how much I hate my kids. Btw 11 year olds shouldnt know what twerking is. Wow, just wow, america.