• Wed, Dec 11 - 12:00 pm ET

(Updated) Kissing A Classmate On The Hand Got This First Grade ‘Sexual Offender’ Suspended

6 Year Old Suspended For Kissing ClassmateThere should be a way we can get these extremely overzealous school officials who suspended this first grader for kissing his “girlfriend” on the hand to swap places with all of the school officials in high schools and colleges who are reluctant to report actual crimes of rape. Can we do a swapsies on this?

Little six-year-old Hunter Yelton has been suspended from school in Canon City, Colorado for kissing his “girlfriend” on the hand. His mother, Jennifer Saunders, claims her son and his friend refer to themselves as boyfriend and girlfriend and are good pals in first grade. This is the second time Hunter has kissed his friend, the first time was on the cheek (and touched her hand) and now the school has suspended him and included the term “sexual offender” in his school records. From KRDO.com:

“She was fine with it, they are ‘boyfriend and girlfriend’. The other children saw it and went to the music teacher. That was the day I had the meeting with the principal, where she first said ‘sexual harassment’. This is taking it to an extreme that doesn’t need to be met with a six year old. Now my son is asking questions… what is sex mommy? That should not ever be said, sex. Not in a sentence with a six year old,” said Hunters’ mom, Jennifer Saunders.

 

Hunter’s opinion on the case is:

“It was during class yeah. We were doing reading group and I leaned over and kissed her on the hand. That’s what happened,” said Hunter Yelton. ”They sent me to the office, fair and square. I did something wrong and I feel sorry,” he said.

What I don’t get is why they couldn’t call the parents of the other student in this case along  into the office and discuss this before suspending Hunter, for what looks like to me was a simple act of affection between little kids. It wasn’t like he was behaving in an overtly sexual or harassing manner. I’m all for schools discipling kids who display aggressive acts towards other students, or who show signs of not understanding boundaries, or who act in ways that can be interpreted as sexually harassing, but kissing another student on the hand just doesn’t seem like a grave offense to me. If you want to see a video of this dangerous criminal, you can hop on over here. In the video the mom admits that Hunter has had issues with being disruptive in class, but I side with Hunter who says “Six year olds? They have a lot of energy.”

There are so many things to get upset over in this world. There are kids who are bullied physically and mentally ever day, and rape cases where we all have the victims involved in the case receive more harassment than the perpetrators. It scares me that we live in a world where a tiny kid can get labeled an offender for kissing a friend on the hand, when we have so many serious crimes that are basically met with a slap on the hand.

UPDATED: 

Some of our readers found another article after my original article was published, which explains more of the “victims” side of the story via her mom. Via the Canon City Daily Record:

The girl’s mother, Jade Masters-Ownbey, spoke out on a Facebook page and gave permission to the Daily Record to publish her response.

“Not once, but over and over…not with her permission but sneaking up on her…not without warning and consequences prior to suspension,” she stated.

Superintendent Dr. Robin Gooldy said under the district’s sexual harassment policy, the fourth definition fits both circumstances, which reads, “Unwelcome touching, such as patting, pinching or repeated brushing against another’s body.”

Ownbey stated there originally were two boys who had “kept her (daughter) from playing with other kids and fought with each other.”

“After they got in trouble, one boy stopped but the other boy apparently didn’t get it,” she stated. “I had to put restrictions on her about which she was allowed to be around at school. I’ve had to coach her about what to do when you don’t want someone touching you, but they won’t stop.”

 

So, there is more to the story, as I think we all assumed. I still stand by my original opinion, the boy should be disciplined, but labeling him a sex offender is a bit extreme. In my opinion.

(Image: KRDO.com)

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  • ted3553

    This is out of whack. There seems to be a trend moving to this type of zero tolerance. We have everything outlined so no one has to stand up for or justify or explain the reasons they made decisions. We can’t regulate everything, we have to allow people to use reasoning and if we still feel they made the wrong decision, we have to discuss it.

  • EmmaFromÉire

    Please, if this is sexual assault, then my primary school’s epic games of ‘Kiss Chasing’ were nothing short of orgies.

    • Rachel Sea

      We called it kissy-tag and it was the single most popular game amongst kids who had recently discovered that boys can catch cooties from girls.

    • Lackadaisical

      My kids’ school (England) bans all kissing so no kiss chase here. They just find it easier to have a blanket rule of no kissing to enforce then having to figure out whether both parties are happy with it and where to draw the line. Kissing would definitely not get you suspended though, you would be asked to stop, be warned to stop and then your name moved down from the green zone to the amber zone on the dreaded behaviour chart if you persisted. At most they would be looking at a missed playtime for not doing what the teacher said (stopping when told) rather than actually for kissing (unless the other person obviously didn’t want to be kissed). You need to do a fair bit more than kiss someone on the hand to be sent to the headmistress’ office.

      I despised the game as a kid because I really didn’t fancy any of the boys so found the idea of kissing them yucky, yet also had the humiliation of them not wanting to kiss me either so blatantly most of the time no-one trying to chase me anyway.

  • wonderstruck

    At first i was thinking major overreaction, but after reading some of the articles I can see the school’s point of view a bit more. As you mentioned, 6 year olds are old enough to be learning boundaries – and this isn’t the first time this kid has been caught kissing girls at school, but mom is saying that it’s totally fine and there’s nothing wrong with him showing affection at school. Sounds like the school needed a harsher punishment to try to get the message to mom that it really isn’t fine. Obviously that didn’t work since she just decided to take it to the news instead.

    I’s be curious to know if they actually put sexual harassment on his record (which would be an overreaction), or if mom is just flipping out because the principal used that term at all. I’d be curious to hear what the little girl had to say, since I’m not sure I trust that the mom isn’t twisting the story here, and it’s pretty clear from some of the quotes in the article that she coached her son on what to say to the reporters.

    • elle

      Ok so somebody else does agree with me. Yeah anytime only one person comments to the media I think some red flags should definitely be raised and we shouldn’t necessarily take their story at face value. I also hate that Hunter did sound kinda coached….some of those quotes didn’t sound like normal kid speech.

    • wonderstruck

      Yeah, I think I’m biased because my mom is a teacher – but they’ve had parents go to the school about punishments and straight up lie about the circumstances and ended up with it in the paper or whatever, and the school can say absolutely nothing to contradict it all because of confidentiality reasons. Lame.

    • elle

      Yeah my sister is a teacher too. Hearing many of her stories has definitely colored my perception!

    • Life-Sized Mommy

      When I saw this story on the news this morning, the statement from the school said something along the lines of, “protecting a student from continued unwelcome contact”. In the story I saw, there was none of the girlfriend/boyfriend talk, and it sounded like either the girl or the girls’ parents had expressed a prior wish for the contact to stop. So, while I think the “sexual harassment” label is a bit harsh, I can understand using the suspension to send a message that you do NOT touch people against their wishes.

    • LiteBrite

      I don’t necessarily disagree with you either. My first thought when I read this was “Why did it even get to this point?” I agree that a kiss on the hand or the cheek is most likely just likely a six-year-old showing affection (My son is six. He’s a hugger, and I could see him doing something like this), but if the school said it needed to stop then the parents needed to make sure that happened.

      I agree being labeled a sex offenders are overreactions (if that is indeed what happened), but at the same time it shouldn’t have got to this point at all.

  • Rowan

    So if some drunken bloke sticks his hand up my skirt on the Tube and I kick him in the nuts, I’m overreacting and/or should be flattered; yet if my 7yo son kisses his girlfriend on the cheek, he’s harrassing her? Oooooookay.

    • guest

      Well, technically if he has been warned about the behavior previously, then yes it is harassment. Someone touching you inappropriately is either assault or sexual assault. There is a very easy way to deal with this problem. When I was 7 or 8, I had a problem with a little boy in my class, told my parents and they talked to the teacher. Didn’t solve the problem, but slugging the kid in the face in front of the entire class? That kid never bothered me again.

  • elle

    I’m absolutely confident I will get eviscerated in the comments for this but…..I kinda see where the school is coming from. In the linked article it states that he has been suspended before for roughhousing/kissing the same girl before. This kid maybe has some boundary issues. I would hesitate to call it sexual harassment but all we have is hunters mom saying it is a “mutual crush”. I would be interested to he a what the patents of the girl think about the whole thing. I don’t think I’d be too thrilled about some little boy kissing my (hypothetical) daughter in school even if it was a mutual crush. And I definitely wouldn’t be thrilled about my son doing it either…

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      I have no issue with the kid being disciplined, but being labeled a sex offender for kissing a girl on the hand is extreme.

    • elle

      On the one hand I think sexual harassment labels on 6 year olds are a little extreme but on the other hand seeing this is his second time and to the same girl I can also see where that may have been the schools only option. Unfortunately the district can’t comment so we won’t get to know the reasoning behind it.

    • Rachel Sea

      Like heck it was their only option. Disciplining him, not letting him sit next to her, making him clasp his hands to keep them to himself, practicing impulse control with the school counselor…there are innumerable ways to address inappropriate behavior that stop miles short of calling a kid a sex offender.

      Plenty of kids don’t learn to follow a rule the first time it is addressed. They are kids, they test boundaries by doing.

    • elle

      I said it may have beenHunterly option. And since neither you nor I were there and the only informationWe have is coming from Hunter parents we can’t say wether or not any other type of punishment/deterrent was tried. I will also repeat that I am uncomfortable labeling a kid a sexual harraser.

    • elle

      Their only option, my tablet is making interesting autocorrect t decisions.

    • DeanaCal

      Eve, I totally agree with your statement, but here’s my question – what proof do we have that the boy was “labeled a sex offender?” Like others have said, we only have the mom’s side of the story. Is she the one saying that he was labeled that?

    • raymond

      wont the principal approve it thou

    • EmmaFromÉire

      That’s my issue too- I think it’s entirely the wrong term for this situation. Yes he was inappropriate, but to label him a sex offender is unbelievable- it literally puts him in the same category as rapists and flashers.

    • Kay_Sue

      I don’t know that suspension was appropriate, or the label of sexual harassment. It seems extreme for a six year old. Not only does he miss out on valuable time in the classroom when he isn’t a danger to himself or others, but he’s internalizing a message that isn’t clear to him at this age. That alone seems to suggest that he doesn’t fully understand the punishment or why he is being punished.

    • Life-Sized Mommy

      On the news story I saw this morning a statement from the school said the “continued physical contact” was “unwelcome by the other student”. So, however innocent his intentions, there is a real possibility that his behavior was harassment, especially since it’s only his mom saying that the girl is his “girlfriend”. I agree that I would love to hear the other parents’ side.
      Also, as a side-note, I’m of the opinion that it is never too early to teach boys that you never touch someone without their permission.

    • elle

      Yes! I also think it isn’t too early to teach girls body autonomy. This is actually a pleasant surprise-I thought I was going to be ripped to shreds in the comments.

    • Sri

      I was wondering this. We teach little girls all the time that “teasing means he likes you” and that they should just go along with it, but no. Uh uh. Nope. Never going to happen in my house. The whole “they were boyfriend and girlfriend so she liked it” stuff is just way too close to rape culture jr. for my tastes if other news sources are saying it was unwelcome. I’ve known way too many kids that say that any person that they like is their boyfriend/girlfriend where the other person couldn’t stand them, and the statement makes it seem like that might be happening here. Since the mother doesn’t get that it’s not ok, something had to happen here.

      We really need to step in when kids are little and make sure that they know that they are never ever ever ever allowed to touch/kiss/hug someone without permission and that some places are inappropriate for PDA even with the permission of the other person. Maybe “sexual offender” is a harsh term here, but something had to be done and it is sexual harassment if the other person didn’t want to be kissed.

    • Katie L.

      When I see stories like this I am always suspicious about the other side. First graders kissing isn’t unusual (each year I have kids who try to kiss each other and I talk with them about it) but if there is a history with this boy’s behavior then I’m sure many conversations/meetings were had prior to the suspension.

  • Tinyfaeri

    Wow, my daughter’s in trouble someday… she’s a kissy toddler, and loves to hug other kids. What’s so wrong with a kid kissing another kid on the hand if kiss-ee doesn’t mind it? It’s not like he was making her cry…

    • Ennis Demeter

      Six year olds are very different from toddlers. I know you know this, of course, but it’s hard to imagine when you have a toddler that in 2 or 3 years she’ll have many more boundaries than she does now, but she will. A six year old kissing other kids at school, especially in class, can be really weird to other kids. And we don’t know anything about the little girl’s reaction.

    • Tinyfaeri

      You are correct, I was not there and do not know the reaction of the girl. And gosh, thanks, I never would have guessed that 6 year olds and toddlers are different. Most of the kids I’ve known who are affectionate as 6, 7, 8 year olds were affectionate their whole lives – they hug and kiss their friends and family. A lot of things are weird to kids. That doesn’t mean a kid deserves a suspension or to be labeled as a sex offender by their school district for kissing someone on the hand. Perspective, it’s a good thing.

  • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

    I remember my grade two teacher, old Miss Coulter who always wore a floor-length skirt, pecked me on the lips for giving her a Christmas present. Even as a kid in the early ’90s I knew that could get her in trouble. So I said nothing because I thought it was no big deal.
    The tattling kids? Yeah. Children do tend to love drama and make no beans about creating some. I know in grade four that I tattled on a troubled kid who was bothering me and knew there could be an explosion over it. Feel bad about it now. But when tattling is rewarded with the excitement of someone else getting in trouble, kids are going to do it.
    And if a child can have the book thrown at him for nothing, then be on the lookout for more little policekids. The school is the problem here, obviously, but sometimes what get ignored in these stories is the fact kids are essentially encouraged to rat each other out over nothing. What ever happened to “No one likes a tattler?” This isn’t “Billy touched me in my privates,” after all. Treating all occurrences with the same seriousness is BS. Kids should be taught the difference.

    • Bic

      I don’t agree with the No one likes a tattler stuff, It’s too easy to isolate people in real need. Really the school should deal with anything like that with reasonable measures, while teaching the children appropriate behaviour. Although in this case really he shouldn’t be kissing her during school time even if she doesn’t mind, especially as he’s been suspended for it once already.

  • G.E. Phillips

    Two weeks ago, I got a call at work from the social worker at Face’s school–that the classroom teachers had caught another child pulling my son’s pants down and touching his penis. While I’m not thrilled that something like that happened, my son is three and the little girl who did it (I know who it was because Face told me) is four. It is my honest belief that she was just curious about boy parts. Should we label her a sex offender? SHE’S FOUR. The school has gotten CPS involved with the little girl’s family. I’m now more concerned for the little girl and her family than I am for my son, who is absolutely fine and wasn’t bothered at all by the incident. I don’t know. This story struck a nerve with me.

    • wonderstruck

      I can see why CPS would be involved – if nothing is happening at home hopefully it ends quickly. But some kids aren’t just curious, they’re acting out what has been done to them at home, and if it that was happening and the school just brushed this incident off, it could be awful for that little girl.

    • G.E. Phillips

      Oh I totally get why CPS was called, maybe I didn’t make that clear. I guess my point is that a child who does something relatively innocuous–kissing a classmate, or even what happened to my son– they shouldn’t jump up to label that child as a sex offender. If there’s a concern about the child’s motivations, then by all means look into the situation further. But labeling a young child like that just seems unnecessary and counterproductive to me .
      Help the child if necessary, yes.
      Although my gut feeling is that it was just curiousity in the situation with my son, my immediate and lasting concern is that the little girl who did it is ok.

    • G.E. Phillips

      I had a reply here, and it disappeared. Weird. Anyway, yes, I understand why CPS got involved in the situation with my son, and the thought of something having happened to the little girl definitely crossed my mind, and that’s where my concern lies, as my son is fine. I’m just saying, slapping an extreme label like “sex offender” on a really young child does absolutely no good for anyone.

  • Jessica

    If this child had been disciplined before for interactions with this little girl, and if the school viewed it as escalating to “sexual harassment” wouldn’t an appropriate step have been to not have them sit together in class? I would think that if the parents of the girl were concerned, then this fairly simple step would have been taken. This just seems like a bizarre course of action to me. I would think talking with the parents, changing seats, maybe talking to a guidance counselor about being appropriate in school, etc. would be far more effective than suspension and “sexual harassment” labels.

    • Ennis Demeter

      But what if the school used that term because one student was aggressively kissing other students against their will, and no other term was handy?

    • Jessica

      I understand that the term fits the schools definition of his actions. I just wonder why other steps weren’t taken to keep this situation from escalating to where suspension and the label “sexual offender” was used. If he was aggressively targeting her against her will, I would hope that the school put other actions into place. And maybe they did, but we don’t know because we only hear Hunter’s mom’s side. It seems like a big jump from kissing her hand to sex offender.

    • Ennis Demeter

      This is like a game of telephone. Nobody said the term “sex offender ” except for Internet commenters. We don’t even know if the school said it was sexual-harassment. The mother of the boy said that term was used in a meeting. It could very well have been used in it contacts different than what people are assuming. For example, the principal might have said if he were older this would be sexual-harassment and that’s one reason why it’s important to teach children not to do this when they’re young.

    • Jessica

      I am sorry if I am missing something, but this article states “now the school has suspended him and included the term “sexual offender” in his school records” and the linked article says that the school district commented that his actions fit the description of sexual harassment. So I wasn’t basing my comment on Internet commenters. However, like you, I do wonder if mom has blown the meeting out of proportion and if that really is indeed on his record, or if it was as you state, part of a larger conversation that she misconstrued.

    • Katie L.

      It is possible that they weren’t supposed to sit together, but I teach first grade, and let me tell you, even putting them in separate chairs/spots doesn’t always stop kids from ending up together. I cannot count the number of times I’ve separated kids only to have them somehow end up next to each other again. It’s like they’re made of magnets or something.

    • Jessica

      I totally get that! I would just think that there would be a “paper trail” a little longer than is being shown here if it has escalated this far. And again, maybe there has been a variety of actions to diffuse this, but the school is not commenting on them.

    • Katie L.

      It is unfortunate that we only have one parent’s side, although the school would not be able to comment on the story because of confidentiality issues. Many of the commenters here are saying this boy has a history of kissing this girl. If that’s the case, my guess is that there were meetings and other interventions tired. If it was truly a “one strike and he’s out” kind of thing then it does seem a little extreme.

    • Jessica

      There’s a link to the other mom’s side up thread , in case you haven’t seen it. I just read it. It fills in a lot of gaps.
      http://www.canoncitydailyrecord.com/news/canoncity-local-news/ci_24702103/mother-girl-involved-kissing-discipline-speaks-out

    • Lackadaisical

      There may well be a big paper trail like that, or it may have happened the way the mum describes it, but the school doesn’t have the right to comment about the situation in the press the way that a parent does. The parents can put their side out there but even if there is a big paper trail and the boy was doing more than kissing or the little girl wanted it to stop the school can’t really tell the world that because schools can’t complain about specific children to journalists. Even if a kid is completely in the wrong a school can’t go around ruining the reputation of a 6 year old by telling the world about the situation, they have to keep their side of it confidential.

    • Jessica

      Oh, I know. I don’t expect the school to comment, and I know that they can’t. I just feel that there must be some major details missing, because mom’s version is very extreme. Out of school suspension is usually very hard to hand down without major cause, so either mom is really fluffing up her side of the story, or this district takes zero tolerance very seriously. I also remember way back in like, 2003, when parents didn’t go to the news with their differences with the schools. Ah, the good old days.

    • wonderstruck

      Yep, she was fluffing up the story (as many of suspected) – even newer articles today have come out saying that the school already gave the boy an in-house suspension and that this has been happening over and over despite many things they’ve tried.

    • Jessica

      That makes so much more sense.

  • Rachel Sea

    My friend’s daughter was labeled a sex offender for pantsing her friend in kindergarten. When they tried to apply to private schools, they were rejected because of the liability of enrolling a child who may be a pervert.

    Schools have lost their damn minds.

    • Ennis Demeter

      A sex offense is a legal term. I doubt that kid was accused of a crime. On the other hand, I wouldn’t want a kid who would do that to another kid in my class either. “Pantsing” is really mean.

    • Rachel Sea

      Schools districts have some bizarre leeway in labeling kids, as though legality is irrelevant if you are under 4′ tall (google “zero tolerance” and you will come up with hundreds of stories of districts turning normal kids into criminals). In her school file, she has a sheet of paper describing the incident, with a big red tab on it that says SEX OFFENSE, and it reads like a conviction. My friend took a photo when she was fighting them on it.

      And yes, pantsing is mean, but she was FIVE. They should have scolded her, given her a time out, made her apologize, and told her parents.

    • G.E. Phillips

      Agree completely

    • Ennis Demeter

      Permanent records are a myth for elementary school children. I’m sorry I just don’t believe that it’s quite how that happened.

    • Rachel Sea

      Believe what you want, but you are wrong. Schools have files on all their kids, and they share. I saw a photo of the incident report describing her as a sex offender, it’s what comes of having zero-tolerance rules.

      And it wasn’t an aggressive act, it was an underwear joke, because she was five, and thought underwear were the funniest thing on the planet.

  • pixie

    I’m pretty sure in kindergarten I was kissing all the boys because they all wanted to kiss me. I have no idea if any of us got caught or reprimanded, but that was also back in 1995/6. I do remember that one or two of the little boys started to creep me out when we got a little older, in grade 1 and 2 so I started putting some boundaries between myself and them (basically avoiding them on the playground and not partnering with them in class).

  • DeanaCal

    I really wish we had more than just the mother’s side of this story. Unfortunately, I’ve seen too many instances where a child was disciplined in a completely appropriate way by a school and the next thing you know, the parents are on the news claiming some kind of discrimination against their precious snowflake. It really just downplays the instances where a disciplinary measure really WAS inappropriate.

    • Aldonza

      Yeah, I wouldn’t mind having a bit more of the story. When I was in elementary school I was terrorized by a boy who would chase me around and called me his “girlfriend”. It got so bad I would refuse to go out at recess. The Mom of the boy would brush it off and say that I liked it and when the school took action raised a huge stink. Also, working in an education environment, all it takes is the little girl deciding she doesn’t like it and complaining to her Mom and suddenly the school is in trouble for not dealing with it.

    • http://www.ambiencechaser.com/ Elizabeth Licata

      I saw an article with info from the girl’s mother, and it paints a very different story. She says the girl is not the boy’s girlfriend and had told him to stop kissing her on multiple occasions, and the boy has been in trouble for it before. The school said it would never have suspended a 6-year-old for one silly incident, which makes sense. I find myself very weirded out by the way the boy’s mother is saying the girl is his “girlfriend” and a willing participant if that is not the case.

      http://www.canoncitydailyrecord.com/news/canoncity-local-news/ci_24702103/mother-girl-involved-kissing-discipline-speaks-out

    • elle

      Thank you. I definitely knew there was more to this story! Good to see the moms side…..

    • Aldonza

      This really changes the story. There should maybe be a bit more fact checking before posting some of these articles…

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      Really? I should magically know there would be an update hours after my original story went up? I am happy to check for updates and make them when I can, but I am not a robot who can sit on the same story 24 hours a day. I do have to sleep at some point :(

    • Tinyfaeri

      pffft, sleep. Don’t you know you run a popular blog??

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      send me cofeeeeeee

    • http://www.ambiencechaser.com/ Elizabeth Licata

      The girl’s mother didn’t say anything until hours and hours later, and it was originally only something she posted on her personal Facebook page. I only saw that link when a Facebook friend who has been following the Canon City Daily Record for some reason got in a fight about it with some other Facebook friends.

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      hahha, TY. I am all STOP MAKING ME FEEL BAD I DO MY BEST

    • pixie

      That definitely raises some questions about the boy’s mother’s perspective/attitude. I’m still not sure if I’m comfortable with using the term “sexual harassment” with a six year old, and think maybe it should be labelled as “inappropriate physical contact” because of his age (I know it’s basically a euphemism, but the little boy most likely doesn’t realize what he is doing is wrong and might not realize the little girl is uncomfortable with it if she hasn’t mentioned it to him specifically).

    • DeanaCal

      Thanks for finding that link. I had a feeling that there was much more to the story.

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      UPDATED

    • DeanaCal

      Thank you for posting the update, Eve. One of the reasons I love this site is that you guys aren’t afraid to do that when new information comes to light.

      Because so many people have commented on it, I would like to add that nowhere in the article does it say that the little boy has actually been labeled a sex offender. All it says is that the superintendant, when asked, confirmed that the behavior fit one of the definitions of the district’s sexual harassment policy. These are two different things. There is also no proof that the school even used those words. I think we all agree that this boy should not be labeled a sex offender but we don’t have any actual evidence that he was labeled anything.

  • Kay_Sue

    When I was six, my dad came to pick me up from daycare after school, and my “boyfriend” Danny walked me up to him, holding hands, and said, “Some day, I am going to marry this girl.”

    My dad said,”I’m buying a squirt gun,” and that was the end of it. Everyone laughs about it to this day, including Danny and me (who did not, alas, get married, although we are still friends).

    Kids do this shit. They’re emulating adults, and that should totally be taken into account for kids so young. It really is sickening that we have schools covering up for football players, and a six year old has this guilt for something he doesn’t even fully understand.

  • T

    It’s a tough one. Boys at that age will often do that just to annoy the other kids, amused by the reaction they get. I have had to struggle with this one with my boys. My boys (5 and 3) are very affectionate. They always hug their friends when they get to daycare or school. But I have had to have many talks with them about understanding the other kids body signals (like if they pull away or tell them no) This kid is 6, no matter what he did, doesnt deserve to be dealt with so harshly on him.His parents yes, if they aren’t properly addressing the issue, but not him.

  • Alexandra

    I’d be willing to bet the term “sex offender” was NOT told to the student. So as for him asking “what is sex, mommy?” that seems a bit strange. The simple fact is, you tell him DO NOT touch another student. Hands and mouth to yourself. Whether he is being “sweet” or not, this can me misconstrued as aggression. Maybe his behavior was more disruptive/ aggressive than “sexual” but he needs boundaries.

    • wonderstruck

      Yeah I thought that too. And the term ‘sex offender’ was actually never even used by the school. All the school said was that what he was doing fit their description of sexual harassment. Which it does. I’m not sure why everyone here seems to think that someone being in trouble for sexual harassment and someone being called a sex offender is the same thing. It’s not.

  • Edify

    My daughter would end up in juvey

  • Katie L.

    Please, if I suspended my first graders each time they kissed someone or made a gun out of something (another thing kids get suspended for) I’d have like, 15 kids in my class. First graders do this kind of stuff. This is why I spend a lot of time talking about respect and friendship with my students.

  • pineapplegrasss

    Its never to early to start teaching your son to respect women. We need to teach our sons to grow up into good men. All of these older boys we hear about date-raping and such, they have mothers, aren’t their mothers just floored??
    I will never forget this one time when I was in high school and at a friends house, she had a younger brother about 12 or 13, and her mom made him call some girl he had told that he would call her. She told him that boys don’t treat girls that way, and if he didn’t want to call her then he should never had said he would. My sons aren’t that old yet, but you can be sure that I’m working everyday to instill in them a healthy respect for women along with all the other teachings of kindness, compassion, tolerance etc. I want them to see their dad being kind and sweet to me, so they will grow up and be sweet to their own honeys. That’s kind of off topic, but the point is: we need to teach our sons what is acceptable behavior and how to treat girls appropriately.
    And, if they can suspend my first grader for roughhousing, then they can suspend hers for unwanted/ unwelcomed kisses. I’m sure he just thought about it as some other school holiday anyways. I’m sure he’s not emotionally damaged

  • Guest

    I guess a bunch of my students (kindergarteners) would be labeled as sex offenders then. I have this pair that, no matter how many times I remind them that we don’t touch anyone else’s body unless it’s for a handshake/high five, a hug, or to hold hands with your line partner.

    I think that suspending the kid is a bit much, even if it is repeated, mainly because I want to know if anyone ever sat down and had a talk with him about this behavior (not at home, since his mom seems to condone it, but at school). Did his teacher ever pull him aside and ask him why he is behaving that way? Did they sit him down and explain explicitly, with no room for misunderstanding, that he cannot do this, and that if it continues, there will be serious consequences?

  • Jack

    I think he should be put in prison, well at least he didn’t kiss another boy, Pathetic
    I was raised in the 50′s what has this country become OMG

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      LOOOOOOL. I hope this is delicious delicious sarcasm

    • DeanaCal

      Wow, I hope so too!!!

  • Me

    I’m curious what all of your responses to this story would be if the school had instead accused the boy of “physical harassment”? As the mother of a 7-year-old girl who has endured this type of harassment from one specific boy at school (kissing, hugging, lunging, tackling), I completely agree with the discipline and consequences for the child. I don’t necessarily agree with the term “sexual” harassment, but it’s definitely harassment; at what age does it become “sexual”? Is there a magical “sexually knowledgeable” age when that term would apply? If any child was doing anything to prevent my child from learning or enjoying herself at school, I would want the behavior stopped. OF COURSE they’ve tried many other courses of action before it hit the news. I’m more concerned about the fact that the boy’s mom calls them boyfriend/girlfriend at that age, but nobody is up in arms about that.

  • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ wmdkitty

    What this kid did is textbook sexual harassment. It’s not “cute”. Sure, it’s just kisses, now, but just you wait ten years, he’ll be trying to weasel his way out of a rape charge.

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  • raymond

    people are to strict to kids am in 6th almost in high school and I see the assistant principal yelling at a kindergarten kid just from his brother defended him on the school bus after a kid punched him in the face for no reason and the kid 3 days of detention the victim 6 days for not telling an adult they didn’t even scold the the attacker C.E rose k-8

  • Yogs

    Shame on school. To even consider such an attitude for kids

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