Permanent Birth Control Terrifies Me And These Essure Complaints Aren’t Helping Matters

shutterstock_132261413__1384370288_142.196.156.251I just had my second child, at forty. After spending years trying to conceive my first – and having my second come as a surprise – I can confidently say that I would like to permanently shutter my baby-making shop. The problem is – I’m sort of terrified of long-term, permanent birth control.

After two c-sections, the thought of going through another surgical procedure is just not something I can wrap my brain around. Also, at the moment I don’t have insurance, so tubal ligation is out of the question. I’ve read about Essure and it always seemed like a pretty good alternative to getting my tubes tied. It’s permanent, non-hormonal, non-surgical and recommended for women like me – who don’t want anymore children.  From Blisstree:

Dr. Carrie Panoff, an OB/GYN, explains what Essure is and how it works:

A trained physician places soft/flexible inserts into your fallopian tubes via your cervix. Over the course of three months, scar tissue develops within these inserts and your tubes are blocked permanently. The entire procedure takes just a few minutes and you can immediately return to your usual activities. Over the next three months, the body works with the inserts to form a natural barrier in the fallopian tubes to prevent sperm from reaching the egg. Three months after the Essure procedure, an Essure Confirmation Test is given to confirm that the inserts are in place and that the fallopian tubes are blocked, verifying that the patient can rely on Essure for permanent birth control.

No surgery and the lasting effects of getting your tubes tied? It all seemed so great until I read recent reports of hundreds of complaints.

From NBC News:

To date, the FDA has received about 900 adverse event reports involving Essure, which is less than 1 percent of the total procedures performed.

But women who have had complications said it is not just the number of problems they’re concerned with. It’s the severity.

The complaints range from abdominal pain and swelling to forced hysterectomies to get the coils out.

Okay, that scares me. I realize less than one percent means pretty good odds that you will not have an adverse reaction, but some of the complaints just sound so horrific: “Some women described ‘bleeding every day’ and developing a ‘spiderweb’ of scar tissue. Another said, ‘I felt my insides were on fire.’”

The idea of inserting something into my body and keeping it there makes me uncomfortable. I’m probably just a wimp, though. I have the same feelings about laser surgery to correct my vision. For some reason I always think I’m going to be the cautionary tale.

Some doctors are wondering if Essure was studied long enough before it was put on the market. An allergy to nickel may be responsible for some of these adverse reactions, but patients are not tested for the allergy – they are merely asked whether or not they are allergic.

Dr. Diana Zuckerman has worked as a congressional investigator and currently runs a nonprofit FDA watchdog group. She believes more should have been done.

“You’re looking at those side effects for those few years,” Zuckerman said. “But you don’t know what’s going to happen to her five or 10 or 15 or 20 years down the road.”

(photo: FooTToo/ Shutterstock)

You can reach this post's author, Maria Guido, on twitter.
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    • meteor_echo

      What scares me much, much more than a forced hysterectomy is having a child, or pregnancy. I’d honestly rather take Essure (yes, with my nickel allergy and all) than have non-permanent birth control fail on me. The fact that I have zero control over my own fertility even if I use pills, condoms and what else at the same time is absolutely, gut-chillingly terrifying to me.

      Though, admittedly, I’d rather have a good old snip and cauterization. No thought is more soothing than “finally, those blasted fallopian tubes have been killed with fire”.

      • Andrea

        I hate to say it like this, because it hurts women dealing with infertility, but I kinda sucks being a fertile Myrtle. I swear I share soap with a man and I end up pregnant.
        My husband and I talked about it and decided that permanent was the way to go. I was only 27 years old when I had my 2nd baby and I was DONE and I was looking at at least 20 more years of fertility. Hell no. He got the big V and we couldn’t be happier!

      • meteor_echo

        I don’t understand the “any mention of being fertile is a problem” mentality. It’s exactly the same when someone writes an article about having an abortion, and then a sea of bitches™ flows into the comments and starts screaming bloody murder (pun not intended) at the author for this very reason. What’s a blessing for one person can be a lifetime curse for somebody else.

      • AugustW

        I’ll admit I had some moments of guilty feelings when I was pregnant, accidentally, and I had more than one friend who was struggling with fertility issues.

      • Bethany Ramos

        Yay vasectomy before the age of 30! Us too :)

      • Ann B.

        DH is looking at getting his this winter, and he’ll be 27 at the time. That being said, baby #2 was born a repeat c-section. I was on medicaid, and in our state, they cover birth control of any kind immediately after birth. That includes tubals. I swear my OB would not stop bringing up getting my tubes tied. Every single time we talked about it, she asked if we were doing a tubal while we were in there. I was 23 when baby #2 was born. It was really kind of off-putting, like, okay, I realize I’ll have 2 under 2, but we’re married, he’s gainfully employed, we planned it this way, and frankly I’m not ready to close that door yet. I was really confused.

      • Bethany Ramos

        Wow, pushy! We also have 2 under 2 and finished up when we were both almost 30. My husband thought the doc might give him trouble about his age with the vasectomy, but they never said a peep! The only reason tubal was off the table was because I had a home birth so no hospital, AND vasectomies are way cheaper.

      • Meg

        They are probably pushy because of limitations on Medicaid. In my state, you have to ask six weeks in advance for Medicaid to cover a tubal…which neither I nor my ob-gyn knew about. Medicaid for pregnant women in my state lasts until six weeks postpartum. I inquired about it when I two days before I gave birth. My ob-gyn tried so hard, but since it was a non-emergency surgery, I could not get it scheduled in time.

      • nicole

        My husband also had a vasectomy before age 30. He didn’t get any grief about his age and our insurance paid 100% of the cost. He scheduled his for the day a highly anticipated video game was coming out and spent a weekend alone in the basement recovering while he played his game and the kids and i brought him food. He says he wishes he could get a vasectomy once a year.

      • Toaster

        Having had non-permanent birth control fail me in the past I am eager to go the fire route myself.

      • meteor_echo

        I hope you’ll find a non-condescending surgeon who will agree to let you go the fire route :D

      • Toaster

        Thanks! My husband is younger than me and hadn’t had any trouble scheduling a vasectomy (we’re not taking ANY chances) so I’m hoping I’ll be able to get it done no probs.

      • keelhaulrose

        My girls were both pill and condom babies. Before my second c-sect I talked to my doctor about getting the tubes tied when he was in there. His exact words were “you’re only twenty-eight, are you sure you’re ready to make such a permanent decision. Why don’t I give you a pill prescription? Or Merina?” Nope, no more chances for the non permanent method. I can’t afford to pay for it to fail again!

      • meteor_echo

        Asdfdfkjh now I think I’m going to be even more paranoid about birth control.
        Also, that doctor was a condescending, smug, pro-natalist genital wart on the ass of medicine. I hate the “you’ll 100% change your mind” mentality with the passion of a thousand suns. Or with a passion of Mu Cephei. That’s one big damn star.

      • keelhaulrose

        I’m pretty sure there was some racism there, too. It was the closest (the next with openings was 20 miles away) OBGYN that took Medicaid, which I had to go on after my husband lost his job just before I found out I was pregnant. A few of my co-workers, mostly African immigrants, went to him, and they said he pushed tubal ligation on them after their first, even though they were younger than me. I’m not sad I never have to see him again.

      • meteor_echo

        What the sweet silky precious fuck. UGH.

      • AugustW

        I am like 95% sure that I’m done having kids, but I’m not going to do anything permanent about it. Don’t really need to at the moment…forced celibacy through a busy school/work/parenting schedule is pretty effective, lol.

      • NotTakenNotAvailable

        Seriously. Fuck the smug, “Oh, you’ll change your mind.” No. I’m 27. I’ve been dead-set against having children for the last 20 years. I’m not going to change my mind in the next 20.

        Although the nickel allergy makes me much more open to the “nuke the tubes from orbit” method than Essure. Part of the point of permanent pregnancy prevention in my book is avoiding unneccessary pain, cramping, bloating, and agony!

      • Alicia Kiner

        Same thing, except I have a boy and a girl… mine are 16 months apart, and I was 24. As soon as I found out I was having a girl the second time around, I was asking for a tubal ligation. EVERY visit. They made me wait 24 hours after she was born to have the surgery, just to see if I changed my mind. I didn’t. Oh, and my husband had to sign a consent form. All the doctors were trying to convince him to have the procedure because we were so young and they can be reversed, and most insurances pay for the reversals. I was like nope, I’m good. I hate being pregnant, have spent most of the last 2 1/2 years completely miserable, and we have a boy and a girl. We’re good. Thanks. If we ever decide we want more, we’ll look into fostering. There are tons of kids who need good parents, even for short periods of time. At least then, we’ll be making a difference in the world.

      • Tinyfaeri

        I’d go with cut and cauterize, myself, but I like to be as relatively sure as can be, and something about actually severing something seems more comfortably final than just plugging it up. Fallopian tubes are tricky, tricky bastards.

        I do think that there should be more permanent birth control options for women, preferably some that don’t involve invasive surgery or the potential to need for invasive surgery. If you don’t want kids, you shouldn’t have to be at risk to have them.

      • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

        I actually had problems finding a doctor willing to tie my tubes at my age (I’m almost 30 now, but this was a couple of years ago). I would probably have an easier time now, but my husband has decided to get the old snip snip himself. It’s easier on him physically, and less of a pain in the arse all around.

      • meteor_echo

        Ugh. The “You’ll change your mind”crowd is so infuriating.
        I suppose I’m just overall a very pragmatic person. While it might not be the case, there’s still a small chance that I’ll break up with my current man-friend, and so I’d rather leave the issue of my own fertility in my little grabby paws. The idea of not getting pregnant EVER is as soothing to me as a menthol lozenge to a sore throat.

      • GPMeg

        A friend of mine is quite certain she doesn’t want children, never has and I thoroughly believe never will. She makes the point that even if she changed her mind, there are plenty of children needing adoption. She started trying six years ago at 26 to get her tubes tied and insurance wouldn’t cover it! I mean gaaaaahhhhhh, if it’s our choice to regret it then let us regret it! I guarantee most of us wouldn’t!

      • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

        That sounds SO frustrating. See, I have three kids, which is always the number that I’ve wanted. I had mine pretty early (also something I planned, it worked for us and we’re happy with it, which seems to be something some docs don’t understand) so we started asking about a tubal ligation when I was in my mid 20s. I get the same shit. “What if you change your mind?” WTF, I have three, that’s always been the plan, end of story. I’ve also gotten “What is one dies?” It makes me want to slam my head against the wall. I can’t imagine how much more shit childfree women get.

      • GPMeg

        What, you don’t want more than three children? I have a friend with five and she says you don’t really notice the extras ;)

        The entire thing is just ridiculous– I’m hoping after our hopefully maybe one (which we probably can’t afford, so yay for not having the two that we have always wanted and maybe not even the one) I can whip out that schizophrenia excuse and get them to fix it up for me without anymore arguments.

      • AugustW

        A friend of mine discovered that if she mentioned a family history of schizophrenia and/or Huntington’s makes the doctor more likely to tie ‘em up.

      • GPMeg

        Oooooh, finally! A silver lining to the stigma around mental illness! (And I’m not being facetious, that actually is something I will tuck away because why not? I actually do have schizophrenia in my family…)

      • AugustW

        A friend of mine was in the same boat as you. It took her some time to find a doctor that would do it to a 27 year old, but she found one and she has been blissfully happy ever since.

      • NotTakenNotAvailable

        Who was that doctor? I will cross state lines to find someone who will fix me without giving me crap!

    • Andrea

      Oh honey, it’s time for “someone” else to take the BC burden. If you guys are truly truly truly sure you don’t want more children, then the vasectomy IS the way to go! And before I hear objections, listen to this:
      1. This is an OUTPATIENT procedure. I took my husband and I kid you not he was gone 45 mins from the time he walk through the door, to the time he came out to check-out. It is THAT quick!
      2. We had some insurance, but it wasn’t the best insurance ever. Even with that, it is not actually an outrageously expensive procedure. Talk to an urologist, maybe even get some recommendations from PP.

      3. YOU went through TWO major surgeries. You were pregnant. Twice. You breastfed for months on end. Twice. Your body went through huge changes. TWICE. The least he can do is endure a little discomfort for a few hours.
      4. Recovery time is actually pretty minimal. Lots of doctors perform them of Fridays, so the patients can recover over the weekend. Be prepared to baby him for the weekend, but I promise you he’ll be fine by Monday.
      5. Remember, there is a 6 week period where he still would be fertile, so still use BC until he goes back for his check-up and they tell him he is clear.

      • Renee J

        I talked with my husband about a vasectomy and he admitted that if something happened to me, he might want children with another woman. So, I told him I’d want a child with another man if he died. And that’s why I’m still on the pill.

      • Andrea

        Well I can respect that, but when he and I talked about it, we both knew we would never want more children either with each other or with other people.
        It actually DID give me pause because (and I am gonna be a little sexist here), I thought he would have a hard time finding a partner if he couldn’t have more kids (more than I would, I think). It’s possible it’s just my misconception though.

        In any event, we were both very sure. And now I am almost 40 and he is almost 50, so it would probably be too late either way!

      • AE Vorro

        From what I hear from my single, childfree cohort, both men and women have a hard time finding people who will date them knowing that kids are not a option. Happily(?) pronatalism seems to cut both ways.

      • Andrea

        That surprises me a little. But I bet you anything that’s changing. Or at least it is more acceptable (as it should be!) for people to admit they don’t want kids

      • AE Vorro

        Here’s hoping! :)

      • NotTakenNotAvailable

        Yep. One of the main reasons I don’t date anymore is that most of the guys I’ve met either make it clear up front that they do want children, or they don’t say anything but do offer a subtle smirk when I mention my commitment to childfreedom indicating that they just KNOW my feeble womanly brain is incapable of that much foresight and with enough time and patience, they’ll get me to realize that my womb is perfect for their man-seed! Then five years later, I’ll get yelled at for “stringing [them] along” by “making [them] think we were going to get married and start a family” when I was just “USING” them for…some nefarious purposes the whole time. Pass, thanks.

      • meteor_echo

        What the fuck. Ugh.
        I found my man-friend (who is 35 and childfree as well) on DeviantArt. I suppose it’s a coincidence – then again, I know there are childfree dating sites, so there’s that.

      • AE Vorro

        Aaaaruggghhh! (That is the most civil, cogent reply I can muster to the nonsense you’ve endured. Ugh.)

      • NotTakenNotAvailable

        It’s only happened a couple times, but that was a couple too many. -_- There are many other reasons I don’t date anymore, but back when I was on the fence about setting up an online profile just to test the waters, those memories popped into my mind and made me yell “NOPE” from the rooftops.

        Edited to add: The “couple times” does not include the whole being yelled at five years down the line. I’ve only been in one relationship that lasted that long, and he was similarly childfree. It’s just that I could see my future very clearly in the condescenscion with which the dudes who were not of a similar mindset spoke to me about my dedication to childfreedom.

      • Kelly

        I’d move out if my husband said that to me.

        Oh, so he thinks he might want some more children, just not with me… OK babe, knock yourself out with that.

      • Renee J

        I didn’t find it insulting. We already have three kids. But, if either of us dated again, we might want another with a new spouse. (Plus, he keeps dropping hints that he wants a fourth with me, but that’s not happening.)

      • C.J.

        My husband had a vasectomy, he says it’s the best thing he ever did. After my stroke my neurologist suggested to him that it would be a good idea. I couldn’t take hormone bc any more and surgery was too much of a risk for me. We were super paranoid until he went, so glad it is done now.

      • AE Vorro

        Yes! I have a friend who has three kids and was reluctant to ask her husband to get snipped. When she and I discussed it, I mentioned the whole baby factor. My husband got snipped voluntarily – we had no kids, so I was very grateful that he stepped up to the plate because I felt that since it was his body, I had no right to request he undergo the procedure. But if we had had any kids together, I would have been very comfortable saying “your turn, honey.” Happily, she took that to heart; they are done procreating and it wasn’t a big deal for her husband.

      • Andrea

        I guess things would have been different if we had no children. I probably would have done it myself. But after going through the whole process of having a baby twice (and all that entails to your body), I didn’t have qualms about telling him it was “his turn”. And really, it is not even comparable anyways. The procedure is over in less than 1 hr and recovery time is 2 days, three at most. Pales in comparison.

      • AE Vorro

        Exactly!!!! If you’ve put your body through childbirth, you can certainly ask your spouse to do his part!

      • Natasha

        THIS. THIS is why hubby is 87.345% talked into it.

      • Andrea

        I got more reasons! I was *this* close to putting together a power point presentation on it when it came to convincing him. But it was the right thing for him to do. I wasn’t fair that the burden would be on me for forever. And honestly, I personally think pretty much all forms of BC currently available suck. I don’t like hormones (they make me bitchy) and that eliminates at least half. I am allergic to spermicide (so there goes pretty much the other half). So what’s left is crappy things that interrupt the sexual flow like diaphragm and gels and caca like that. Ugh.

      • AE Vorro

        I would reaaaally like to see such a PowerPoint.

    • StealthGent

      I considered it for a long while, but heard that it can have major issues if you have metal sensitivities. Even though I haven’t had issues in years, I didn’t think it worth the risk. They also weren’t sure what effect my uterus atrophying in the future would have on it (a side effect of testosterone use)

      However, I still recommend this to anyone who knows the risks. I think it’s a great product and can save thousands of dollars in cost and time off work as opposed to getting your tubes tied. The risks are low, really low, and every procedure has its horror stories.

      We opted for getting my partner a vasectomy, which also has its risks, but looks like it will play out best for us. I know that permanent BC will solve a lot of our current sexual problems.

      • Emmali Lucia

        With testosterone use isn’t the safest thing to just get a hysterectomy? I was told that with testosterone use your risk of cervical, ovarian, and breast cancer sky rocket if you don’t just get it all removed. But I could be wrong.

    • brebay

      I don’t think I’d do this, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be an option for women who genuinely don’t ever want kids. This notion that we have to “protect” women from themselves is insulting. If it scares you, don’t do it. I probably wouldn’t. But many people don’t want kids, never will, and they have every right to have something like this.

      • AP

        I don’t think the issue is “protecting” women from themselves, it’s protecting them from a medical device that is not working as designed, which is resulting in harm. No one’s questioning its function as a method of birth control, they are questioning its safety as a bodily implant, and it’s the FDA’s job to make sure implants are reasonably safe.

      • brebay

        If you read a lot of the comments on here, it’s amazing how many doctors still refuse to give women permanent birth control because they can’t believe they really don’t ever want children. That’s the point I was responding too. I get that this is one definitely has more risks than the others, but many of the women commenting here couldn’t even get a tubal ligation. I actually know a few women who have Essure, two don’t mind it, one thought it was an absolute nightmare. My point is that it’s 2013, and doctors need to quit with the “Oh, honey, you’re too young to know what you want.”

    • LadyClodia

      I’d never heard of Essure before, but I wouldn’t be a candidate for it anyway because I have a nickel allergy. I had tried Mirena hoping that it would be a more convenient method of birth control, but I had some pretty unpleasant/possibly dangerous reactions while I had it. I had it removed and my husband had a vasectomy. I was kind of tired of putting my body through stuff for birth control, and he figured that it was easier for him (and covered under his insurance,) so we’re good now.

    • prEssured*into*a*mistake

      I cannot even read the article before I have to post this DO NOT GET THIS CRAP ! I’ve had it done. It requires EXPENSIVE PAINFUL AND INVASIVE follow up care (hsg is $1400 in my city), and in my case one of the wires has worked its way through my intestines causing me severe cramping with any exercise, sex or bowel movement. I now need surgery anyway to remove the thing, and that was the whole point of Essure instead of a tubal. Checkout all the HORROR stories of getting pregnant after Essure, of being allergic to the metals, increase risk of ectopic pregnancy, and of course in my case perforations. DONT DO IT!!!!!! Women need Essure like they need a hole in the head!

    • pineapplegrasss

      I’ve already signed on the dotted line: tie these tubes when the next baby’s out. I thought about this Essure but it sure does sound scary with all the side effects. I do think that if you’re in a married monogamous relationship then its safer and cheaper for the man to get a vasectomy tho.
      oh, and I did LASIK, but they only burn your retina with a laser lol

    • prEssured*into*a*mistake

      By the way, the “Essure Confirmation Test” is an HSG (hysterosalpingogram) You are naked with a speculum in you. a catheter full of dye is filled inside and expands your uterus FAST (pressure similar to pregnancy) you are on an xray table under the xray and must contort this way and that with the speculum the entire time, while they try and decide if you are in fact, blocked. By the way the procedure will extend your postpartum bleeding even longer if you have it done at 6-8weeks because it opens your cervix. The HSG really is worse than having the inserts placed. And of course when i saw the coil about 5 inches from my fallopian tube and in my intestines right there on the xray and the radiologist and assistants gasped, I knew I was screwed. Since the HSG is a “follow up” the actual procedure gets hailed as this amazing painless in office procedure, and the rest of it you find out afterwards when you are scheduling the HSG (mine was done at a hospital, required blood pregnancy test and cost $1400) AT BEST tthis procedure is not being done with accurate disclosure!

      • Rachel Sea

        HSGs are varying levels of uncomfortable for everyone. Some people say they feel nothing; I found the dye to be painless, but the catheter balloon was one of the most excruciating things I’ve ever experienced, so much so that I nearly cried from relief when they deflated it.

      • Tinyfaeri

        From what I read, you have a 50/50 shot at it being painless or like menstrual cramps, or horribly painful. I was unfortunately in the latter camp, and sparing the internet details, it took nearly 40 minutes. I’d almost rather give birth again rather than have another one.

    • Blahblah

      We cannot convince any doctor to give us permanent birth control. We didn’t really think we ever wanted one kid, and we’re certain we don’t want more after this one. But every time I bring it up I get told “Well, you’ll change your mind!”

      Uh… So you’ve got a crystal ball? Neat. Gimme some lottery numbers or something. Mr.Blahblah got told “But what if you and your partner break up?” Suddenly a different woman will make him want to procreate? Thanks for making me feel awful.

      • Andrea

        How young are you? It seems awfully unethical for a doctor to refuse to perform a procedure!

        My husband’s urologist strongly urged the spouse to attend the information visit. He wanted to make sure we BOTH understood just how permanent the whole thing is and I didn’t have to sign anything, but he did.

      • Blahblah

        24 (me) and 22 (him), so yes, I will say we are REALLY young. Then again, there are thirty five year olds in my town that docs won’t touch because they’ll “change their minds!” It could just be that the docs in my town are old fashioned?

      • Andrea

        That’s not fair at all. They make you sign all kinds of waivers anyways. It’s YOUR life, YOUR body, YOUR decision.
        Is your partner having the same issues? Has he tried scheduling a vasectomy.

      • Blahblah

        His doctor wouldn’t even consider it. Told him he’s too young. When we told him we know we’re done, we just get told we’ll change our minds. It’s a little off putting.

      • Emmali Lucia

        I think the worst thing was if you guys were poor or of colour they’d be like “You want to be sterilized? We have an appointment next week!”

        If you don’t believe me then read the comments below talking about this very same issue, it’s disgusting.

      • Blahblah

        We’re poor, I guess just not poor enough!

      • Kelly

        We brought our toddler into the appointment with us and let him terrorize the doctor’s office.

        Two days later my husband had a vasectomy at the age of 23.

      • Blahblah

        That is genius.

    • Natasha

      SOOO glad you posted this! We’re pregnant with our LAST VERY LAST FOREVER OMG SAVE ME baby and hubs & I are discussing options. Vasectomy is def top of the list. I had talked to my dr about Essure sometime in the future, she honestly didn’t seem that excited about it. I also had a hideous reaction to the Merena and had it removed 6 weeks after insertion, roughly 4 months postpartum (hence baby on the way, again, haha). I threw up daily, was dizzy, was a raging angry ball of crazy f*ck-and 2 days after that b*tch (the mirena) was out I was HAPPY, and normal, and not puking. So having something else inserted and scar tissue forming-scares me. A lot. What’s this cauterizing option I’m hearing????? Also, 900 women is A LOT. scary.

      • Alicia Kiner

        When they do a tubal ligation it’s a laporascopic (sp?) procedure where they snip your tubes and cauterize them, sealing off each side so eggs can’t pass through. It all but eliminates the “I had a tubal ligation and 3 years later I’m pregnant.” Years ago, they would just tie them off (hence tubes tied) or just snipped and they could come untied or scar tissue could grow to basically rebuild tubes, so women would get pregnant again later. My grandma was a L&D nurse ;)

      • Natasha

        Thank you! My next OB appt I had her set aside some extra time so we could discuss options in more depth. You just hear so many scary things :/

      • Alicia Kiner

        This is a fantastic idea. She’s your best source of info. She’s going to tell you what she thinks YOUR best options are between the two of you and your significant other.

    • http://fairlyoddmedia.com/ Frances Locke

      I’m glad I’m not the only one who is a little taken aback by the thought of permanent birth control. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve been considering getting my tubes tied for a while now, but it IS a daunting prospect.

    • iamtheshoshie

      It’s not permanent, but I adored my copper IUD before I (intentionally) got pregnant. You basically don’t have to think about it, you can have it in (I think) up to 15 years, and it has the same effectiveness rate as tubal ligation. Which is good, because I’m totally a fertile Myrtle and got pregnant something like five days after getting it removed.

    • jane murphy

      Copper IUD. Loved it. Never thought about it. No problems. No baby. As close to permanent as you can get without going permanent. Honestly, you could probably have the same one in until you hit menopause.

    • Reagan Murphy

      I can’t believe that this was written today because I went to my gyno to discuss BC options this morning. I want permanence. I do not, nor does my husband, want more babies. My doctor mentioned the laparoscopic tubal ligation and Essure. At first, reading the pamphlet about Essure made me super excited. Boy, they really know how to sell this thing. Plus, since it is done in the doctor’s office, it would only cost me the copay of $40.00. But, things that seem too good to be true, probably are. When I came home, I conducted research on Essure and was horrified and scared. Even Erin Brockovich has started a petition to get it off the market and there is a Facebook page over 2,000 people strong. As I was researching, I tried to keep a level head, but the complaints kept getting worse and worse. Further, after learning that the coils are made of nickel, I knew for sure it was a no go. I have a high sensitivity to nickel. So, needless to say, I am choosing the laparoscopic option AND my husband is getting a vasectomy (remember, no more babies, no matter how cute the pics are on Mommyish!). I might have to pay more, but I definitely feel more at ease choosing the laparoscopic tubal ligation (I understand that all surgeries have risks).

    • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

      My preferred method of permanent BC is my husband getting a vasectomy. Gynecologically speaking, I feel a little procedured out.

    • DeanaCal

      I’m on my second copper iud, best decision ever. No hormones, lasts for 10 years. I’ll be 55 when the 10 years is up on this one. I looked into the Essure but even with insurance it would have been over a couple thousand bucks. My iud cost about $400 .

    • sup

      You don’t want to know the horror show that Merina has been for me.

    • Alexandra

      My hubby will be the one to do the “permanent” birth control…it’s a simpler, safer procedure for men.

    • SusannahJoy

      I used to work in surgery and did a lot of procedures with Essure. My advice to you-ask how many your doctor has done. Every single time something weird happened it was with a doctor who’s only done a few of them, and they really do have to be places correctly. And this advice actually applies to just about every surgery or medical procedure. I know how important it is for people to try doing things in order to learn them, but personally, I want someone who already knows what they’re doing.

    • Shortys Girl

      I have essure and am looking into getting a hysterectomy. I have pain constantly, missed periods, terrible cramps, dizziness, nausea, and that’s just naming a few. if you know anyone thinking about getting this bc please make sure they do their research. There is also a group on facebook named essure problems, look into that.

    • Kelly Anne Conley

      It blows my mind that they actually used nickel in the Essure devices, the most common metal to cause allergic reactions.