Mom Races Outside To Fire Shots At Sex Offender Peeper Instead Of Calling The Cops

shutterstock_143064706__1383506835_142.196.156.251Betsy Cornele, a Florida mother of three, fired shots at a sex offender who was spotted peeping into her windows by a neighbor. What happened to calling the police? Florida’s Stand Your Ground law even freaks me out when it protects innocent victims.

Cornele raced outside sometime before 11:30 p.m. Oct. 20 after her neighbor, Pedro Camacho, screamed about a man in her back yard.

Camacho told police he saw a man on his neighbor’s covered porch looking through windows, an arrest report said. Cornele ran outside to see Harris running from her back yard.

She fired her gun, prompting the man to climb over a chain-link fence into the back yard of a vacant home. He fled on a bicycle on nearby Center Street.

Cornele isn’t scared to use her gun again if necessary, telling a television news station, “We’ll take matters into our own hands if we have to protect our kids.”

She and her children were safely inside the house. Why not call the cops? She brought her gun outside and fired warning shots into the ground to scare him away. Accidents happen all the time. Is it really a great idea to be firing shots that don’t need to be fired? At night? In the dark? Jesus, this state scares the shit out of me.

I think weapons give people a false sense of security. Why opt to run outside with a gun instead of calling police? It’s like watching a horror movie; What are you doing? Don’t go out there! Don’t … oh. She’s going out there. What if he also had a gun? Is it a better idea to run out of your house, away from your children and into harm’s way?

Of course I stand behind a mother’s right to protect her kids – but the whole situation is frightening. You’re a person, holding a dangerous weapon – one that could potentially harm others besides your intended target. I understand using one if there are no other options – but to run out of your house and shoot into the night? I don’t understand.

I am really glad her neighbor spotted the man and her and her kids are okay. The man, Bobby James Harris, is a repeat offender; “He was convicted of a lewd and lascivious act on a child younger than 16 in 1996, indecent exposure in 1995 and two charges of lewd and lascivious act on a child in 1991.” I’m not saying he doesn’t deserve to be shot – I’m just saying we have law enforcement in place for a reason.

(photo: TrotzOlga/ Shutterstock)

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    • Personal

      I totally agree. I think I’d be scared to walk the streets of Florida now for fear of being hit by random shots fired by someone standing their ground a little too near me. If you aren’t in immediate danger, always call for help first thing.
      Not to be picky but there’s a mistake. ‘Her and her children’ should be ‘She and her children’—

    • Personal

      I totally agree. I think I’d be scared to walk the streets of Florida now for fear of being hit by random shots fired by someone standing their ground a little too near me. If you aren’t in immediate danger, always call for help first thing.
      Not to be picky but there’s a mistake. ‘Her and her children’ should be ‘She and her children’—

      • http://twitter.com/mariaguido Maria Guido

        Thanks! When I first moved here I saw a news story about someone who stopped a carjacker by pulling his gun, which was awesome and all – but it just reminded me that everyone is armed here.

    • Katia

      Yeah I’d be scared in florida too. But situations like this are actually the reason she has the gun. Glad the guy was caught!!!:)

    • Katia

      Yeah I’d be scared in florida too. But situations like this are actually the reason she has the gun. Glad the guy was caught!!!:)

    • blh

      Well calling the cops clearly doesn’t help. He’s been in trouble 3 times and is still free. Although I agree its very risky to be shooting at things in the dark. I wish she had shot him.

      • Blueathena623

        So, shooting at him so he runs away helps how? He would be in trouble and still be free.

      • blh

        Shoot him and kill him so he couldn’t hurt anymore children. But only shoot if she could clearly see him not just wildly in the dark.

      • Blueathena623

        The lady didn’t know he was a sex offender at the time. I can’t get behind killing random people looking in windows.

      • NYBondLady

        100x yes.

      • NYBondLady

        100x yes.

    • Annona

      Why fire a gun instead of call the cops? Well, as someone who lives in a high crime area where the cops are basically the punchline of a bad joke, I can give you my perspective. Because they won’t catch the criminal. And if they do, he’ll be out on the street again within 24 hours in many cases. By the time they take their obligatory 45 minutes to show up on the scene (I’ve seen it take as long as two hours) the criminal will be long gone. They’ll take a report, take a description, MAYBE get around to catching him, but if they catch him or if they don’t chances are pretty good that he’ll be right back in your neighborhood, doing exactly what he was doing in such a short time that it makes you sick. I’ve seen it happen. I’ve seen enough shit happen in the ten years that my husband and I have lived in this part of our state to completely disillusion me about law enforcement and what they can and can’t do to help you when you are in trouble. A known sex offender, peeking in my window, especially if I have kids? Damn straight my assumption is that he’s about to break in and rape us all, and damn straight I will shoot him dead. If more women shot more rapists, rape as a crime would start to decline. Obviously, since this guy continues to offend over and over again, the slaps on the wrist that I’m sure he’s gotten from past offenses aren’t getting through to him. So put him out of his misery like a rabid fucking dog, instead of sending him off for free hot food and cable for another ineffective few months so he can be all rested up and ready to rape some other child when he’s released again.

      She could have maybe used better judgement in firing in the neighborhood. And I would hope that anyone with a firearm in their home has the appropriate training and goes to the range frequently to practice. I am confident of my ability to use my weapon safely and accurately, because I have taken the time to hone that skill. If you aren’t confident of your abilities and you haven’t practiced regularly with your gun, you have no business having one. But taking the steps to learn that skill might mean the difference between your life and your death. I hate that I have to live in a world where you should be armed for your own protection, but that is unfortunately the reality where I live anyway.

    • Annona

      Why fire a gun instead of call the cops? Well, as someone who lives in a high crime area where the cops are basically the punchline of a bad joke, I can give you my perspective. Because they won’t catch the criminal. And if they do, he’ll be out on the street again within 24 hours in many cases. By the time they take their obligatory 45 minutes to show up on the scene (I’ve seen it take as long as two hours) the criminal will be long gone. They’ll take a report, take a description, MAYBE get around to catching him, but if they catch him or if they don’t chances are pretty good that he’ll be right back in your neighborhood, doing exactly what he was doing in such a short time that it makes you sick. I’ve seen it happen. I’ve seen enough shit happen in the ten years that my husband and I have lived in this part of our state to completely disillusion me about law enforcement and what they can and can’t do to help you when you are in trouble. A known sex offender, peeking in my window, especially if I have kids? Damn straight my assumption is that he’s about to break in and rape us all, and damn straight I will shoot him dead. If more women shot more rapists, rape as a crime would start to decline. Obviously, since this guy continues to offend over and over again, the slaps on the wrist that I’m sure he’s gotten from past offenses aren’t getting through to him. So put him out of his misery like a rabid fucking dog, instead of sending him off for free hot food and cable for another ineffective few months so he can be all rested up and ready to rape some other child when he’s released again.

      She could have maybe used better judgement in firing in the neighborhood. And I would hope that anyone with a firearm in their home has the appropriate training and goes to the range frequently to practice. I am confident of my ability to use my weapon safely and accurately, because I have taken the time to hone that skill. If you aren’t confident of your abilities and you haven’t practiced regularly with your gun, you have no business having one. But taking the steps to learn that skill might mean the difference between your life and your death. I hate that I have to live in a world where you should be armed for your own protection, but that is unfortunately the reality where I live anyway.

      • Edify

        So how do you know in that split second that the person is a “known sex offender”? I’m not excusing his actions in any way but saying that you should put him down is a rush straight to executioner based on an assumption. Further, if your mindset is that you are ready to shoot first, ask questions later, you are exposing yourself and others to more risk. What happens if your teenage kid comes home one day, forgot their keys, didn’t want to wake you and so looks for a way into the house?
        I get what you are saying about police not being efficient and that punishments are too light, particularly for crimes like this where people are likely to reoffend but surely the answer to this should be to demand more action from government on more strength in law and order as well as more activity in early intervention and finding ways to release people from the poverty that forces many into a culture of crime. Armed citizens just sounds so risky, particularly if as you mention, they have the gun but have not invested in the skill and training to use it.

      • Annona

        The article addressed him as a known sex offender, so I assumed (possibly incorrectly) that the mother had checked the database and recognized him. But honestly, anyone who is poking around my windows after dark isn’t there to sell me Girl Scout cookies. I certainly don’t assume that someone should be so trigger happy as to shoot someone in their own family…though growing up with a father who taught us how to shoot, I would hope that anyone with a firearm in the home would stress to their “teenage kid” not to climb in the windows after dark. And yeah, the government and law enforcement need to get off their collective asses and do something more about crime, in a bad way, and all those social conditions need to be addressed as well. On a macro level, it needs to happen and it certainly sounds good when people talk about it on the internet. But on a micro level, those things don’t do anything for the 12 year old girl in my town who was beaten to death a few years ago because a couple of those poor downtrodden souls who were forced into a culture of crime broke into her house while she was home sick with mono. They don’t help the old lady down the street who was brutally beaten during a home invasion, or the dude two nights ago who got shot in the face on his own back porch for 12 dollars. They don’t allow the police to actually do something about the crack house two streets over that they and everyone else know about but can’t shut down because the loopholes for criminals with ready access to cash are so egregious that the cops basically have their hands tied. There needs to be widespread reform within the entire justice system. And maybe, within the next 10 years, if we’re lucky, that will happen and things will get better. But right now, in the immediate reality of many people, the justice system is a joke, the cops are a joke, and criminals act however they want because they fear no consequence. The real possibility of being shot is a consequence. And the fact that many criminals have to fear it (because they don’t know who is armed and who is not) undoubtedly prevents things being much worse than they are in many places. I know for a fact that the ability to legally carry a firearm, and just the reality of me having it, without even using it, saved my own life on one occasion. If that person had decided to come on and attack me anyway, I’m thankful that I could have shot him, even though I was in a parking lot and not my own home, and been protected from criminal charges or litigation by his disgruntled family (which is at the root of most Stand Your Ground legislation).

        Give me a world without all those other factors, and I will gladly hand over my gun and be glad about it. But until then, sorry, as much as it sucks and I think diminishes us as humans, I have it, my right to have it is protected, and I refuse to apologize for thinking that every woman and girl in the country should be issued a firearm and taught how to use it.

      • Edify

        It seems unlikely to be that someone who perceives themselves under threat is going to take a look at the guy, run in to scroll through a database and then go for their gun.

        Personally, I couldn’t justify arming myself against the very real statistical likelihood that guns in the home increase the chances of an accidental shooting exponentially. Forgive me for not having the time to look up the figures right now. For every one of those stories above, there is one for someone how was injured or killed by a family member in their own home by accident.

        I’m thankful to live in a country where gun laws are tight and the decision to mitigate the risks of gun ownership for protection aren’t necessary. It is entirely possible to have a world where it’s not required.

      • Edify

        Have a look at all 3 parts of this series from the Daily Show to see how our conservative government reacted to a mass shooting in 1996.

        http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9pOiOhxujsE&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D9pOiOhxujsE

      • Rachel Sea

        I can think of two times in the last 6 months that I have peered into a stranger’s window, completely innocently. The first time I was looking for a friend’s house whose address I had mislaid, and I peered into the front window of the first house that looked right, only to see that it was wrong. The second was when I found a dog running in the street after dark, and I was looking for his family by going door-to-door on the block, hoping someone would recognize him.

        This particular guy was in her backyard, and while that suggests a person who is up to no good, it isn’t a guarantee. Lots of people direct friends to backdoors or kitchen doors, he could have been lost. If he was outside her home she was in no immediate danger, and she had no reason to leave her house, and her children, to attack him.

      • Smart>Impulsive

        I think you missed the part where the mother only saw the back of the man as he was running away. He was literally fleeing from the scene before she even knew he was there. She didn’t recognize him; she had no idea who he was or why he was there. Her family wasn’t in danger at that point (again, running away) but she grabbed her gun and started shooting anyhow.

        I understand using a gun if someone has broken into your house and is a legitimate threat to you or your family, but this woman not only needs a rigid gun safety course, but she should be charged for recklessly discharging a firearm in public (a misdemeanor in Florida) since at the time of the shooting the suspect posed absolutely no threat to her, her family, or her property.

      • Smart>Impulsive

        I think you missed the part where the mother only saw the back of the man as he was running away. He was literally fleeing from the scene before she even knew he was there. She didn’t recognize him; she had no idea who he was or why he was there. Her family wasn’t in danger at that point (again, running away) but she grabbed her gun and started shooting anyhow.

        I understand using a gun if someone has broken into your house and is a legitimate threat to you or your family, but this woman not only needs a rigid gun safety course, but she should be charged for recklessly discharging a firearm in public (a misdemeanor in Florida) since at the time of the shooting the suspect posed absolutely no threat to her, her family, or her property.

    • Edify

      This could easily have turned into one of those situations where a family member gets shot accidentally by following her outside without her knowledge.

    • keelhaulrose

      While I’d rather stay inside than run out I’m not going to count on the cops for my only protection. We don’t have guns, but we have an extremely protective dog who has attacked an intruder before, and we have enough other weapons in the home I’m not too worried.
      But I agree, running outside seems like putting yourself in unnecessary danger. I’ve read too many stories about one criminal drawing someone out of their house to have another break in that I’m not going to put my family in that sort of danger

      • SusannahJoy

        But the cops wouldn’t have been her only protection. She could’ve easily called the cops, put the kids upstairs or whatever, and kept the gun handy in case it was needed.

    • AP

      I think it depends on the culture of law enforcement in the area. I’ve known people who lived in more rural areas where the culture was that your land was posted, and if someone was on your land looking like they’re up to no good, you’re allowed to shoot them, and if you do shoot an intruder, the cops will thank you for saving them the work of having to apprehend the guy.

      In those areas, intruders and trespassers know the score well ahead of time, and it’s their own fault for getting shot. It’s only in cities and suburbs where population density makes people gun-shy (literally) as it’s too easy to make a mistake or have a stray bullet hurt someone else. In urban/suburban areas, homeowners know the score ahead of time, too, and know that if they shoot at intruders without really good cause, they’ll end up in jail.

    • NicknamesAreDull

      I have been around guns my entire life. When I first moved out on my own, I lived in a fairly sketchy area, it was close to the club where I worked and a few of my friends/co workers lived in the complex. One day, after I got home from work, and got ready to go to bed, someone broke in. They had apparently followed me home and thought I would be an easy target. I shot them in the leg, called 911 and saved myself. It took them 10 minutes to get there. I don’t regret shooting him, but that doesn’t mean that I could shake it off easily. I have no idea what would have happened to me that night if I hadn’t acted.

      Sometimes, taking things into your own hands is more effective than calling the cops.

    • NicknamesAreDull

      I have been around guns my entire life. When I first moved out on my own, I lived in a fairly sketchy area, it was close to the club where I worked and a few of my friends/co workers lived in the complex. One day, after I got home from work, and got ready to go to bed, someone broke in. They had apparently followed me home and thought I would be an easy target. I shot them in the leg, called 911 and saved myself. It took them 10 minutes to get there. I don’t regret shooting him, but that doesn’t mean that I could shake it off easily. I have no idea what would have happened to me that night if I hadn’t acted.

      Sometimes, taking things into your own hands is more effective than calling the cops.

      • Chrissy

        In this situation, though, that makes sense. Someone is INSIDE your home. What else were you to do? But the point is, this woman was in her house, he was not. She could have called the cops, and then if he attempted to get inside, taken action.

      • Chrissy

        In this situation, though, that makes sense. Someone is INSIDE your home. What else were you to do? But the point is, this woman was in her house, he was not. She could have called the cops, and then if he attempted to get inside, taken action.

      • NicknamesAreDull

        I understand that. I’m giving an example of someone who owns guns, is responsible and used the law for its intended purpose. As someone who has had to take the law into their own hands, it’s important for me to let people know that not all gun owners are ridiculously irresponsible. I hate that people (like the one in the article) use guns in a manner that is beyond irresponsible, because for every moron, there’s a person like me.

      • ElleJai

        I’m glad you only shot him in the leg. Some people deserve shooting higher up, but it’s hard to judge that on the spot, so the leg was a good choice.

      • ElleJai

        I’m glad you only shot him in the leg. Some people deserve shooting higher up, but it’s hard to judge that on the spot, so the leg was a good choice.

    • Florida is nuts

      The “stand your ground” law isn’t meant to protect people who fire ‘warning shots.’ It is meant to protect the people who are actually in a ‘life or death’ situation. As in, “the intruder was charging me with his weapon drawn and if I didn’t shoot right then, he would have stabbed/shot me,” not, “I saw what I thought could have maybe been a bad guy and to scare him off I started shooting my gun like Yosemite Sam.”

    • Momma425

      Obviously this isn’t true for everyone, but my husband is a registered gun owner. And he knows how to use his guns. He doesn’t leave armed firearms in the house for our daughter to get into- I don’t even think she knows that they are here. Sometimes he chooses to carry his weapon, sometimes he does not. His friends who are also registered gun owners also know how to use their weapons.
      Would I go out and try to shoot someone- even a sex offender? No, I would call the cops because I do not feel very comfortable around guns. Now, if my husband was home and some pervert was creeping at my child (or me, or him) in the window? That sicko better run darn fast, because they’re (rightfully so) getting their leg blown off. AND the cops called on them. Sometimes the cops don’t show up fast enough and the offender gets away. As a parent, it is my job to protect my child and a creeper getting away is completely unacceptable.

      That said, I am assuming that the woman in the story knew this man was a sex offender or something- although at the same time, nobody is innocently peeping through windows in the middle of the night. If that assumption is incorrect, I do agree, she shouldn’t just jump up with her gun and start shooting at random people in the middle of the night.

      I as a person who was raped as a child, I think we are way too easy on sexual offenders. All of those psychopaths need to be lined up and shot point blank after the first offense. The fact that multiple repeat offenders with “likely to repeat again” statuses are allowed out of prison is horrifying to me.

      • Gangle

        It is not clear that this woman knew the man was a sex offender. My Grandfather suffered with dementia, and would often ‘run away’ and go back to his old house, at all hours, because he forgot that he didn’t live there anymore. Each time, the police would be called, because quite rightly the current owners didn’t know who this strange man was that was hanging about outside. What if this guy was not a sex offender and she shot him? What if she knew he was a sex offender, yet she missed and she shot someone walking by? What if she shot a minor? Firing a gun isn’t for ‘warning’ people, especially someone who is already fleeing. Don’t fire a gun unless you are fully intending to kill something.

      • Aldonza

        Yeah, we used to have a real problem with my Grandfather wandering off. As his dementia got worse, he became quite the expert and simply slipping out. He would show up all over the neighborhood, and thankfully, most of the neighbors knew him and would call my Grandmother or bring him back home, but more than once he inadvertently scarred the shit out of some people by just wandering into their yard.

      • Rachel Sea

        I’ve peered into windows after dark for completely innocent reasons, like checking to see if I had the right house when visiting a friend’s new place, or returning a dog. Lots of house-hunters do it all the time. I’ll think twice now I know there are so many people inclined to blow my head off.

      • Gangle

        And oh man, I just reread the part where you said you would like to line up offenders and shoot them. Sick. Ok, but I want to see you be the one to shoot them. Just you. Do you think you could do it??

    • Muggle

      I’m no gun expert. I have guns in my house but they don’t belong to me. But I was always taught that one should never a) point a gun at something they didn’t intend to kill, b) fire the gun at something they didn’t intend to kill, and c) never fire “warning shots”. How stupid do you have to be to do all three in the dark?

      I mean I can’t blame her for wanting to shoot a sex offender, I just think the better option would have been to stay inside and call the police.

      • JLH1986

        She didn’t even know he was a sex offender. As others said it could have been someone who had dementia and was confused, someone confused on a house for sale (people think a house for sale gives them free reign to walk around the property, even when people still live there). I’m going to protect what’s mine with a gun, but only after I’ve exhausted every other option before pulling my gun. I’m NOT chasing them out the dark to fire a warning shot.

      • Rachel Sea

        A warning shot is more likely to kill or injure a bystander. Remember the story about the guy who fired off a round while cleaning his gun, killing an Amish girl a mile away?

      • Muggle

        I don’t remember that story…

      • Rachel Sea
      • Muggle

        I think I remember hearing snippets about it now. But yeah, this is why people shouldn’t fire “warning shots,” even into the ground.

      • Muggle

        I think I remember hearing snippets about it now. But yeah, this is why people shouldn’t fire “warning shots,” even into the ground.

      • Muggle

        I think I remember hearing snippets about it now. But yeah, this is why people shouldn’t fire “warning shots,” even into the ground.

    • Blueathena623

      I think people are focusing too much on the fact that the guy is a sex offender. The mom did not know that at the time. True, someone looking in your house at night is probably up to no good, but what if it was someone with dementia or something and was wandering around? I’d call the cops and perhaps yell at the person before going outside, leaving my children, and shooting a gun.

      • Blueathena623

        Also, I do kind of wonder how people are storing/securing their weapons if they are able to use them so quickly. We store our guns unloaded, ammo in a separate place, and guns in a gun safe or with a trigger lock. Maybe I’m underestimating how long it would take to get a gun and load it, but I’m wondering if they are storing the guns loaded or even locking the guns up at all.

      • Muggle

        It takes almost no time at all to load it– my fiance can do it in less than 30 seconds. Finding it would be way more time-consuming, but assuming it’s in a locked cabinet or a safe it might not take very long at all.

        Then again, we’re talking about someone who seems pretty trigger-happy and who lives in “stand your ground” land…

      • JLH1986

        My husband tried it, we keep our stuff separate too. But running it took him almost 2 full minutes to unlock the safe(s), load the gun and get back downstairs. It took me almost 3. I’d imagine if I were truly scared for my life or my husband’s I’d struggle with the safe(s) etc. My husband has considered keeping ammo easily accessible and the gun locked, but feels better that it’s the way it is now. To be able to snatch it and go outside to chase someone down? Would never happen that quickly.

      • Blueathena623

        We have a two story house, but the master bedroom is on the ground flood. Guns, ammo, and keys to safe are all in that room (diffèrent locations) and the phone is in there as well. In a true emergency situation, once I go into that room I’m not coming out. If someone wants to break down my front door and the door to my bedroom, they obviously want to do me serious harm, so I need to be in a place well lit, where I know the layout, and where they are close enough that I can get a couple good shots at close range.

      • Rachel Sea

        It takes me 7 minutes running to get the keys, unlock the safe (combo), unlock a gun case (key), unlock the trigger (key), unlock the ammo (combo), and load. If my hands were shaking, it would take longer. If there were an intruder outside my house, I’d call 911, and grab a sword and ax rather than a gun.

        If I could afford a really good gun safe I would feel better about keeping things locked all together, but in the meantime I want it to be very hard for anyone in my house who is not me to acquire a loaded gun.

      • Rachel Sea

        It takes me 7 minutes running to get the keys, unlock the safe (combo), unlock a gun case (key), unlock the trigger (key), unlock the ammo (combo), and load. If my hands were shaking, it would take longer. If there were an intruder outside my house, I’d call 911, and grab a sword and ax rather than a gun.

        If I could afford a really good gun safe I would feel better about keeping things locked all together, but in the meantime I want it to be very hard for anyone in my house who is not me to acquire a loaded gun.

      • 88Mwife

        We have trigger locks, with the ammo stored in a seperate location. It takes me 2-3 minutes to get my gun unlocked and loaded. Our house is all one floor, and we have no children, so we feel like having a slightly less secure way of storing our guns is beneficial for us now. I have no idea how our set-up will change when we have children.

      • Emil

        I agree, we can’t just look at the end result (the fact that this guy ended up being a sex offender) and work backwards ultimately deeming this as acceptable. For all this mother knew this could have been a very tall/mature looking child.

      • Gangle

        YEs!!! To both your comments… Also, the guy was already running away when she chose to fire her gun… what was she doing?? All of this scares me and makes me glad I live in a country with stricter gun laws.

      • CrazyLogic

        I know! What if there was a house for sale in the neighborhood and he mistook her house of the one for sale? (Happens more often than you think)

        What if his car broke down, his cell battery was dead, and he needed to use her phone to call someone?

        Sure he could have just wanted to rob the place, but there are way to many “what if” factors to just applaud her for firing at a man, that later turned out to be a sex offender…

      • http://www.twitter.com/ohladyjayne allisonjayne

        Thank you! I’m Canadian so clearly a very different culture when it comes to guns than Florida, and stuff like this makes me very happy about that, because I just do not actually understand gun culture.

      • http://www.twitter.com/ohladyjayne allisonjayne

        Thank you! I’m Canadian so clearly a very different culture when it comes to guns than Florida, and stuff like this makes me very happy about that, because I just do not actually understand gun culture.

      • SusannahJoy

        My teacher went for an early morning run, and broke her leg. She was going from house to house banging on doors and looking in windows before someone called the cops on her. I’m glad no one shot at her thinking she was a criminal, she just wanted an ambulance!

      • Blueathena623

        Totally. Believe me, if I found some guy peeping in my window at 11:30 at night, my first thought wouldn’t be “oh, maybe this guy needs help”, but I’m also not going to leave my house and shoot a gun. What if it was someone who needed help? Or what if it was someone really bad, they took me out, and now had easy access to my kids?

    • CrazyLogic

      Well that’s kind of scary and yet another reason to visit California’s Disney World and Universal Studios and not the ones in Florida.

      Also I just realized Maria Guido’s avatar is a woman’s neck wearing a necklace and not a demented drawing of Iron Man…

    • Rachel

      I support her in this matter. What is the average amount of time a rapist in the US spends in jail? Five years, if that? The authorities do next to nothing for victims of sex crimes on this country, so if a woman wants to protect herself and hers, power to her.

    • Rachel

      I support her in this matter. What is the average amount of time a rapist in the US spends in jail? Five years, if that? The authorities do next to nothing for victims of sex crimes on this country, so if a woman wants to protect herself and hers, power to her.

      • Rachel Sea

        But what was the value in firing warning shots into the ground? She was putting bystanders at risk, not the peeper.

    • Mariah Grove

      Since when are we a bunch of helpless sheep completely reliant on the protection of COPS?! While running around shooting in the dark is not wise, neither is letting a sex offended creep around your house. Guarantee he doesn’t come back sniffing around. If she would have waited and called the cops, who’s to say they would have even found him, let alone gotten him off the streets? This mom should not be villainized for doing her best to protect herself and her family, but maybe she should be required to take some kind of firearm safety lol… 3 shots in the dark is pretty silly AND dangerous I can admit.

    • Mariah Grove

      Since when are we a bunch of helpless sheep completely reliant on the protection of COPS?! While running around shooting in the dark is not wise, neither is letting a sex offended creep around your house. Guarantee he doesn’t come back sniffing around. If she would have waited and called the cops, who’s to say they would have even found him, let alone gotten him off the streets? This mom should not be villainized for doing her best to protect herself and her family, but maybe she should be required to take some kind of firearm safety lol… 3 shots in the dark is pretty silly AND dangerous I can admit.

    • Mariah Grove

      Since when are we a bunch of helpless sheep completely reliant on the protection of COPS?! While running around shooting in the dark is not wise, neither is letting a sex offended creep around your house. Guarantee he doesn’t come back sniffing around. If she would have waited and called the cops, who’s to say they would have even found him, let alone gotten him off the streets? This mom should not be villainized for doing her best to protect herself and her family, but maybe she should be required to take some kind of firearm safety lol… 3 shots in the dark is pretty silly AND dangerous I can admit.

    • HS

      I would have done the same thing! Good for her for using the law as it’s intended.

    • HS

      I would have done the same thing! Good for her for using the law as it’s intended.

    • NYBondLady

      Good for her. You can bet that this guy will not be back to her home again, he’ll probably go free and move on to victims that aren’t armed.

    • Copperkroewe

      If law enforcement was so darn good the piece of sh* t sicko would still be in jail after THREE separate charges. Not free to re-offend. Our laws concerning child molesters are a joke. I would have done the same thing that this mother did. FU* K sick pedophiles. A bullet to the head is the only cure IMHO.

    • 88Mwife

      I have 3 dogs over 50 pounds, a FNP-45, and a husband who works nights. I have no fears about my ability to defend myself if someone forced their way into my home, but when some idiot climbed the fence into my backyard and tried to break into my husbands workshop, I called the cops. There is no sense in looking for trouble. You were safe in your home, going outside to shoot warning shots is not ‘taking matters into your own hands to protect your kids’, its needlessly courting trouble and leaving your children alone in the house. What if he had a gun of his own and was a better shot than you? That leaves your children unprotected. The cops are there for a reason. They don’t hand down sentencing, only the courts do that. Don’t blame them for not doing their job and allowing him to re-offend.