Anonymous Mom: A Rapist Moved In Next Door

shutterstock_114870946__1382363338_74.134.205.46I’m not someone who checks the sex offender registry regularly or thinks about it all that much.  I checked it before we bought our house four years ago and maybe twice since.  So when a friend mentioned she had found an old high school classmate on there, it occurred to me it had been a while and it might be worth a look.  I was not prepared for what I found.

I live with my husband and young daughter in a sleepy, little neighborhood full of old homes.  Part of my neighborhood is classified as historical and we often have tour buses slowly driving up and down the street.  We are still considered rural and many here live below the poverty line so we are not without problems but we love it here-one neighbor fixes our furnace, the other leaves homegrown tomatoes on our back porch, my daughters best buddy is her teachers granddaughter, I can’t go to the grocery store without seeing at least one person I know, and our house has a real white picket fence-we’re talking Mayberry here people!  So while I am not naïve enough to think we are safe and nothing bad ever happens here I was lulled into a sense of security that I never felt when we lived in a big city.

And then the rug was pulled out from under me.  As I zoomed slowly in to our neighborhood and then our street it started to dawn on me one of those little red boxes was very close to our house.  Then I realized it was directly across the street.  I almost didn’t want to look at the details.  My heart sank to my knees when I saw first degree criminal sexual conduct.  It sank further when I expanded the list to see another first degree charge, then a second degree charge, and finally kidnapping.  Then my eyes locked on the words TIER THREE and my blood turned to ice.  For those that aren’t aware-Tier Three is the classification given to the most dangerous and most likely to re-offend sex offenders.  I went into overdrive.  Google would save me!  So I started searching and searching for any information about his case I could find.  Maybe this was a Romeo & Juliet case, maybe he was falsely accused but couldn’t afford to appeal, give me something, anything Saint Google!  I searched for hours.  I eventually found that he was sentenced to a minimum of 12 years and maximum of 50 years.  He served 12 and was one year into parole.  When I clicked on the statue for the first degree charge and saw “penetration, under 13 years old” I lost my shit.

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    • AmazingE

      It was for exactly these reasons that I moved back to my hometown a few years ago. I know that bad things happen here all the time, but I just couldn’t take getting the little cards in my mailbox anymore. My anger and anxiety got so bad I couldn’t even leave my house for like six months.

    • Alex

      “”When I clicked on the statue for the first degree charge and saw “penetration, under 13 years old” I lost my shit.”

      “This man kidnapped a 30-something year old woman by knifepoint, drove her 100 miles, raped her, and then let her go.”

      If we assume that the courthouse information is correct (and I would), this would mean that whatever sex offender registry site your state/county maintains is incorrect? One of these sources of information does not contain the whole story.

      • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

        I think what the writer meant is that “penetration, under 13″ could be on the lists that gets you a first degree charge?

      • CMJ

        That’s the way I read it – that was one of the “offenses” that could bring about a first degree charge.

      • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

        yeah. ugh

      • Alex

        I read it as this specific offender’s specific charge of first degree crime was for “penetration, under 13 years old”. Not that “penetration, under 13 years old” was a possible way to receive a first degree charge.

      • Ennis Demeter

        No, that’one of the elements of a first degree sex offense. In other words, a victim under 13 is always first degree, even if there are no other factors, like threat or force.

      • Alex

        I realize that a victim under 13 years would (probably) always be a first degree offense, but it’s not the only way. My point was that the way the article is written, the following phrase “clicked on the statue for the first degree charge and saw “penetration, under 13 years old” indicates that it was the specific charge she looked up.

        If she had written the phrase as “clicked on the statue for a first degree charge and saw “penetration, under 13 years old”, that would indicate that a victim under 13 years is one of the possible ways to receive a first degree charge. The difference between “the” and “a” is a subtle but important distinction in what she’s actually referring to, this offender’s first degree charge or a first degree charge in general.

      • Larkin

        Yeah, I definitely read it that way as well and then was super confused later. Might be helpful to rephrase just a little to make it clearer? Something like, “I clicked on the statute for a first degree charge, and one of the potential offenses was ‘penetration, under 13 years old.’ I lost my shit.”

    • bl

      How does someone likely to re-offend get to serve the minimum sentence??

      I’d want to move, honestly, but I’m reactive like that. If that’s understandably not possible, I would just have zero contact with this guy ever. If he approaches you/persists in talking/seems to wonder about your distance, I’d have no problem saying you found him on the registry and have decided that you and your family are not comfortable having contact. Just having him know that you know and are on your guard could help if he does decide to re-offend.

      And you might not be able to send announcements to neighbors, but could you share via, “Hey. Check the registry. Can’t say more; just check.”?

      • momjones

        I am not sure what the exact laws are in my State, but 3 years ago my neighbor called us to tell us there was a convicted sex offender in our subdivision. I don’t think sharing your fear and concern with neighbors is a problem. In fact, it would be helpful because more people would be vigilant. After I read this article, I checked the list for our zip code, and he is no longer living in the house.

      • alice

        this.

        pretty sure all states have a disclaimer about “you can’t use this registry to harass your new rapist neighbor” but no one is going to prosecute you for having a conversation with a friend. The point isn’t to have a flyer that says “A RAPIST LIVES AT 55 MAIN STREET!” but simply a reminder of the ways you can protect yourself.

        almost the same situation happened where i used to live (the man was convicted of rape and attempted murder of a 20 year old woman) and someone in my neighborhood simply went door to door and handed out flyers for free Women’s Self Defense classes hosted at police station. Word-of-mouth, she conveyed that a rapist lived two houses down.

      • momjones

        Perhaps once more people in the neighborhood know, they can talk among themselves about methods of protecting and watching one another (without being threatening or obvious). When we found out, my husband had just retired, and since there are pictures of the person available, and because we knew what house he lived in, he made it his job to stealthily watch him – when the guy walked in the neighborhood, with or without his dog, when cars were or were not in the driveway, etc. Sometimes the guy would even nod when we drove by him while he was walking. In other words, he knew we knew. Mind you, my children were no longer living in the house with us, so that fear was eliminated, but I decided that I couldn’t let fear paralyze me. I was just more aware. Because my husband also tends to be obsessive about safety – we have always checked that our car and house doors are locked, that the shades are drawn, and that lights are on in and out side the house all the time, it just meant that he would ask if all of that was done four times instead of three.

      • thisanonmom

        In our state dissemination of the information regardless if it’s used to harass, threaten etc is against the law. I am still completely shocked that not only do they release a dangerous and likely to repeat offender (by their own admission) without notifying the community but that we can go to jail if we notify our neighbors ourselves. Adding insult to injury the implementation of Megans Law here is so unclear it took several days to figure out we didn’t just miss a postcard. The various suggestions here of how to get the word out without specifics are fantastic.

      • Felix

        Have conversations about how important it is to check the sex offenders registry frequently

      • Katia

        Maybe they just need the jail spots for stoners! Got to keep marihuana users locked up for everyone’s safety, right!

      • Katia

        Maybe they just need the jail spots for stoners! Got to keep marihuana users locked up for everyone’s safety, right!

      • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ wmdkitty

        Yep, we’re just soooo dangerous, with our munchies and sitting on the couch.

    • K.

      Would it help to set up an appointment with either your local precinct and/or a victims advocacy organization? The police (depending on your town–every precinct is different. Ours is courteous and informative, but another literally a mile away is so overworked they don’t do much for citizens’ request) might be able to give you some advice regarding your rights and his OR some advice as to what they think you should do. A victims’ advocacy organization might also be able to give you some suggestions on how to keep your family safe and/or also give you some additional resources if they feel they can’t help you.

      • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

        This is good advice

    • Paul White

      Something similar happened here lately. I get a notice at work and noticed the address was about 2 blocks from my house for one of them. For repeated sexual assault, with the victims age listed as 12.

      Ugh.

    • Annona

      Well, that’s pretty terrible and I don’t blame you for being upset and afraid. I know you said it’s illegal to pass out fliers in your state…but could you perhaps bring up the issue at a neighborhood watch meeting? If you don’t have a neighborhood watch, start one; they are an awesome way for you to feel connected to your neighbors and responsible for the safety of your neighborhood. Also, I agree with other posters that while you might not be able to pass out fliers with his info, passing out fliers with the sex offender registry url and a suggestion that everyone should check it might be a way around that. It is possible that if enough people find out about him, he will be made uncomfortable enough to move.

      • Annona

        Also…don’t know if he’s renting a room, or staying in a rented house with someone else…but often property management companies have a zero tolerance policy for sex offenders living with tenants . Might be worth finding out who owns his house, who lives there, and if he’s living with them without landlord permission if they rent.

      • Simone

        Yes, but then they end up being unable to find a place to live, and become homeless and less invested in society, so they have even fewer reasons to try to rehabilitate and more reasons to hate everyone.

      • Kat

        I totally understand where you’re coming from and I sure as shit wouldn’t want him living anywhere near me. But I don’t quite understand this logic – if he moves, doesn’t that shift rather than eradicate the problem?

      • BBJim’s Mam

        The only way to eradicate the problem is to kill him, and that is definitely illegal. What would you suggest?

      • Kat

        That’s my point exactly – I’m not certainly not advocating killing anyone! My point was that I fail to see how moving offenders to another place achieves anything but making it someone else’s problem. Sure, I see the attraction if he was my neighbour. But even if he is hounded out of town, then what advice do we give his next neighbours? A few commenters have posted some suggestions based around making the situation that the original poster is in as safe as possible which seems to me to be the most constructive approach to a pretty terrible situation.

      • BBJim’s Mam

        That is both true and fair. Personally I like putting them in
        leper-esq colonies, but that has been shot down in the past.
        I actually checked the registry in my area and was disturbed to find 2 level 3′s living within a couple blocks of me. They have crimes specifically against children and there are a lot of kids in this area, and a daycare at the end of my block.
        Why can’t we put them in their own towns?

      • Alexandra

        you should report – they definitely have laws against being within a certain distance of daycares, no??

      • BBJim’s Mam

        Yea, I think it’s like 1,000 feet, and it feels WAAAAY to close.

      • BBJim’s Mam

        Yea, I think it’s like 1,000 feet, and it feels WAAAAY to close.

    • JLH1986

      I have a very gossipy friend, she has young children and lives in a subdivision. When this happened in her neighborhood (nowhere near her) a friend in the area told her, knowing she has a big mouth. Within 24 hours every parent my friend knew, had that info. So worst case. Find the town gossip…and invest in a security system and defense classes for you and your daughter, even young kids can learn some skills. And report anything suspicious.

    • Mikster

      I’m with your Daddy. Both you AND your daughter should be given gun safety lessons and then practice until you are sharp-shooter level in skill. Eff that.

      • carrie

        Minors having gun access? Are you mad? You are aware that kids with gun access are more likely to kill themselves or a family member than some intruder, right? This country sometimes…

      • Mikster

        Access WHEN ADULTS ARE PRESENT. Like when YOU take them to gun safety classes. When YOU take them to the shooting range for practice.
        I assumed everyone KNEW that the guns and ammo are locked up (in different locations) in the home. @@ Are you dense?

      • Amanda

        If the guns and ammo are locked up in different locations, what good are they for self defense? I’m all for people’s rights to own guns and stuff, but that bit never makes sense to me.

      • Mikster

        Quick-release safes in master bed room.

      • carrie

        Nope, not dense. People think that this opinion comes out of nowhere, but this is based on data. Countries that allow civilians to own guns have higher rates of gun-related deaths. Example: The rate of homocide with firearms is 64 times higher in the US than in Canada. 64 times – and these countries not just murdering people in other ways. Your murder rates here are astronomical compared to other first world countries. Civilians who own guns are more likely to accidentally shoot an innocent person than an intruder. Within 10 days this past spring, 5 children were accidentally shot and killed by siblings who accessed a gun in the home. Look up the proposed gun legislation in California from this spring if you want a list of stats. I’m sure these are not cases of parents just handing guns over kids, as you thought I was suggesting. Weapons can be locked up, and children can still access them. I am far from dense. Though in my time in America, I have learned that this is a particular difference of opinion that is not easily resolvable. It’s just hard for people to swallow when we can clearly see what’s going on based on crime statistics in this country.

      • Mikster

        Why don’t we hear more about these public shootings?
        • A 1997 high school shooting in Pearl, Miss., was halted by the school’s vice principal after he retrieved the Colt .45 he kept in his truck.
        • A 1998 middle school shooting ended when a man living next door heard gunfire and apprehended the shooter with his shotgun.
        • A 2002 terrorist attack at an Israeli school was quickly stopped by an armed teacher and a school guard.
        • A 2002 law school shooting in Grundy, Va., came to an abrupt conclusion when students carrying firearms confronted the shooter.
        • A 2007 mall shooting in Ogden, Utah, ended when an armed off-duty police officer intervened.
        • A 2009 workplace shooting in Houston, Texas, was halted by two coworkers who carried concealed handguns.
        • A 2012 church shooting in Aurora, Colo., was stopped by a member of the congregation carrying a gun.
        • At the recent mall shooting in Portland, Ore., the gunman took his own life minutes after being confronted by a shopper carrying a concealed weapon.

        Winnemucca, Nev., 2008: Ernesto Villagomez opens fire in a crowded restaurant; concealed carry permit-holder shoots him dead. Total dead: Two. (I’m excluding the shooters’ deaths in these examples.)

        Santee, Calif., 2001: Student begins shooting his classmates — as well as the “trained campus supervisor”; an off-duty cop who happened to be bringing his daughter to school that day points his gun at the shooter, holding him until more police arrive. Total dead: Two.

        Appalachian School of Law, 2002: Crazed immigrant shoots the dean and a professor, then begins shooting students; as he goes for more ammunition, two armed students point their guns at him, allowing a third to tackle him. Total dead: Three.

        By contrast, the shootings in gun-free zones invariably result in far higher casualty figures — Sikh temple, Oak Creek, Wis. (six dead); Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va. (32 dead); Columbine High School, Columbine, Colo. (12 dead); Amish school, Lancaster County, Pa. (five little girls killed); public school, Craighead County, Ark. (five killed, including four little girls).

        • December 2012, San Antonio, California: Man Attempts to Open Fire on Crowd at Movie Theater, Armed Off-Duty Sergeant Drops Him

        • Palms Internet Cafe July 2012: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gBYSau64LOc Internet Cafe Shooting. CCW Prevails.Assailants chased out by man with CCW

        http://dailycaller.com/2011/09/28/gun-crime-continues-to-decrease-despite-increase-in-gun-ownership/
        “The FBI recently released its Crime in The United States statistics for 2010. Overall, murders in the U.S. have decreased steadily since 2006, dropping from 15,087 to 12,996. Firearms murders — which made up 67 percent of all murders in the U.S. in 2010 — have followed this trend, decreasing by 14 percent.
        At the same time that firearms murders were dropping, gun sales were surging. In 2009, FBI background checks for guns increased by 30 percent over the previous year, while firearms sales in large retail outlets increased by almost 40 percent. The number of applications for concealed carry permits jumped across the country as well.”

        “As for the second half of the twentieth century, and especially its last quarter, a study comparing the number of guns to murder rates found that during the 25-year period from 1973 to 1997, the number of handguns owned by Americans increased 160% while the number of all firearms rose 103%. Yet over that period, the murder rate declined 27.7%.125 It continued to decline in the years 1998, 1999, and 2000, despite the addition in each year of two to three million handguns and approximately five million firearms of all kinds. By the end of 2000, the total American gunstock stood at well over 260 million—951.1 guns for every 1,000 Americans—but the murder rate had returned to
        the comparatively low level prior to the increases of the mid-1960s to mid-1970s period.126″
        “In sum, the data for the decades since the end of World War II also fails to bear out the more guns equal more death mantra. The per capita accumulated stock of guns has increased, yet there has been no correspondingly consistent increase in either total violence or gun violence. The evidence is consistent
        with the hypothesis that gun possession levels have little impact on violence rates.127″ http://www.law.harvard.edu/students/orgs/jlpp/Vol30_No2_KatesMauseronline.pdf

      • Mikster

        Why don’t we hear more about these public shootings?
        • A 1997 high school shooting in Pearl, Miss., was halted by the school’s vice principal after he retrieved the Colt .45 he kept in his truck.
        • A 1998 middle school shooting ended when a man living next door heard gunfire and apprehended the shooter with his shotgun.
        • A 2002 terrorist attack at an Israeli school was quickly stopped by an armed teacher and a school guard.
        • A 2002 law school shooting in Grundy, Va., came to an abrupt conclusion when students carrying firearms confronted the shooter.
        • A 2007 mall shooting in Ogden, Utah, ended when an armed off-duty police officer intervened.
        • A 2009 workplace shooting in Houston, Texas, was halted by two coworkers who carried concealed handguns.
        • A 2012 church shooting in Aurora, Colo., was stopped by a member of the congregation carrying a gun.
        • At the recent mall shooting in Portland, Ore., the gunman took his own life minutes after being confronted by a shopper carrying a concealed weapon.

        Winnemucca, Nev., 2008: Ernesto Villagomez opens fire in a crowded restaurant; concealed carry permit-holder shoots him dead. Total dead: Two. (I’m excluding the shooters’ deaths in these examples.)

        Santee, Calif., 2001: Student begins shooting his classmates — as well as the “trained campus supervisor”; an off-duty cop who happened to be bringing his daughter to school that day points his gun at the shooter, holding him until more police arrive. Total dead: Two.

        Appalachian School of Law, 2002: Crazed immigrant shoots the dean and a professor, then begins shooting students; as he goes for more ammunition, two armed students point their guns at him, allowing a third to tackle him. Total dead: Three.

        By contrast, the shootings in gun-free zones invariably result in far higher casualty figures — Sikh temple, Oak Creek, Wis. (six dead); Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va. (32 dead); Columbine High School, Columbine, Colo. (12 dead); Amish school, Lancaster County, Pa. (five little girls killed); public school, Craighead County, Ark. (five killed, including four little girls).

        • December 2012, San Antonio, California: Man Attempts to Open Fire on Crowd at Movie Theater, Armed Off-Duty Sergeant Drops Him

        • Palms Internet Cafe July 2012: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gBYSau64LOc Internet Cafe Shooting. CCW Prevails.Assailants chased out by man with CCW

        http://dailycaller.com/2011/09/28/gun-crime-continues-to-decrease-despite-increase-in-gun-ownership/
        “The FBI recently released its Crime in The United States statistics for 2010. Overall, murders in the U.S. have decreased steadily since 2006, dropping from 15,087 to 12,996. Firearms murders — which made up 67 percent of all murders in the U.S. in 2010 — have followed this trend, decreasing by 14 percent.
        At the same time that firearms murders were dropping, gun sales were surging. In 2009, FBI background checks for guns increased by 30 percent over the previous year, while firearms sales in large retail outlets increased by almost 40 percent. The number of applications for concealed carry permits jumped across the country as well.”

        “As for the second half of the twentieth century, and especially its last quarter, a study comparing the number of guns to murder rates found that during the 25-year period from 1973 to 1997, the number of handguns owned by Americans increased 160% while the number of all firearms rose 103%. Yet over that period, the murder rate declined 27.7%.125 It continued to decline in the years 1998, 1999, and 2000, despite the addition in each year of two to three million handguns and approximately five million firearms of all kinds. By the end of 2000, the total American gunstock stood at well over 260 million—951.1 guns for every 1,000 Americans—but the murder rate had returned to
        the comparatively low level prior to the increases of the mid-1960s to mid-1970s period.126″
        “In sum, the data for the decades since the end of World War II also fails to bear out the more guns equal more death mantra. The per capita accumulated stock of guns has increased, yet there has been no correspondingly consistent increase in either total violence or gun violence. The evidence is consistent
        with the hypothesis that gun possession levels have little impact on violence rates.127″ http://www.law.harvard.edu/students/orgs/jlpp/Vol30_No2_KatesMauseronline.pdf

      • carrie

        Sure. And all of those public shootings that you cited, that were stopped, would likely not have happened in the first place if these folks did not have access to arms. Where I come from, kids don’t go to their family’s arsenal to obtain guns to shoot their schools – because they don’t have that option. And yes, your murder rates are dropping. That’s not the point. They’re dropping from one huge number to a less huge (but still huge in comparison to other first world countries) number. Anyway, I’m not going to revisit this post. It’s obvious here that neither one of us is going to change her perspective. As I said, this is a fundamental difference of opinion that has a lot of basis in the context and culture of where we grew up. All the best to you.

      • Mikster

        Most gun crimes are committed with illegal guns. I’m pretty sure that criminals aren’t planning to turn theirs over with laws that restrict them.

        Anyhow, we can agree on two things: neither of us is going to change their stance, and I wish you the best ,as well.

      • Mikster

        Most gun crimes are committed with illegal guns. I’m pretty sure that criminals aren’t planning to turn theirs over with laws that restrict them.

        Anyhow, we can agree on two things: neither of us is going to change their stance, and I wish you the best ,as well.

      • Simone

        How many stories have been coming out of the States over the last few years of children fatally shooting their siblings? Rarely if ever are guns bought in this way used to successfully defend against attack, more often they are used by attackers who have wrested them from owners, or by children or other innocents who have gained access.

      • Simone

        How many stories have been coming out of the States over the last few years of children fatally shooting their siblings? Rarely if ever are guns bought in this way used to successfully defend against attack, more often they are used by attackers who have wrested them from owners, or by children or other innocents who have gained access.

    • alice

      I totally empathize with you, as I went thru almost the exact same scenario.

      My neighbor had been convicted of aggravated rape in the late 80’s. He and his buddy had taken turns raping and stabbing a young woman in her own car, finally dumping her beaten, semi-conscious, body in the harbor. (highlight of the story is she had been on the swim team in high school; she hit the cold water, regained consciousness, and swam for her life) He served 12 years in prison. And now he was living next door to me. And with a girlfriend!

      I understand the anger and fear you have. But I think this is true: it will subside. You will always be vigilant. And your family will hopefully all learn self-defense (and you will eventually put away the butcher knife!) But your neighborhood, and sanity, doesn’t have to be spoiled because of this person.

    • DeliciousIroning

      When I was a teenager we lived in a house near a sex offender. The people across the street from us did everything in their power to make it known. They put up posters on phone poles with the mans name and phone number, house address. They even made a billboard out of a fullsize sheet of plywood listing the mans name and information with a big “WARNING” on the top. I’m not lying, they put worklamps on it and lit the freaking thing up at night just in case we missed it during the daytime. How none of this was illegal is beyond me but it was a small town with only 2 cops inhabited mostly by rednecks so I guess nobody cared. Funny enough, not once did I ever worry about the guy. The constant reminders of his existence just sort of served to make him background noise instead of a focus. The neighbors across the road however…weird.

    • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

      Making sure all your neighbours know about him is certainly not illegal if you just do it through word of mouth. There’s no law against having conversations about people who just moved in. If everybody knows about this guy, that’s more eyes on his doings. More eyes on him keeps everybody safe. He won’t be able to talk to a kid or a woman without someone staring him down and telling other people about it.
      It’ll effectively shun him in the community, but you know, there are just some crimes I think are unforgivable (i.e. Rape/murder).
      If someone does time for B&E or fraud or selling drugs, I think giving them a chance to move on after time is fair. But serious physical harm or worse? Mm-mm. Those crimes come from a dark place, and I don’t think the prison system does anything or in many cases could do anything to eradicate those tendencies. Be aware, alert the neighbours and approach this together.

    • helloshannon

      I would go over there with my husband, knock on the door and look him in the eye to tell him “i know who you are so stay the hell away”.

    • Amy

      I live in Germany and there is no way (afaik) to obtain such information on any person. This falls under data protection rules.
      I wonder if I’d like to know about sex offenders in my neighborhood or if not bring able to obtain this information is a gift. Don’t know.

      Amy

    • it’s_kate

      This happened to us, too. Less vicious charges, but child molestation nonetheless. Home was never going to be the same. We sold and moved.

    • Ennis Demeter

      Get a big dog. Get two. I once hear a US Marshall on NPR say nothing is a better deterrent. A dog can also alert you to danger and give you time to react.
      It always depresses me that men who commit this type of crime get such short sentences. Ask anyone what crime causes more fear, besides murder, and everyone will say: rape. Kidnapping, threatening with a knife and rape? 12 years?????

      • alicia

        I agree.. I live in New Orleans, the only reason I’m OK with it is because of my dog

      • pineapplegrasss

        I just don’t see how a large dog is going to protect your children walking to school, riding bikes to the park etc. Such a scary world

      • Simone

        Those aren’t really the times a child is most at risk, and I expect that they would have a parent with them then too. In studies done with former offenders, many have stated clearly that the presence of a large dog in the yard or house was enough of a deterrent that they chose another house to enter / burgle / commit an aggressive home invasion.

      • pineapplegrasss

        Honestly no, I see kids walking to school and playing outside unattended everyday. And yes, a dog would deter somebody from entering your yard/ house. But, kids are rarely abducted from the home. And yes, they are molested in the home, but that’s by family and their friends that have been welcomed into the home.

      • pineapplegrasss

        Honestly no, I see kids walking to school and playing outside unattended everyday. And yes, a dog would deter somebody from entering your yard/ house. But, kids are rarely abducted from the home. And yes, they are molested in the home, but that’s by family and their friends that have been welcomed into the home.

      • Larkin

        I’ve heard the same thing! I specifically heard it regarding burglary, but I imagine it’s true for other crimes too. I heard a police officer say that burglars are far less likely to try and break into a house that has a dog, because the dog will a) make a lot of noise and let neighbors/residents know you’re there, and b) possibly attack them.

      • GPMeg

        Completely! We had a very loud dog when we lived in a high crime neighborhood and while she probably would have invited you in for cookies, the folks hearing her bark up a storm at a falling leaf didn’t know that! The only houses on the street that didn’t get burglarized in the two years we lived there were houses with loud dogs.

    • licia

      get a dog…maybe 2

    • Magrat

      This is such a bad situation. On the one hand, we know that laws that limit where sex offenders live and that make their pasts public are harmful and often encourage recidivism by putting people in desperate situations with no support. On a personal level, though, if I knew that I lived that close to a rapist I would also flip my shit, whether or not I had kids.

      The United States really, really needs to emphasize therapy and recovery for sex offenders. The reactionary system we’ve got just doesn’t work.

      • Simone

        Absolutely the system doesn’t work. At the same time, few therapies have been found to be really successful with sexual offenders. But yeah, the punitive approach that makes the US unique in its rates of imprisonment (highest rate in the world by a significant factor) isn’t working. More needs to be spent on rehabilitation.

        I would also freak out at the news that an offender lived nearby, but I doubt that buying a gun is a good idea. A dog is a much better idea, and take basic safety precautions but don’t live in fear.

        The stigmatisation caused by responses like this only makes it harder for offenders to become lawful, productive people again, but that doesn’t mean that the writer’s response isn’t normal and understandable.

    • pineapplegrasss

      of course I check the registry bc of this article, haven’t done that in my new house, and guess what?? ugh!! 4 houses down from me. ‘attempted molestation of a child.’ Wtf does that mean?

    • http://twitter.com/mariaguido Maria Guido

      It’s definitely not illegal to talk to your neighbors. You have every right to tell them what you saw! A personal note isn’t a “flyer” is it?

    • Justme

      Hoy cow. Of course I just went to check the registry of offenders near me. The first guy listed not only lives near me, my daughter’s baby-sitter, my school but is the husband of a co-worker! And he is up at our school….a lot. Ugh. I am sick to my stomach. Indecency with a ten-year-old and he is around kids at my school. Looks like I won’t be sleeping tonight.

      • topper

        That’s definitely a no-no! You should report him – there was a sex offender who came around our school (he was a stepdad, don’t know the charge) and he got in big trouble for not reporting/staying away from the school.

    • Romylove

      My friend was browsing news articles a while back (maybe last year) and saw her sister’s old house in a picture. Turns out the new resident (not sure if tenant or owner) was using that house to manufacture and distribute child pornography. That’ll sure dampen your rosy memories. Her niece’s bedroom was used to rape children.

    • EmaWeatherford

      The Police is giving a full security to the Woman even woman is protected from Rapist and eve teaser .

      http://lumathin.net/

    • ashlea

      kill him . . .

    • Joe bob

      Get your daughter in some self-defense classes. My girls take judo and karate. I pity the man who tries anything with them.

    • Joe bob

      Get your daughter in some self-defense classes. My girls take judo and karate. I pity the man who tries anything with them.

    • Kitiem3000

      There is no registry for murderers. For all you know there are people living nearby that have tortured and killed, but without a sexual assault accompanying it, you will never know. How often do people worry about the hypothetical killers in their neighbourhood?
      Sometimes ignorance is bliss. The registry only causes panic while making it more difficult for truly repented criminals to re-integrate. Twelve years is a long time.

      • Simone

        I don’t think there has been any evidence to suggest that the registry has had a positive effect on personal safety, reintegration, or rehabilitation.

    • SavvyDetroiter

      I work in an establishment below an apartment building in Detroit that receives government grants for providing cheap housing to people with felony charges who have just gotten out of prison…there are 27 registered sex offenders up there ranging from 4th degree “romeo and just-shy-of-18-juliet charges to serious, heavy stuff like “CSC 1st degree with use of restraint and kidnapping.” For the first year I worked there I was terrified….but have come to realize some things: yes, some of those people are just bad, awful people who may be likely (or already have) offended again. However, people in jail for sex crimes are NOT treated well in prison AT ALL….so they may always be deviants, bit the fear of returning to prison is so great that it outweighs their desire to commit these devious crimes. Also, take the charge with a grain of salt…sometimes the charge may sound worse, but it is actually a plea charge having nothing to do with their actual crime. After five years working late nights alone underneath all these people I haven’t had any issues…. and odds are you and your family won’t either!