• Wed, Oct 16 - 4:00 pm ET

You May Want To Rethink Your ‘Delayed’ Vaccination Schedule

shutterstock_112344575__1381951595_142.196.156.251Children who receive their Measles vaccination on time have lower risks of experiencing febrile seizures after the shot. Yet another reason to follow the Center for Disease Control’s recommended schedule instead of constructing your own.

From The Huffington Post:

In the study, children who received their first dose of a measles-containing vaccine at ages 12 months to 15 months — which is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — had a lower risk of experiencing fever or seizures shortly after vaccination than those who received the vaccine at ages 16 months to 23 months.

Previous studies have found that measles-containing vaccines are linked with a small increased risk of seizures brought on by fever, called febrile seizures, one to two weeks after vaccination. The reason for the link is not known, but scientists suspect an increase in virus replication occurring in this one- to two-week time period may cause fever in some children. Previously, it was not known whether a child’s age affected their risk of fever or seizures following measles vaccination.

I know vaccinations are a hot topic. I, for one, am for them. But I totally understand new parents being freaked out with injecting their children. I get it. What I don’t get, is people who construct their own vaccination schedules based on tips from chat rooms and conspiracy theorists.

The one recurring excuse that I have seen about delaying the MMR vaccine was from those who believed in the vaccine-autism link. Something about the brain not being fully developed… I don’t know. I’ve heard parents complain about injecting their kids with vaccinations when they are “too young.” I think some people feel that if they are eventually giving their kids the shots – it’s all good. This research proves a delayed schedule may not be such a great idea.

Here’s how I handled my vaccination anxiety – I had this conversation with my pediatrician:

Do you have kids?

Yes.

Did you delay any vaccinations for them?

No.

Okay. Neither will I.

I’m not a doctor, but my pediatrician is. If she – being a doctor who knows way more about the health of children than I do – puts her own kids on the CDC schedule, that’s good enough for me.

(photo: Oksana Kuzmina/ Shutterstock)

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  • Mama

    Mostly, delaying vaccines is not only useless but leaves your kids unvaccinated for a period of time. It’s dangerous. Vaccines are safe… research is constantly proving they are safe and the schedule is safe.

    • Ann B.

      But didn’t you know, when the CDC and AAP recommend vaccines, it’s for the “$$$” as the commenters like to put it! -.- Their degrees in googleology clearly mean that they are the ones not in it for the money!

    • Andrea

      I had some time not to long ago and decided to actually research the back-up for not vaccinating. Let me tell you: I had to dig DEEP in the depths of google to find it. The vast, vast majority of articles that come up are against delaying or not vaccinating. You have to use some pretty questionable sources to come up with a good “reason”.

      The other thing I don’t understand is where they find doctors that allow this. Because asked my kids’ pediatrician what would he do if I didn’t allow it. He was pretty adamant that it was not a good idea. When I pressed him, he even said that he would strongly recommend that I find another practice if I was against vaccinations. I wasn’t of course, I was just curious how they handled it.

    • Sara610

      Our pediatrician’s office has a hard policy–you vaccinate your kids on time, or they will flat-out refuse to accept them as patients.

      It’s one of the reasons we chose this particular practice.

    • CW

      Any pediatrician who is going to get all paternalistic on me and act like his/her word is Gospel is not somebody I’d want to take my kids to see. I do respect my pediatrician’s training and expertise, but at the end of the day, they’re my kids and I’m going to do my own homework rather than just blindly following what the CDC or the AAP or some other committee dictates from on high.

    • whiteroses

      The thing about that is- for most of them, it’s not about control. Legally, if your child gets a disease under their care, you could sue them for medical malpractice, which could lead to them losing their license.

      Most pediatricians will tell you that a few extra patients isn’t worth the risk.

    • CW

      Here in CA, parents who exercise their right to a religious or personal beliefs exemption have to sign paperwork stating that their doctor has counseled them about vaccination. So that takes care of the legal liability issue. Our pediatrician hands me the little brochure on the CDC’s recommended vaccination schedule, and I sign the paperwork acknowledging that I’ve received the info. But she respects my right to follow a selective/delayed schedule.

    • Simone

      And if she didn’t, I assume you would also respect her right to refuse you her services and refer you on to another practitioner?

    • Sara610
    • whiteroses

      Good for her. I’m glad that you think your research trumps the entire collective experience of the medical community.

      Look, there’s a schedule for a reason- because it’s proven, time and time again, that it’s the optimum way to protect children. It’s funny to me that doctors themselves don’t really seem to be arguing about vaccinations. The only people who do are laypeople on the Internet.

    • CW

      The schedule is all about convenience- cramming the most shots into the fewest visits in order to cut down on the number of times the child goes to the doctor. It is NOT about what is safest for the individual child. There has NEVER been any well-designed, prospective (following subjects over time rather than looking backwards), double-blind, controlled study done by researchers who don’t have a financial conflict of interest in promoting the current schedule comparing the CDC’s recommended schedule with a more spread out one. All the studies supposedly “proving” vaccine safety have MAJOR methodological flaws and/or conflicts of interest on the part of the researchers. I am not anti-vax, and my children do eventually receive all the vaccines against serious diseases spread via casual contact. But I do have a serious issue with giving so many shots in such a short time frame to very young children.

    • C.J.

      I don’t think doctors and pharmaceutical companies really care about convenience. If vaccines were done individually they could probably make more money.

    • Allie

      My husband and I asked about doing separated vaccines, not because we didn’t want to vax but because we were concerned about doing the ones that had several different vaccines in one injection. We were told it is possible to get separated vaccines, but it is more expensive and it means the baby will have 9 shots instead of 3 around the 2 month mark (we’re in Canada). I didn’t want to put her through that when there’s no evidence the combined shots are not safe and effective. I’m no fool. I know the pharmaceutical industry has profit as there driving concern. But at the same time, I know that vaccines are the single greatest modern medical breakthrough, next to antibiotics and… wait for it… hand-washing (sad that one took us so long to work out – homo sapiens indeed).

    • C.J.

      I can’t see making my kids get 9 shots instead of 3 either. I live in Canada too :)

    • whiteroses

      If it was about money, they wouldn’t offer vaccines. Prevention costs a lot less than treatment.

    • JLH1986

      And then your kid who hasn’t had the vaccine or is waiting gets my kid who isn’t old enough to have the vaccine sick. I don’t really think all pediatricians opt not to treat patients for legal reasons, they very likely opt not to do that because not every child walking in their door is old enough for those vaccines and an unvaccinated child could make them quite ill.

    • C.J.

      Young babies and children that have a weakened immune system and can’t be vaccinated. I would think a pediatrician’s first responsibility would be to those that can’t protect themselves. It seems totally logical for a pediatrician to not want to have patients that put their vulnerable patients at risk if they don’t have to.

    • JLH1986

      Agreed. I’ve seen “liability” mentioned and I’m sure that’s a part of it too. But sick babies who can’t be vaccinated or parents who didn’t know or forgot to get their own boosters? I know My dr at the height of flu season will actually say “are you running a fever?” “No” then don’t come to this office. Go to X office in an effort to avoid clients getting sick. I’d actually be pretty upset if I found out my dr. knew someone wasn’t being vaccinated and let them around other kiddos.

    • TngldBlue

      So you did 11 years of study then?

    • Sara610

      Okay, a couple of things about that:
      1) Your “research” (and I would be curious to find out exactly what that “research” consists of and how much of it was comprised of Googling stuff on the Internet) doesn’t carry the same weight as a medical degree. Sorry, but it just doesn’t. The AAP recommendations are based on rigorous scientific testing, which I’m fairly sure you’re not conducting in your living room. Unless you actually do have a medical degree, in which case I’m willing to engage in a discussion about this.

      2) It’s their practice and they have no responsibility to enable or condone practices that they view as irresponsible and reckless, and that might put their patients at risk based on faulty reasoning and “science” that has been repeatedly debunked. You go ahead and go to your pediatrician who’s willing to take that risk in order to appease non-vaxxers. I’m not willing to, and neither is our pediatrician, and I applaud their strength on this.

    • whiteroses

      I couldn’t have said it better.

    • Andrea

      So your degree in Googleology trumps 12 years of education in the medical field?

    • chickadee

      Any and every doctor is allowed to ban patients that voluntarily put people in their waiting rooms at risk.

    • Joye77

      Drs. get to use that term for a reason, because they have a Doctorate which requires lots of years of college and medical school. They are far more educated than me, so yes, yes I would take their word as gospel since they have the education to back it up.

    • CMJ

      How’s med school treating you? Oh wait.

    • whiteroses

      Same boat here. My son’s pediatrician said that if I chose not to vaccinate, he’d quite happily recommend other doctors to me, though I’d have to travel a ways to do it.

      My son’s ped is no-nonsense, admits when he’s wrong, and takes excellent care of my boy. Plus, he knows his stuff. I HATE his front office staff, but he’s amazing.

    • Véronique Houde

      Let’s play devil’s advocate here: If it were true that we had to follow the CDC’s schedule to the letter for all of the vaccines to be effective, how do you explain that different countries have different vaccination schedules? Does that mean that all other countries have ineffective vaccinations for their population? Here for example, the MMR vaccine is given at 18 months, not 15 months. So let’s say that an American mom also gives the vaccine at 12 and18 months. Is it that big of a deal? Let’s think critically about this one.

      For comparison’s sake, here is the Quebec vaccination schedule:

      2,4,6 and 18 months:
      Diphtheria
      Whooping cough
      Tetanus
      Polio
      Flu

      2,4,and 12 months:
      Pneumococcal infections

      12 and 18 months
      MMR

      12 months:
      Meningitis group C
      Chicken pox

      4 and 6 years
      Diphtheria
      Whooping cough
      Tetanus
      Polio

      4th grade
      Hepatitis B

      Between 14 and 16 years of age:
      Diphtheria
      Whooping cough
      Tetanus

    • TngldBlue

      Well the whole point of this article was that not giving the MMR between the ages of 12-15 months and waiting until 16 months or later increases the risk of adverse affects so I’d say yes, that is a big deal at least for children in the US. However on your broader question, it really boils down to geographical considerations taken into account by the governing body that determines the schedule for their own country (or whatever the case may be). We don’t get the same vaccines as Japan at the same time as Japan because children there have different risks than we do here. The ACIP, which is the body that recommends our schedule, take into account when outbreaks happen, where is the greatest risk, what age will it work best, when will it provide optimum protection and so on-all factors that will vary country to country.

    • Véronique Houde

      yes, but Montreal is closer to New York than it is to LA for example. We share a border, we share bloodlines, our borders are open, we have the same diseases and very similar diets. How do you account for the differences between Canada and the US? This is not a Japanese vacc schedule. It is right up above the US.

    • TngldBlue

      I know where Canada is (I live in Michigan, spent many an evening getting my drink on in Windsor)…but they have to account for the whole country, they aren’t setting the schedule based only on NY. We border Mexico too but we’re still not just like Mexico. I don’t totally disagree with you although this new study does make me more inclined to follow the the schedule more closely. I can’t say I show up at my doctors office on my daughters birthday every year and we had to push back most of her 3-9 month vaccines when she had RSV and she was fine but that’s thanks to herd immunity. If everyone just vaccinates when they want herd immunity falls apart so I’m sure that’s part of it also (although that is my own speculation). Alternative schedules just have not been proven out whereas the CDC schedule has.

    • Véronique Houde

      Not trying to argue or stump anyone ;) don’t worry about that. Just trying to push my reflection further is all! Reading up on vaccinations and what’s up with the anti-vaxx movement and then all of the comments on alternative schedules just led me to wonder why, if it were true that you needed to do it a specific way, we do it differently here in Quebec. I wasn’t trying to make you sound stupid, but your use of the Japanese example has nothing to do with the differences between Canada and the US. BTW most of our pop lives near the US border, so even taking into account widespread population, most canadians live very close to the US. But anyway, point is that perhaps this whole 15 month vs 18 month difference in the MMR needs to be analyzed further? Perhaps someone in the field could research how both governments came to choose each date and if it has any impacts? I don’t have access to a VPN to my university anymore so it’s not possible for me.

    • TngldBlue

      It’s a valid question for sure and while I do agree our populations are more homogeneous than say my example of Mexico, we still are different countries. And out of 50 states only 13 border you. So around 1/4 of the country-that’s a lot of country left over :) And even within our country, states are vastly different-a disease is going to spread faster in say New Jersey than Mississippi. The polio epidemic of 1916 is a good example. It devastated the northern US but didn’t reach Canada. Obviously times have changed, travel between the two is much more often and likely so seems like there would be more standardization between the two but from what I’ve read they don’t account for these things-they look specifically at the US and it’s risk factors. I mean it makes no sense to me that neither Canada or the European Union have the same schedule across their own regions.

    • Véronique Houde

      Yet… Is it me or the current epidemic rates between the US and Canada are similar? If that is correct, there is perhaps something to be said about the rigidity of the current american and canadian standardized vaccination calendars.

  • Cee

    “What I don’t get, is people who construct their own vaccination
    schedules based on tips from chat rooms and conspiracy theorists.”

    THIS, a thousand times THIS!!

    Sometimes I feel biased parent bloggers and parent message boards are responsible for unfortunate choices vulnerable mothers who seek help make for their children and themselves. But then I realize that some parents will research until they find the person that will validate their choices.

    • JLH1986

      Things I will listen to moms about if/when a baby JLH comes around: burping techniques, diapers that don’t leak, ways to help a baby latch on, best formulas to prevent gas, how to calm upset bellies, toys that stimulate, ways to soothe baby before bed. Things I won’t: anything that could lead my child to paralysis, brain damage, death. Those things I will talk to a trained professional about and if I’m not satisfied or worried I’m not getting all the info I will get a second opinion.

  • kay

    whenever someone brings up vaccinations on Facebook (on my new feed at least) anyone who dislikes vaccinations has zero facts to give, but lots of feelings.

    So I now have a photo of my baby that i photoshopped “please don’t give me measles” on it to reply with. Because if we’re arguing with feelings instead of facts, cute babies always win.

    • Andrea

      Whatever it takes.

      People who don’t vaccinate should never leave the house.

    • Andrea

      To the obvious non-vaxer who disliked my comment: suck it.

    • CrazyFor Kate

      Can I buy you an Internet drink :)

    • Andrea

      Anytime anywhere! And I’ll buy the 2nd round!

  • Edify

    We seem to have a measles outbreak starting in our country with the potential to escalate with one of people having been to a major tourist theme park before diagnosis. My baby is 4 months old and MMR isn’t until 12 months. It really worries me to think that we could encounter unvaccinated people anywhere and my baby could get it.

    For the sake of those who can’t be immunized, please immunize your children and ensure your boosters are up to date!

  • Rachel Sea

    I cannot imagine leaving my child at-risk for contracting measles for a whole year longer than explicitly necessary. I’ll take the unproven potential for an adverse effect over the proven risks of measles, and encephalitis every day of the week.

  • whiteroses

    What KILLS me about non-vaxxers is the argument that they don’t want to pump their baby full of chemicals.
    Ok. So you’d rather have brain damage, sterility, facial disfigurement, paralysis, broken bones, heart failure, fever, kidney failure, and death. That’s not even the complete list.
    So, yeah, I’ll take the chemicals. And vaccinating on time is not a question. As a parent, I have to do things that I may not like. I don’t LIKE watching my son hurt or cry, but I do like the security I get from vaccinating my son and knowing that he’s protected from deadly diseases.

    • Andrea

      Sometimes I wonder if that’s not a big part of their “reasoning”. They over indulge their kids with everything, over protect them from every conceivable boo boo so they can’t imagine causing them pain.

      And I mean I get it. The 1st time I watched my 2 day old son get a shot I was a mess. I swear to you he looked at me with disbelief in his eyes, as in “how can you DO THIS TO ME???!!??”. I hated it. But it was what needed to be done. This was a tiny thing I could do to ensure that he would not grow up crippled, or brain damaged, or with diminished lung capacity, or that he would grow up at all! How can you NOT do this for pete’s sake!!??!!

    • whiteroses

      I took my son to get his 15 month shots today. I had to hold him down.
      He screamed, and it tore my heart to pieces. But, to me, vaccinating is part and parcel to being a good parent. Sure, your kid may not die due to the mumps, whooping cough, measles, diphtheria, flu, pertussis, rotavirus, tetanus, or chickenpox, but why in the hell would anyone deliberately take that chance? It takes more than one injection to provide immunity. So delay vaccinations all you want— just know that your kid isn’t protected until you do it.

      As a parent, I’m going to make a lot of choices on my son’s behalf until he can make them on his own. To me, this seems like a no-brainer. I know enough about history to know that these diseases are nothing to screw around with. Disease doesn’t give two craps how rich you are or how good your sanitation is.

      I think one reason that the anti-vax movement is so strong is because most modern-day parents have never experienced an epidemic in their lives. Our parents knew what it was like to live with polio. My generation (I’m 30) has never experienced anything like that. And since we haven’t, some of us assume disease can’t touch our kids if we breastfeed (how did it kill kids in the olden days then?) and wash our hands really well. It’s hubris.

    • Andrea

      I shudder to think it would take an actual epidemic for these people to come to their senses. Ugh.

    • whiteroses

      Sad, but true. I don’t want to see any kids die.

      DIE, people. YOU DIE if you get some of these diseases.

    • doxgukka

      the same people who say they don’t want to “pump their kids full of chemicals” are probably the same people taking them to McDonalds or giving them soft drink!

  • Music Mamma

    As a mother, there are some chances I am not willing to take. I am not willing to drive with my children unsecured, to cross a parking lot not holding their hands, or even to allow them to ride their bikes without helmets. One more chance I am unwilling to take is to allow my children to be exposed to life threatening illnesses without the best protection I can provide. They were breastfed over a year, we don’t use anti-bacterial soap and we vaccinate on time every time. Flu shots, too.

    A friend of mine went through having her son diagnosed with leukemia (in remission over a year!) and they don’t know what vaccines are still effective and what they need to boost. Common sense has to win out at some point and we all need to realize that vaccines have been developed to save lives. Duh.

  • CW

    My 2nd child got the individual measles vaccine at 15 months, but because the Feds pressured the manufacturer into discontinuing the separate measles, mumps, and rubella shots my 3rd child was only able to get the combo MMR shot. That I was not comfortable having her get at 15 months. The government should not be interfering with the right of parents to choose individual shots over the combo one. If the individual vaccines are effective and there is high enough market demand, then the manufacturer should be free to sell them here in the U.S.

    • Joye77

      Why would someone want their kid to have MORE individual shots? They combo them to make it easier for the poor kid.

  • doxgukka

    as i have said before. There is a difference between someone who CAN’T vaccinate and someone who WON’T vaccinate. Those who WON’T should keep their kids away from those who CAN’T!

    • Sara610

      Very well said. Herd immunity is absolutely essential for protecting those who

      (for whatever reason) cannot be vaccinated. And herd immunity only works when the vast majority of the population is vaccinated.

      Parents who choose (often based on something they read on Facebook or a chat room somewhere) not to vaccinate are taking advantage of the fact that at this particular point in time, MOST people still do. Unfortunately, herd immunity is starting to break down because of increasing numbers of non-vaxxers.

    • Mariah Grove

      First of all, herd immunity is a myth. One quick google search will prove that. Next, are YOU up to date on every single one of your shots? Have you had all your boosters regularly and recently? Vaccines have an expiration date and unless youre keeping up with yours, you are just as “dangerous” as anyone who is unvaccinated.

    • Sara610

      Yes, actually, I am. And if your “research” consists of “one quick google search”, that proves the point that just about everyone on here is trying to make. You do realize that not everything you read on the Internet is true, right?

    • Joye77

      Out of curiosity I did search. I read one article comparing “forced vaccinations” to communism. Seriously? barf.

    • whiteroses

      If herd immunity is a myth, that’s even more reason to get your kids vaccinated.

      It’s not a myth, it’s been scientifically proven that it’s not (otherwise we’d be dealing with polio the same way our parents and grandparents did), but just for kicks and giggles let’s pretend that it is. They need SOME sort of protection from these diseases, don’t they?

    • EX

      OK. I couldn’t help myself. I had to do “a quick google search” and discovered the following: the Internet is a scary place. It is amazing the difference in results you get if you enter “herd immunity” vs. if you enter “herd immunity myth.” Maybe you should think twice about basing your health care decisions on a “quick google search.”

  • Arlene Adams

    The only thing the term ‘conspiracy theory’ does is prove that you’re not open to alternate beliefs. Often that information isn’t going to be found in the same news channels that promote pharmaceutical companies (often because there is a monetary link). Most things we vaccinate for are no longer issues and they’re promoted to make money. Looking at monetary links sheds a lot of light on why certain things are pushed, and why a lot of medical evidence is buried. If you want evidence, look at the years in which thimerosal was increased in different vaccines, and the link to autism increases at the same time. It was the first thing that won me over, other than being an economic researcher interested in ties between funding for different products, and the members who sit on their corporate boards. There’s a lot of information out there. Everyone has the right to believe what they want. But never dismiss anything without doing real research, and don’t buy into scare tactics that make other people money.

    • Sara610

      Do you know why “most things we vaccinate for aren’t issues anymore”? BECAUSE WE’VE BEEN VACCINATING AGAINST THEM. I really think this is a situation where people are victims of our own success.

      You know Bill Sears, the author of “The Baby Book”? The guy who literally wrote the book on attachment parenting? Pro-vaccine, and he says, point-blank, that the reason he’s so much in favor of vaccines is because he remembers being in pediatric wards where babies and toddlers were dying of whooping cough and polio. You can read what he has to say here: http://www.parenting.com/article/ask-dr-sears-vaccinationimmunization-concerns He’s actually SEEN children die of these diseases, and what happens when people stop vaccinating against them? THEY COME BACK and everyone else pays the price.

      But I am curious–what exactly does your “real research” consist of? I’m not trying to be snarky here, I’m genuinely asking. Because as you say, you should always be open to any new idea that’s backed up by valid, scientific evidence. So if there’s actual, scientifically rigorous, peer-reviewed evidence out there that vaccines are unsafe and do more harm than good, I would really like to see it. Not being facetious or condescending–I truly would.

    • whiteroses

      When it comes to my child potentially killing other children— no, I’m not open to ‘alternative beliefs”.

      I’ve traveled the world a few times over, and if you think that polio or smallpox aren’t issues in other countries, I have a few photos I can show you of children in leg braces that may change your mind. The only reason they’re not an issue here is because of vaccinations.

      The idea that vaccines cause autism has been so thoroughly debunked that I’m not even going to address it. Ah, Andrew Wakefield- the gift that keeps on giving. Autism is a spectrum disorder, which means that you can no more point to any one thing causing it than the man in the moon.

      Vaccines may be costly, but you know something that’s more expensive?
      Funerals.

    • TngldBlue

      Oh no, they are still issues. They just aren’t issues here (yet) because of vaccines. Take polio for example. Polio is still a major problem in various countries-like Pakistan where the Taliban prevent people from receiving the vaccination. And as our world gets smaller and smaller and more and more people stop vaccinating? Those diseases will come back and innocent children will suffer and die. I always wonder about people that think there is a monetary incentive for the medical establishment to push vaccines when treating people with diseases is far more lucrative than preventing them-someone that contracts polio will pay far more dividends to drug companies, hospitals, and doctors than someone who gets some shots.

    • Andrea

      Believe what you want. But your “beliefs” shouldn’t infringe on the health of my kids. So if you choose to “believe” such bullshit, keep your children home. DO NOT expose them to those poor souls who are too young or too sick to be vaccinated.

      Ugh.

  • Mariah Grove

    Yeah, my doctor told my husband and I 8 alcoholic beverages a week was acceptable for pregnant women. I’m certainly not off at the bars blinding following that advice. Doctors are humans too, capable of being wrong. You should do your own research instead of letting other people make important decisions for you.

    • whiteroses

      Alcohol recommendations (which different people metabolize differently) seems to me a completely different thing than vaccinations. If your doctor is recommending 8 drinks a day, they shouldn’t be practicing. But vaccines have proven to be effective.

      Honestly? Yeah, doctors are human and capable of being wrong, but when it’s been PROVEN by not only the force of collective human experience that these diseases can kill (a quick read through of history will tell you that much, and yes, that can be proven by a Google search), why would you take the chance?

    • Sara610

      Alcohol recommendations of 8 drinks a week (and honestly, I wouldn’t continue seeing a doctor who recommended that) were based on the fact that research hadn’t yet been done to show that drinking while pregnant is harmful to fetuses. Do you know what happened once a scientifically rigorous body of research began to show that drinking IS harmful to fetuses? Anyone? Anyone?…….oh, that’s right, doctors started recommending that pregnant women abstain from drinking. And the NIH came out with a recommendation. And that’s for something where your decision to drink or not drink while pregnant just affects yourself and the fetus, not, you know, an entire community of people.

      The vaccine schedule recommended by the CDC and the AAP are based on a body of scientific research, so yes, individual doctors can be wrong, but they’re not recommending this schedule just based on their own whim. A whole lot of research has gone into this schedule, and the likelihood that ALL of that research is wrong is pretty low. Compared to the reliability of what some loon is barfing out on an Internet chatboard, which is not fact-checked or quality controlled in any way, I know whose word I’m going to take.

    • Véronique Houde

      8 drinks a week is roughly once a day. New research has shown that this is not entirely irrational. You might be uncomfortable with it, but people around the world have been drinking this amount of alcohol while pregnant and it hasn’t caused damage. Your discomfort does not equate science.

    • msLiz506

      One beer a day? Makes sense.

  • plazasohdoors

    Nice Post

  • Alex
  • C.J.

    Only in countries where we are privileged enough to have vaccines would people think vaccines are a bad parenting choice. There are countries that still have people left permanently disable from the diseases we are lucky enough to be able to vaccinate against. There are parents that still have to bury their children who die from diseases that we are fortunate enough to be able to protect our children from. I bet those parents would love to have the vaccines so readily available to us. I would be terrified to have a baby right now. I believe I have a responsibility to not only protect my own children from these diseases but also to protect those that can’t. I think this is going to get worse until we start having more outbreaks and us people in privileged countries have to start burying our children again. That is something I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy.

    • http://twitter.com/mariaguido Maria Guido

      Upvote infinity.

  • Leedee

    My doctor uses the delayed schedule automatically, and so does Dr. Sears.

  • Leedee

    My doctor uses the delayed schedule automatically, and so does Dr. Sears.

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