• Wed, Oct 2 - 11:30 am ET

Man Busted For Posting Child Porn Pics Online – Police Sergeant Helpfully Blames Victims

policeNicholas O. Olsen posted pornographic images of 20 women on the internet. Some of these photographs he solicited from women, and others he took himself five to 10 years ago. Some of the photos he received from men who had taken them of ex-girlfriends. He was also charged with sexual assault because he had sex with one of the victims, who was 14 or 15 at the time. The dude is out on a 75,000 dollar bail, wears an ankle monitoring bracelet, and cannot be on the internet. He is due back in court at the end of October. Courant.com has a quote from the police sergeant in the case:

“These young females have to realize that when they take a nude photo of themselves, and they share it with somebody, that photograph is time-stamped forever,” Mullins said. “That image is not going away. It’s not going to disappear, and it’s going to haunt some of the girls years and years later.”

 

These young females have GOT to realize! These young females, some of them as young as 12, have got to realize that when a 22-year-old man gets busted for posting their pictures online, there will always be someone just raring to blame the victims in these cases.

We should all be aware of what our kids are doing online. We should all raise our girls and explain to them that they should never allow themselves to be photographed because it can have horrible consequences. I get personal and parental responsibility. Girls should not be sending naked pics to men or letting them take naked or pornographic images of them because there is a chance they may end up online. But considering some of these girls are 12, I think maybe, just maybe, we should sort of be focusing on how the ONLY crime they committed is being young and dumb and trusting and now they get to have their naked pics floating around the ethers forever and ever. GREAT. How about this, maybe dudes shouldn’t be asking young girls for naked pics or taking naked pics of them? How about it? How about these disturbed revenge porn assholes just stop doing that, and if they see a pic of a naked CHILD on the internets, they alert the authorities instead of asking for a copy to be Emailed to them? How about it? So now not only do these girls get to feel horrible and awful and victimized and embarrassed and guilty about the fact their nude photos are floating around, we get a man telling them “Hey, it’s your fault. You didn’t realize.”

Plus, let’s keep in mind, that one of these young girls was raped. It just floors me that the police sergeant, a man hired to protect and serve, would just reply with “Welp, girls got to realize.”

No, how about this, how about the people who do this, usually men, GOT TO REALIZE that  victimizing a child in this way is a crime. How about that?

(Image: Tumblr)

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  • alice

    what a fucking asshat. “[those photos] are going to haunt some of the girls years and years later.”

    what he left off that sentence was the condition: “…IF they end up in the hands of someone willing to break the law and/or violate your privacy”

    ^^ key distinction.

    to leave that out is to suggest that we should ASSUME every nudie pic has only one path: future non-consented, probably illegal, public dissemination.

    for me, that’s the same as ASSUMING i will be sexually violated if i dress a certain way.

    “boys gonna be boys!”

    • Paul White

      But you can’t control if they wind up in the hands of an asshole or not. Assume, for example, that a lady sends some racy pictures of herself to her boyfriend. He has them on his cell and loses his cell. Asshole finds lost cell and, being an asshole, looks through it and sees nude pics. and shares, because he’s an asshole.

      Common consumer digital communications are NOT remotely secure. Sharing sensitive data like SS and CC #s, nude pictures, account #s, etc through them is dicey as all hell.

    • alice

      this still isn’t compelling enough for me to stop sending my husband naked selfies :)

    • Annona

      Yeah. I used to manage a store where one of the things we dealt in was used electronics. One of the first things we would do was search for and delete all media on the devices. Do you know how many handheld gaming systems and iPhones I have handled that had photos of naked young women on them (and even a couple of videos)? Of course, I immediately deleted them…but I can’t guarantee the same decency and discretion from my employees if I’m not standing over them all the time. Obviously those women shared those images with a man that they trusted…and even if he didn’t maliciously share them later, he stupidly forgot to delete them from his device before he sold it, which could have ended up with them all over the internet.

    • Rachel Sea

      You should always assume that anything you post electronically could wind up in the hands of someone with the worst intentions, that’s just sensible security.

    • alice

      I agree to an extent.

      having your credit card or identity stolen is not on par with having a naked selfie shared among strangers. and it sounds like a lot of people are treating it like it is. there is a very dire, puritanical, rhetoric around this subject.

      “your picture may wind up the wrong hands…it may just become…the decision…that haunts you…. forever!”

      c’moonnnnnn man.

    • Paul White

      As someone whose dealt with CC fraud (thankfully it was quickly squished) I have to say the potential consequences are MASSIVE for those, and likely can outweigh the harm done by nude pictures.

      The hell of it is I’m still not sure where they got my CC info or how they started using it halfway across the state :X

    • Blueathena623

      I once got mine cc info stolen, I’m assuming through a gas station pre-pay pump (this was before they asked for billing zip). Thankfully it was pretty easy for me to prove I had not been charging up 200 and 300 bucks worth of charges at truck stations up and down the east coast.

    • Paul White

      My wallet got stolen at a work event; charges were appearing in La Vernia and Brownsville that evening. It was weird cause I’m 10-12 hours from them, so I guess they just needed the number and security code

    • LiteBrite

      Happened to DH too. They used his cc info to rack up $400 worth of food in a Chicago grocery store. Thankfully his credit card company called him and asked him about the charge, so it was taken care of quickly and efficiently, but he’s still not sure where someone got his info and how they were able to use it in a grocery store.

      Also, I just remembered that my cc info was stolen a few years ago. It was my work expense card, and a charge for a restaurant in Arizona showed up. My boss asked me about it, which was embarrassing. I was like, “I’ve never even BEEN to Arizona much less used a credit card there.”

    • Rachel Sea

      It depends on your age and your field. If you are underage, or work with kids, or in an atmosphere where you are expected to be above reproach, it can absolutely wreck you.

  • Amanda Lee

    I don’t really think he is blaming the victim. Of course, it was extremely poor timing on his part and the situation doesn’t fit bringing up the fact that young girls shouldn’t take nude photos of themselves.

    I think he was trying to warn girls to not be persuaded to take nude photos, let alone send them to people or post them online. Yes, I know we should be teaching boys that if you get a new picture from a girl, don’t be an asshole and share it. But frankly, it’s not really the same thing as saying “don’t dress slutty”. Girls do take nude photos of themselves and share them without coercion or persuasion.

    I’d rather he didn’t use a child porn case to illustrate his point. However, you can’t control other people and what they do. You can, however, decide not to do something, like take nude photos, that could one day be distributed amongst people you know or strangers. I would definitely try to teach my daughter that and I hope everyone else would.

    • Amanda Lee

      Like I said though, COMPLETELY WRONG SITUATION to bring this up.

    • Angela

      It’s not that his concern is invalid, but it could have been phrased so much differently. What if instead he’d appealed to parents to have open discussions with children of both genders about predators and internet safety? Yes, kids absolutely need to be taught about the permanence of online posting and that they should never, ever post or text naked photos of themselves or anyone else. But the victims also need to know that what happened is not their fault. That this pervert preyed on them and manipulated them and that he is 100% to blame.

    • Amanda Lee

      I totally agree. I think people do it out of ease and fear. It’s easier to tell girls “don’t dress slutty” or “don’t send nude pics” then to tell guys “don’t rape girls”. I’ve honestly never heard of any parent I know talking to their sons about domestic violence, rape, etc. It’s an uncomfortable topic, which is no excuse. I’m all for whatever means works. Like I said, if you have a daughter, you can’t ensure every guy she comes into contact with has been taught respect for women and their boundaries. As much as I don’t want to, I would have to tell my daughter, “hey, if you were revealing clothes, a perverted guy could take that as an invitation”. I don’t think this is victim blaming, it’s reality.

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      I talk to my boys about this constantly

    • Amanda Lee

      Yay, I know one person now!

    • Evelyn

      I talk about consent and sexual discrimination to my youngest boy who is 7 and I talk about rape and domestic violence to my 10 year old, and I know mothers of their classmates that do the same. Yes, 7 and 10 are a bit young but then if I leave it until they are adults it may be to late for a girl they know (and not just by my boys doing something nasty but also by them doing nothing to stop or discourage a friend). Because my eldest son is not a big, strong lad who can physically defend himself and the gay bashing bullying (with a sexual harassment element!) has started already I have had to have some of the discussion that I will one day have to have with his sister about avoiding situations and trouble. I really resent the fact that I have to teach one of my sons and my daughter how not to get raped or beaten but I will do it, however I will also make sure that all of them know how wrong I think it for them to do that to someone else.

  • Fabel

    Why is this officer talking about consequences for the girls, anyway? Honestly—& I know most people don’t share this opinion, & maybe it’s too idealistic/impractical— but I wish there WERE no consequences for being naked online. I mean, people take nude pictures of themselves. Even if you’re not sharing them, your phone or email could still get hacked, & like, rather than try to dissuade people from disrobing & posing for the camera (because obviously people are going to do it anyway), I feel like we should all collectively shrug. So what if somebody is naked online? (if they’re of age, obviously!! I more went off on a tangent than commented on this case, sorry)

    • meteor_echo

      Absolutely agreed. I wish there were a “like” button on Disqus :)

    • Annona

      I agree that we might could be less prudish about nudity in this country, but I’m guessing from the article that these photos were of an implicitly sexual nature. They were also of underage girls. So just having them, regardless of whether they were taken voluntarily or not, is a crime. As Rachel pointed out below, it could potentially lead to a young girl being charged with distributing child pornography, and lead to all kinds of unpleasantness for her that is undeserved. So that’s a consequence. And there could very well be a sense of violation, embarrassment, etc that the person in the photo feels due to something she wanted to keep private being shared with a bunch of strangers. That’s a consequence. As for pictures of adults naked on the internet…I mean, I honestly don’t know if I’d care one way or the other if it was me, but not everyone shares the same boundaries. Some people are more private than others. I don’t think the naked is so much the problem as the fact that it was shared with strangers without the consent of the person who is in the photo. Which could be seen as an unwanted consequence, regardless of the age of the person.

    • Paul White

      It also would probably depend on where you live; ideally it wouldn’t much matter but if you’re in a more socially conservative part of the US it could really cause massive social problems.

    • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

      There are jobs too, that people cannot hold if nude photos are found of them. Which completely sucks and I think is unfair. But they exist.

  • Rachel Sea

    In this case I agree. This is not like condemning short skirts, or other victim-blamey garbage, this is girls being dumb about consequences of their own actions. Parents, educators and mentors need to get it into these girls’ heads that nude photos could haunt them forever. It doesn’t matter how much they like the person to whom they are sending their picture, shit happens and photos wind up on the internet for everyone to see, forever.

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      I think it’s hard for a 12 year old to REALLY understand all that, plus, keep in mind, he raped one of them

    • Amanda Lee

      I know Eve, but a pervert can’t get a hold of nude photos of a 12 year old unless she takes them.. assuming he hasn’t forced her too. How would you address this with a 12 year old? You literally have to tell them, “don’t take nude photos of yourself” and explain all the possible consequences. You can’t just be like “well I shouldn’t have to address this with my kid because it’s never the victim’s fault”.

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      The reports didn’t state clearly, but I think some of the pics were snapped in the act :( But yeah I agree, do not take nudes, do not post nudes do not steal nudes or hack nudes etc etc

    • Rachel Sea

      12 year olds understand when you tell them something is illegal. They could be arrested and sent to a residential school for sex offenders or delinquents until they are 18 or 21. They could have the rest of their lives circumscribed against proximity to children, and forever be targets for vigilantism. They could be making it impossible to go to college, hold a job, or have children.

      Murderers don’t have as hard a time living a normal life after release as sex offenders do.

    • Paul White

      Part of that’s because most of us have probably wanted to hurt someone at times (it isn’t just me right?). We may not give in, but the desire is there.
      I honestly don’t htink most of us ever are really interested in raping someone though. I hope.

    • Paul White

      I don’t know how hard it is or isn’t, but if people shout “victim blaming” when someone brings up stuff like this as a possible consequence it makes it even harder to have the conversation to try to get them to understand what the risk are.

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      I think he could have had that entire conversation during a time when he wasn’t asked about a rape case

    • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

      When else is he getting interviewed? No one’s gonna listen to him otherwise. He’s got a platform. We had our State Attorney General come and talk at our middle school about internet safety and he said almost the same thing you’ve quoted the officer as saying in the article to both boys and girls. And it blew their damn minds how easily people can find out who they are and where they’re from (he talked about some of the cases his office has worked). They are really frighteningly unsafe with pics of themselves. They need to hear it, and this officer just came off a case that was very disturbing. He was trying to be a good guy and give a warning. Maybe “girls and boys” would have been better, but I think he is probably not used to a ton of media scrutiny.

  • AnonyMouse

    The police officer isn’t victim blaming. He’s just warning girls that once they take a naked photo of themselves, and send it out, there’s no getting it back, and they’ve completely lost control over who sees it.

    It’s become a pretty common problem for young girls to be sending naked photos of themselves to people, sometimes they know them, sometimes they don’t (Internet relationships), and second, third, fourth, and so on parties seeing them.

    The fact of the matter is, regardless of us teaching that rape is wrong, that taking advantage of people is wrong, that harming people is wrong, there are always going to be predators in this world. There are always going to be people that have a twisted way of thinking, just look at serial killers, and rapists.

    One of the best things we can do is protect ourselves, and make ourselves what they call “low risk.” I’m not blaming the girls, rather I am saying that I liken not sending nude pictures out to parking in a well lit area, or carrying mace in your purse. It’s something you can do to protect yourself.

    Also, I recommend that if you’re going to take nude photos for someone, don’t put your face in it so you can always deny, deny, deny in case for whatever reason they wind up in someone else’s hands. This advice is for adults of course, not children. Underage kids shouldn’t be taking them, period. As you said, they aren’t old enough to really understand what they are doing, and it’s easy for them to be taken advantage of. They are also not old enough to legally give consent.

    This man that did this to these girls is a predator, and my hearts go out to them. This is a terrible thing to have to go through.

  • Annona

    I absolutely agree that he could have worded this better and picked a more opportune time to talk about it. But I’m seeing his message as one that I think is important for young people to understand. Not that anyone has any right to do anything to your body or pictures of it that you don’t want them to do…but that if you do choose to take naked photos of yourself and give them to someone else, you are losing control of those images in a way that might be really sucky for you later.

    Certainly camera phones and social media culture is changing the game…but someone doing something shitty with intimate photos is not new. I remember once having to go full on crazy at my best friend’s ex’s apartment to get back some dirty polaroids of her that he was showing around town after she dumped him. And yeah, she was underage when he took them, and yeah, he was a steaming hot pile of doucheturd and we should have called the cops on his sorry ass. But she was horribly embarrassed by the situation and just wanted her photos back without involving the authorities (or her mother.) Which is why dickhead doucheturds think they can get away with doing things like that…because they feel their victims will be to embarrassed to call them on it. And guys like that deserve to be punished. But I don’t think it’s a terrible idea to also talk to girls about thinking really REALLY hard about that decision to pose for those images in the first place.

  • Byron

    I don’t understand the reasoning behind asking criminals to “quit it”. (paraphrasing the article here)

    Expecting people who’d be fine with breaking the law to…just see the light or something and alter their behavior is not logical or realistic.

    You can’t expect a policeman to say “people shouldn’t be raping 12 year olds or photographing them naked”. That’s just common sense, it’s to be implied by any rational person. For him to say it would mean that the society is one where that is acceptable and that people need to be told it. It would imply that it happens widely enough to be the majority of events. That more girls are photographed nude than not, which is clearly not the case.

    I don’t think you’re a victim if you take a picture of yourself and send it to someone when that someone doesn’t ask for it. Hell, maybe that someone had no desire of recieving it and was a normal person but now you sent an innocent person something which if found on him can make him into a criminal. How is the girl in this scenario a victim and not the man?

    Sure, grooming girls or asking them for pictures is of course bad. I think this is NOT the situation the policeman was describing though. I think he was talking about situations where pictures are used as an alluring tool and ones where the girl is the agent and acts out her own wishes. I think those situations were the ones he was trying to quell. Now, how many of those there are, I have no idea. I’m not a policeman. Maybe someone who is can shed some light to it. That’s how I took his comments anyhow.

    • msLiz506

      “asking them for pictures is of course bad.” But it people do it all the time. I don’t think most young people actually think asking/pressuring for naked pictures is bad, or something to be even remotely ashamed of. Most people think that if the girl takes the photo, the negative consequences are her fault.

      “I think this is NOT the situation the policeman was describing though. I think he was talking about situations where pictures are used as an alluring tool and ones where the girl is the agent and acts out her own wishes.” Why would he be talking about those kinds of situations? The case is about a man who gathered pictures of women and girls that he, other men, and the victims took, and then posted them online, presumably (according to descriptions of the case) without the victim’s consent. This is not about women (and minors) bombarding a guy with unsolicited nude photos that get him in trouble. If that’s what he’s talking about, he’s off topic.

    • Byron

      Really? Pressuring someone to send pictures of themselves naked is seen as a good thing to do? How exactly do you define “young” people btw, since I consider myself young (not a teenager though) but I don’t know anyone who thought of that as a normal thing. It sounds quite an intrusive request if you ask me lol.

      That people do it all the time doesn’t mean that it is the majority of the activities. People kill people all the time but people need not be told that killing people is bad.

      And as for your questioning of why would he be talking about these situations, that honestly is insignificant, the only significant part is that he indeed IS talking about them and this quote of him saying “These young females have to realize that when they take a nude photo of themselves, and they share it with somebody,” clearly showcases that. What else is he talking about if not that? Just because what he’s doing doesn’t make much sense does not give you the right to change it into something else and then be outraged by the new thing that spurned out of your imagination!

      You can say he’s being off topic I guess, sure. That and victim blaming are in a whole other galaxy though.

  • Momma425

    In all fairness to the police officer- a lot of men get these photos because the young girls have sent them to their boyfriends. Who then turn around and send them to their friends and post them to the internet, and they get in the hands of creepy perverts.
    The problem is two fold: teenage boys need to stop asking girlfriends to send naked pictures of themselves, and need to stop sharing them with each other. And girls need to stop taking them and sending them out.
    Now the one who was raped? Someone else snaps a photo of a teenager getting dressed or was otherwise not in control of having a naked photo of herself? Yeah, victim blaming and appaulling. But these girls who ARE doing the ones taking the nude photos of themselves do need to understand the full extent of the consequences.

    • nikki753

      It’s true that the comment could have been taken out of context and could have been part of a much longer statement from the officer that did cover all of the bases from “If you share child porn, we will bust you and there will be severe consequences.” to “But parents, please, please catch up with the modern age and help your kids to navigate this terrible territory. These children are victims and the perps are wrong but help your kids to do better.” I’m going to hope it was because if it wasn’t, no amount of training is ever going to help that guy get it.

      The thing is that puberty hits long before kids are fully able to understand the long term consequences of their actions. The article said that some of the girls were 12. Kids. Immature, impressionable, more easily manipulated children. That’s why there are special protections for kids. That’s why there are statutory rape laws. They are vulnerable. They are more likely to buy the blackmail or the ‘if you loved me’ or whatever the line of crap is. The modern puberty talk needs to include having ‘digital is FOREVER’ drilled into their heads. Both genders need to be taught to never ever let anyone take pictures or video, much less to take their own, and to be taught that sending or receiving a picture of a minor, even if you are a minor yourself is wrong and illegal and that countless lives have been ruined because of it.

  • R Zhao

    I think this article is a little unfair. Yeah, he could have made a more balanced statement, but for all we know he did. This could be part of what he said and alone it sounds a bit insensitive. Why put our anger on the sergeant and not on the creep who posted the photos?

    • http://Mommyish.com/ Eve Vawter

      Oh no agreed totally, but why does he blame the girls for sending the pic and not the creep who posted them?

  • gammachris

    You know what? I don’t think he was blaming these victims. I think he’s trying to get young women to understand that when they make a choices to let nude images of themselves leave their custody, there are awful people out there that are totally willing to exploit them. I’ve had discussions with all of my children regarding such things- my daughter AND my sons. It’s not victim-blaming to teach our children how not to paste a target on their own backs. Of course he focused on young women in this instance, because the victims WERE young women.