GOP’s ‘Conscience Clause’ Will Allow Employers Not To Cover A Woman’s Slutty Birth Control Because, Morals!

shutterstock_155272442__1380479079_142.196.156.251The GOP is working overtime trying to make the lives of women in this country as hard as possible. They don’t want us to have abortions – but they also don’t want our employers to pay for our contraception. Makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it? No, it doesn’t, but we don’t look to Republican congressmen obsessed with dismantling women’s rights for logic, now do we?

From CNN:

House Republicans have added a measure aimed at limiting contraceptive coverage to the spending bill coming up for a vote Saturday night, a spokesman for Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kansas, told CNN.

A senior House leadership aide confirmed that development.

The so-called “conscience clause” would allow employers and insurers to opt out of preventative care for women which they find objectionable on moral or religious grounds. That prominently includes birth control, which most insurers are required to provide for free under current Obamacare rules.

“Conscience clause?” So, our employers should be able to judge what is morally right or wrong about our healthcare decisions. “Our” meaning “women” not society as a whole of course. No one cares about the decisions men make regarding their health or sexuality. No one is innately offended when a man decides to use a condom, purchase viagra, or have a basic well visit at a doctor. For some reason, all hell breaks loose when a woman makes a decision regarding her own sexual health, though.

Democrats say the measure is unnecessary because the administration has granted exemptions to contraceptive coverage to religious nonprofit institutions. But advocates, such as Huelskamp, insist that all institutions should be able to opt out of any preventative coverage for women that they find objectionable.

It’s not just religious organizations that could potentially opt out of covering necessary medical benefits for women. Bob over at Bob’s Burger Shack could also decide he doesn’t want the little ladies working for him to get their slutty little hands on slutty, slutty birth control. What the hell is happening? Am I even conscious? What year is it? Who? What? When? Where? Why? So many questions!

I give up.

(photo: PathDoc/ Shutterstock)

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    • personal

      OMG! But don’t give up. Please. Don’t ever give up.

    • Emmali Lucia

      I don’t get it, it’s not like the employers are paying for the birth control. They’re just paying for the insurance, and all the insurances now include free birth control. It’s not even like they should KNOW who’s taking birth control or not.

      I feel like the GOP is trying to create the Taliban.

      • Cee

        Right?! And this seems sorta recently. Before they had fair points, now they sound grossly extreme.

      • Andrea

        Agreed! This is why we can’t have nice things.

      • http://www.whatwouldshethink.com/ Rachelle

        Actually, doesn’t the employer pay a percentage and the employee covers the other percentage of the cost of healthcare straight from their paycheck? (That’s how it’s worked for me, but then again it’s Canaduh.)

      • Andrea

        Usually, but that also depends. Some employers pay more (or all), some pay less (or nothing)

      • http://www.whatwouldshethink.com/ Rachelle

        Truth.

    • Edify

      Wow.

      You guys need a healthcare system that is independent of employment. We have a pretty good healthcare system which includes all aspects of women’s health and then if you want access to private hospitals and particular specialists at reduced cost, we select and pay for our own health fund. Tying your health to your boss has always seemed strange to me but letting your bosses morality impact your health is just ridiculous.

      • GregWhitenerel

        SIngle Payer would keep Ted Cruz’s nose out of the collective VeeJay.

    • guest

      I don’t take birth control for pregnancy prevention. I have PCOS and suffer from almost debilitating ovulation pain. I pop a pill every night before bed and voila, I’m able to function 28 days a month. Magical. Even if I took it so I could completely whore around and be the subdivision tramp whose business is it? These ass hats in Washington need to start worrying about bigger things than random women’s reproductive choices.

      • Cee

        Yep, my girlfriend suffers from PCOS and takes two birth control pills a day to help her. That whore! It is not Washington or any businesses job to worry about anybody’s reason to take birth control. Nobody asks or religiously frets over any other reason.

      • Andrea

        My subdivision tramp position is already filled though! (sorry, that was a funny post)

      • Sara610

        I went on birth control when I was 15 for PCOS……I was on birth control for almost three years before I became sexually active.

        But this does remind me of this awesomeness:

        http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/393824/august-03-2011/women-s-health-nazi-plan

    • Peggy

      Someone needs to start a campaign to allow employers to deny coverage for meds treating ED (erectile dysfunction). I too take BCP to prevent disabling cramps and other lovely accompaniments of PCOS. I just can’t even…..

      • EX
      • Peggy

        good to know!

      • Blueathena623

        I don’t think employers should dictate medical care, so I can’t get behind this. ED involves a loss of function in a body part, ergo medicine and treatments should be covered.
        Believe me, I get the sentiment, but health is health, and having the sex life you want to have, for men and women, is a component of health.

      • G.S.

        Ehh, considering that the gov’t's made up of a bunch of old guys, it’d last a total of three seconds before it got thrown out.

      • GregWhitenerel

        I dunno Peg. If these Octogenarians with 20 year old trophy wives didn’t have ED medicine, I shudder at the thought of their palsied little fingers poised to fire off weapons of mass destruction as a substitute.

    • gummykandi

      How about we let whatever happens to a women’s health be between the woman and her doctor, that she trusts to help her make the best decisions for her. Leave ‘morality’ out of it.

    • Blueathena623

      Why do they care?
      So, companies don’t want to pay for maternity leave, but also want to opt out of birth control. Hmmmm.
      And while I FULLY support everyone’s sexual freedom, why do these “morally opposed” people seem to ignore the fact that even heterosexual married couples (you know, god’s chosen ones, please please note my sarcasm) use birth control other than pulling out?

      • Leafyleafster

        Maybe maternity leave is the solution. Any company that wants to opt out for “moral reasons” is mandated to provide at least a year of 100% paid maternity leave. I’m sure many would re-evaluate their moral stance, and all the ladies get their birth control pills, regardless of why they want them. =)

      • Psych Student

        Yes please to this!

    • Byron

      The moral grounds reasoning is idiotic but I don’t think companies should provide contraception under the guise of “health care”. I mean, I would find it ridiculous if some dude asked for condoms or a vasectomy or something like that to be payed for by his workplace. These are things that you decide to get out of personal choice, not an illness that you caught or an accident that you were in that was out of your control.

      People should pay for these kinds of choices or not make them if they can’, they shouldn’t expect others to pay for their desire to fuck without having kids.

      Now, of course, if there’s an actual medical need for the concraception, one outside of the baby-stopping-effects of it, then it’s a whole other matter and it should be covered. Basically, if you have a doctor’s persciption for medically-persrcibed contraception (kinda like with marijuana I guess) it should be fine.

      • Angela

        Actually, some few insurances will cover a vasectomy but that is beside the point. Men do not get pregnant. If they get their partner pregnant their personal health remains unaffected. On the other hand pregnancy greatly impacts the health of women. Therefore pregnancy prevention should be considered part of women’s healthcare.

      • CMJ

        As much as you might not understand this – prescription birth control IS health care. Do you know what pregnancy does to a woman’s body? It’s insane. Giving birth is expensive and complicated. Not to mention the effects pregnancy and children can have a woman’s mental health. Additionally, hormonal birth control can regulate a woman’s cycle, alleviate cramps, minimize woman with PCOS, and a plethora of other things that happen to our bodies simply for being women.

        And for the record – I pay for my health insurance. I PAY FOR IT. So, I am “paying” for my choice.

        (and vasectomies are covered on many insurance plans)

      • Byron

        I don’t see where any of this makes it ok for other people to pay for all these things to be fixed. It’s not like people don’t know these things. If they choose to ignore them and become pregnant, it is their responsibility.

        Like I said, if it’s for medicenal use and not just contraception, it’s fine. Did you not read the last paragraph of my post or something?

        I don’t think vasectomies should be covered either, btw. It’s like covering breast augmentations or something other that is elective and not life-threatending to not have done. Only things that you’ll die or be severely incapacitated if you don’t get done should be covered. Using condoms or stopping having sex, for both sexes, simply doesn’t count as “life threatening”.

      • CMJ

        Um, who is paying for my contraception? An employer pays for part of my insurance and I pay for the other. They aren’t paying for prescriptions. I AM.

      • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

        “Only things that you’ll die or be severely incapacitated if you don’t get done should be covered.”
        You can die from pregnancy and/or childbirth. You can be severely incapacitated as well. I know a woman who was put on bed rest for the entire time because she was in danger of miscarrying. My cousin has postpartum pre-eclampsia, which is lethal if not closely monitored. You can hemorrhage to death. Your kidneys can fail. I developed a uterine infection and needed to be hospitalized.

        So, if a woman needs BC to prevent pregnancy, she is preventing all these potential health problems. They could happen to anyone, and you often don’t know it’ll happen to you… until it does.

        We women understand this can happen to us. We would like to opt into the risk when we’re ready, not have it imposed upon us simply for having the misfortune of a fertile body that we can’t turn off at will– well, we can. It’s called birth control.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        According to his “logic,” a ton of things shouldn’t be covered. :)

      • CMJ
      • elle

        If you don’t think child birth can be life threatening then you are wrong. But no surprise there

      • meteor_echo
      • Mystik Spiral

        I sure hope you don’t use your employer paid healthcare for a trip to the doctor when you’ve got a little sniffle then. Not life-threatening.

        What a moron. Just when I thought you couldn’t say anything stupider, you try to argue that any non-life-threatening healthcare shouldn’t be covered under one’s policy.

        Just jaw-droppingly idiotic, you are.

      • Alexandra

        Birth control is used to regulate hormones though. This involves acne, PMS, cramps and other things. Obviously not every woman has this, but for those who do it’s truly terrible. I know many women who’s cramps are so bad they come with fainting, diarrhea and/or throwing up. I’ve had cramps so bad I couldn’t even breathe. And painkillers don’t work. The only way I could semi-function on cramps was with naproxen, which didn’t really work (Pain went from a 10 to an 8) but it made me so high I couldn’t function in school.
        Birth Control is MEDICATION, and as such it should be covered.

      • Angela

        This is true but I also feel that plain old pregnancy prevention is a perfectly medically valid reason for women to be prescribed contraception. Women shouldn’t have to scramble for some other justification. Anyone who claims that pregnancy has no effect on a woman’s health has never been pregnant.

      • Blueathena623

        Very true, and this needs to be stated more. I am not minimizing anyone’s medical issues that are treated with birth control, but wanting to have sexy times with every male on the planet is a good enough reason as well.

      • zanne stevens

        Boo- Hoo! – Reading your comment as I go through menopause, I think to myself “You’ve got to be kidding me?” wait, just wait. Never have I asked anybody to pay for my birth control; every woman experiences it and should darn well pay for their own. Get a job and learn to care for yourself – you are part of the problem, not the solution.
        Birth control is a choice, not a medication!!

      • CMJ

        She’s part of the problem because she has a medical need for prescription birth control?

      • zanne stevens

        Don’t advocate that it should be paid for across the board, for every woman…but of course then there will be a whole bunch of leaching cry babies out there saying they need it for medical reasons.

      • CMJ

        You do realize that these are insurance policies that people pay for, correct? No one is giving out free birth control on the corner.

      • zanne stevens

        Sandra Fluke ring a bell…she thinks the gov’t should pay for birth control!

        I don’t think insurance Co’s should either, but that’s just my opinion ` entitled to it.

      • CMJ

        No, she thought her school insurance policy (that she paid a premium for) should cover her birth control.

      • zanne stevens

        Yawn!, neither here nor there – she became a political icon for the left just before a presidential election!

      • CMJ

        Um, you brought up Sandra Fluke. You brought her into the conversation and were wrong about your assertion that she wanted free birth control.

        “Yawn” indeed.

      • elle

        No she didn’t but somebody has been drinking the Fox News kookl aid

      • Dr. Apothecary

        Umm… most insurance companies would rather pay for birth control for a year, at very minimal costs, to a birth. 85% of women not using BC get pregnant in a year. Hormonal BC is a lot more effective than condoms but more expensive when paying full price. $50 or more a month is often a lot when you’re already paying for insurance and your other expenses. Insurance does a whole cost/benefit analysis and realizes their costs will be less when they actually pay for birth control, leading more women to use it.

        And those slutty, “leaching cry babies” that use it for medical reasons… most women who continually use birth control use it because they get a medical benefit out of it. The ones that can’t stand it find another form. The medical benefits are huge. There’s improvements in acne (a lot better than any of the creams that are much more costly), less cramps (which means fewer missed days of work), mood improvements (a lot better than most mood medications), less bleeding (which reduces the risk of anemia), and treatments for endometriosis (which can keep women out of pain and at work).

        As someone who is currently pregnant, I have had to go to the ER due to abdominal pain, which was a lot more than my birth control cost last year for my insurance. I’m getting tons of tests and am seeing the doctor all the time. I have missed a few days of work, and I’ve also just had a few days where I’m less productive, because I don’t feel well. I’ve gotten medications for nausea, and the insurance company will be spending still a lot more money on me.

        If you don’t understand the medical reasons for birth control, the costs of pregnancy, and how insurance companies work, maybe you should recognize your opinion is uninformed and you have no idea what you’re talking about.

      • Mystik Spiral

        Oh, hi Rush. Thanks for stopping by.

      • Psych Student

        The government should pay for birth control. It would do wonders for the health of women in this country. The same people who don’t want to pay for food stamps don’t want to pay for birth control which can help keep families OFF food stamps.

      • Andrea

        Planned Parenthood does, doesn’t it?

      • CMJ

        Condoms, yes. But anything prescription you actually have to make an appointment. Also, they work on a sliding scale so it might be free for some people an a reduced cost for others.

      • Psych Student

        I’m not going to lie, that. Would. Be. Awesome!

      • elle

        Of course it’s a medication. It requires a prescription to get it doesn’t it? You have to go to the pharmacy to get it don’t you? It’s hormones isn’t it? I am led to believe you have no idea what medication is. And why shouldn’t insurance cover it? I’m sure Alexandra has a job. And insurance. Maybe she doesn’t have a job and still has insurance. Either way why shouldn’t her health insurance pay for her medication that she needs? Because it never did for you? Sorry the world has changed

      • CMJ

        My favorite non sequitur – “GET A JOB.”

        Yes, because everyone who advocates for others is a “taker” who doesn’t have a job.

      • elle

        Seriously very annoying.

      • EX

        I know, right? Especially when we’re specifically talking about employer provided health insurance. Kind of implies that we’re talking about people who have jobs, no?

      • zanne stevens

        Good grief, has it ever…

      • Alexandra

        Obviously you never had cramps like I did or else you wouldn’t be saying that, and not every woman experiences it, most women I know have mild cramps that you can work through, but there’s also a good amount who can’t deal without birth control, and I don’t think they should be denied the health care they need.

      • jessica

        I feel you. I used to have cramps so bad I would actually throw up. Turns out I had endometriosis. And interestingly enough and given my condition, if I hadn’t gone on the birth control pills to treat it I most likely wouldn’t have ever been able to have kids.

      • Alexandra

        I have IBS and I think that’s what makes my cramps so painful.

      • EX

        I don’t know what kind of benefits you get at your job but I DO pay for my birth control. Let me break it down for you: my health benefits are a part of the financial compensation I get for doing my job. In other words, if they didn’t offer me those benefits they’d have to pay me more (if you’re unclear on this, look into the history of employer provided health insurance in the US). Additionally, my employer, like most, does not pay my insurance premium in full – I pay a portion of it. So, like most people with employer provided insurance I do pay for my birth control. And I do not feel my employer should be able to object to what my insurance covers any more than they should be able to object to how I spend my paycheck.

      • zanne stevens

        I have great bennies, however I haven’t used the pill for nearly 25 years – I do not recall my insurance paying for it, ever!!

      • EX

        That sucks for you. But my response was really more about your comment implying that Alexandra was some sort of unemployed freeloader looking for a handout. My point was simply that if you have a job, the job provides insurance and the insurance covers your birth control, then you did “get a job and learn to care for yourself.”

      • Blueathena623

        Wow, things have changed in 25 years. My mind is boggled, completely boggled

      • Psych Student

        Yes, and gay people couldn’t get married, and women were probably mostly confined to the home. Ah, the good ‘ol days.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        My periods are 18 days long without it. So…ummm…it’s a medication.

      • Gangle

        lady, go take a pill or something. Do you know how WHINEY you sound?
        “oooh booo hooo! All these women are complaining about PCOS symptoms, which is confusing to me because I don’t understand what it is. But I am going through menopause – MENOPAUSE – because I am the only person to have menopause, and nobody is paying me any attention… They just keep talking about the benefits of free contraceptives WHAAAAAAA”

      • Cee

        Go stick your head in the freezer, Ms Stevens, you’re having an angry hot flash.

      • meteor_echo

        BURN :3

      • Cee

        Also, I’d get a job that would allow me to pay for insurance if you got out of my way, boomer

      • jessica

        Well aren’t you just the specialist little snowflake there is.

      • whatnow

        on birth control, I am a functioning, self-reliant woman who is able to work a 70 hour a week job.
        Off birth control, my cramps are so bad for 3 weeks of a month, that I cannot get out of bed. I also bleed so much that I get dehydrated and require hospitalization
        But yes, by all means, tell me that it’s not a medication and that it is my choice.
        And I’d trade you menopause for this

      • Annona

        “Bad things are happening to me and I didn’t get anything, so nobody else should be able to get anything either!” Oh, the wonderful mindset that is so fucking up America right now.

        When menopause causes you to feel like your uterus has razorblade fingers and is trying to claw its way outside of your body, you get back to me there grandma.

      • CrazyFor Kate

        STFU, please. You clearly know nothing about how society works.

      • Blueathena623

        Do you want to go to a doctor to get a prescription for condoms, or do you want to just go buy them when you need them?
        Also, if you really are hard up (ha ha ha) it is really not a problem to find free condoms.

      • CMJ

        Seriously, Planned Parenthood is like Candyland for condoms.

      • Blueathena623

        Hospitals, public health departments, a lot of doctors offices, etc.

      • G.S.

        Stay away from the high schools, though. There’s always that one asshole kid who stabs the bucket of them outside the nurses office with pins.

      • Blueathena623

        Christ on a cracker that is messed up.

      • AmazingE

        You’re not kidding, haha. I went once after my first kid and the bag the lady handed me was stuffed with like ten different kinds of condoms. Flavored ones, studded ones, tons of different colors….I remember thinking it was almost like a bag of skittles.

      • CMJ

        My best friend worked for PP a while back and they used to send her on outreach things and I went with her to a concert. I kept joking that I felt like the Willy Wonka of prophylactics.

      • elle

        Yeah men will never understand just how easy it is to hold up their end of birth control compared to women.

      • Blueathena623

        Also, can we please Please PLEASE drop the whole “people just shouldn’t have sex if they can’t handle the consequences” line. Its pointless. Pointless. When, in the entire history of humankind, have groups with a decent amount of people abstained from sex? Religious orders (although not as many as you think), some cults that have died out, some personal choice.
        But people are going to fuck. They’re going to fuck out of love or hate or pleasure or punishment or a million other reasons. And sometimes it isn’t a choice. Just sticking your fingers in your ears and saying “la la la don’t have sex” is stupid. Stupid.
        And honestly, covering contraception is one of the few things insurance could cover that actually falls under HEALTH care instead of sickness care.

      • Tinyfaeri

        There have been condoms since the 14th century, and herbal methods for preventing and terminating pregnancy since the beginning of recorded history, so the whole of human history before the puritans agrees with you.

        And I really don’t see how anyone can not view the pill as preventative care, other medical reasons for using it aside.

      • Byron

        I never said people shouldn’t have sex though.I just said that I shouldn’t be paying for their sex and its results. They should have sex as much as they want and they should personally, individually, deal with the consequences. They shouldn’t have sex and then go ask us to pay for the fallout. It is their personal choice to not use contraception, they should be personally responsible.

        You can’t have autonomy while using other people’s money, that’s like having your pie and eating it too and since people wouldn’t be abandoning their autonomy in regards to sexual choices any time soon, they should simply pay up to maintain it.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        I’m pretty sure everyone’s employer’s insurance covers anyone who has a baby. You don’t think you should pay for the consequences of sex, but you already are. “The fallout” of sex (even married sex before you get all defensive about morality) is a baby. And a baby is way more expensive. That’s what doesn’t make sense to me….birth control is so much cheaper. More people using it is better than you having to pay for other people’s babies, right?

      • Byron

        Babies are innocent and carry potential that is unknowable and infinite. I don’t mind paying for them from a philosophical standpoint, who knows how many of them end up being geniuses or awesome scientists or other cool stuff.

        I do mind paying for irresponsible adults’ choices.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        How is taking birth control to prevent pregnancy irresponsible? Isn’t that kind of the opposite of irresponsible? Are you one of those quiverful people that think women should have as many children as their body will allow?

      • Byron

        It’s less irresponsible than simply not giving a damn, sure, that doesn’t mean it is responsible. The actually responsible act is to simply abstain until you can pay for it yourself or to have your partner use condoms or help you pay for it or many other permutations of things that don’t have insurance involved.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        I have paid for my own birth control for years. Now my insurance covers it. So I’m supposed to say, “No, that’s okay. Don’t bother. I got this.” I pay a TON of my paycheck each month for my insurance. I think if they “cover” my birth control, let’s be real, it’s really my money that they’re taking out anyway to pay it with. So I need to refuse that, and pay MORE of my money? Is that what it would take for me to be responsible?

      • CMJ

        Taking birth control if someone can’t afford to bring a child into this world is 100% more responsible than bringing a baby into this world that is not wanted and not cared for.

      • jessica

        Aside from the very simple fact that it is simply not your business (or an employer’s business) WHY another adult has to take a certain medication, have you considered that any given baby could just easily grow up to be a Jeffrey Dahmer or an Adolf Hitler?

      • shel

        But you are already paying for tons of people’s poor choices… That’s sort of how this works… We all put in money and the people who need it get it, and when you need it, it’s there for you.

        This “I don’t want to pay for your choices” line is complete crap. If you CHOOSE to smoke and get lung cancer or emphysema or whatever, your insurance pays for your oxygen tank and your meds. If you choose to not eat right and choose to never exercise, your insurance pays for your blood pressure and cholesterol medications.

        If there was a man pill available that men could take to prevent pregnancy, that should be coveted, too.

        And again, because it always bears repeating… “Free” birth control still isn’t really free, it’s paid for in the premiums I pay for my insurance, it’s just paid at a different time.

        It’s good for our society in general if we all have good access to contraception ( and other preventative health care.)

      • EX

        I don’t understand your argument. How are YOU paying for it? My employer pays for a portion of my health insurance premium. This is a part of my financial compensation for the work I do. It is equivalent to them handing me a pile of cash. In other words, my health insurance is money that I earned, not something that was handed to me. If my insurer covers my birth control that should not be my employer’s business and it certainly shouldn’t be yours.

      • Blueathena623

        You’re grasping at straws and you know it. With health insurance, I am helping to pay for everyone’s everything. I pay for people’s car crashes and stitches when they think they can fly using a towel as a parachute and speech therapy and radiation and 45 bucks for a piece of gauze. I pay for skin cancer for people who use tanning salons and lung cancer for people who smoke and foot amputations for people with diabetes.

        There are some in the deaf community who are highly, HIGHLY morally opposed to cochlear implants, especially in children. If one of these people owns a business, should he be able to strike all forms of hearing assistance off the insurance plan for his employees?

      • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

        This is a perfect analogy. Do Deaf employers have the right to remove from insurance plans these implants that allow children to hear, simply because THEY don’t like it?
        Or is it none of their business? Even if they think it’s morally wrong (Which many do because they think it shrinks the Deaf community and treats Deafness as a disability, which they do not believe it is)?

      • Rachel Sea

        We pay for everything else that everyone does all the time. It’s part of living in a society. Get in a car accident, my taxes pay for your emergency services. Bottom out on a driveway, my taxes will be patching that pavement. Go play at the park, my taxes paid for the grass and structures. Send your kids to public school, my taxes pay for the lot of it.

        We share liability so that we can have a safe and functioning society. A call for individual responsibility is what gets you Victorian London.

      • Psych Student

        Plus, we don’t teach girls to masurbate (which we should), thus apparently only men should have any sense of sexual pleasure w/o consequences. Although there are a lot of sex acts that won’t result in pregnancy.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        Using my insurance, which is a well known company: my husband’s whole cost of a vasectomy was $25 for the copay to see the doctor. Yet my birth control was $50 a pack (a month). That’s totally fair, right?

      • Blueathena623

        What are your tier levels for insurance, and do you take a generic? How much does the insurance pay on your pills? Are the other brands you can take that would be cheaper?
        I’m not trying to be snarky, but comparing procedures to medication is apples and oranges. Under my old insurance a woman could get the essure device (stops fertility) for the cost of an office visit as well.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        Well….it’s odd, because my insurance used to not cover it at all, and it cost me $50 a pack, and I switched to generic awhile because…that’s crazy. Then insurance started covering it and it was still $50 for me (pharmacy told me it cost $150 a pack without….so I guess they raised their prices when insurance started covering it? I don’t know.) Now it’s free. YAY! Doc is switching me around to different brands every few months to try to find one that will stop my insanely long periods. I just take whatever she thinks will work. I understand medicine and surgery are different, but I was trying to point out that it’s weird that the man’s surgery was so cheap while my insurance didn’t value the medicine that did the same thing for women….until the law made them, I guess.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        Having a baby is super expensive for your insurance company. I’m surprised they don’t fling birth control at us like it’s Halloween candy.

      • THRILLHO

        I don’t know how it is elsewhere, but around here, birth control requires a prescription always, not just if it’s needed for medical reasons. I could go in for a doctor’s appointment and say “Excuse me doctor, I plan on having daily orgies with at least 80 men ejaculating in me, can you prescribe the pill?” And the doctor would say “Why yes! Make sure you use condoms too, and let’s get on the STD testing!” So a medical prescription doesn’t actual make a difference, whether I have medical problems or I just want to fuck all the time without having kids, it’s prescription medication. So I’m going to go ahead and agree with your system–if you have a doctor’s prescription and are paying for your health insurance, by all means they should be covering it.

      • meteor_echo

        Awww. I guess the poor ole childfree me should just go celibate, along with my childfree boyfriend.
        Oh wait.
        No, we won’t, and you, along with your ilk, should buzz off. Yes, condoms, vasectomies, tubals, abortions, the pill, implants and spirals should be covered by the US insurance. Or, alternatively, the maternity leave should become longer, along with more available childcare options. Sorry, dudebro, but you guys can’t have this cake and eat it, too.

      • Evil Stepmom

        Awkward point for you: Vasectomies ARE typically covered by insurance. I know this because my husband was able to get one for the price of a copay. So there’s that.

      • Susie

        So you’d rather have your tax dollars (and significantly more of them) go to pay for the social services that parents receive because they’ve had more children than they can afford? Do you understand what foster care costs for the children who have to be removed from their parents’ care due to neglect or abuse? And those are the sever cases. There are plenty of kids out there who aren’t “technically” abused or neglected, but are raised in an environment where they are likely continue the cycle of reliance on others.

      • Annona

        I’m one of those women who needs birth control to function. I’ve been on some form of it my entire adult life, long before I ever saw my first penis. I’ve had insurance that paid for it, and insurance that didn’t, and I’m here to tell you that they can have it when they pry it from my cold dead hand because without it my life is very very unpleasant in ways you can’t imagine. It’s medicine, just like antibiotics or everyone’s favorite Viagra…and I pay my insurance premiums every month, so they should more than cover a 100.00 shot every three months.

        And, yeah, I read all of your paragraphs, and I see that you very charitably left women like me out of your judgement. But there is a flaw in your argument. HIPA laws prevent discussion of anyone’s medical records with anyone who is not authorized to see them…and so unless a woman wants to grant that kind of transparency to her employer, the CEO of Hobby Lobby has no idea what I’m using my birth control for. So what does a woman do? Get a note from her doctor to take to her nosy boss? “Dear Nosy Boss, I promise that Anna’s ladybusiness is a hot mess and she needs her birth control to not die. Thanks.” These employers and their Republitard puppets know that isn’t possible; they’re not talking about exemptions for medical need, because the men who are fighting for this legislation think vaginas have magic powers to reject rape sperm and that there IS no medical need for slutty dirty birth control. They’re going to blanket deny birth control coverage, based on religious belief of the employer. They’re not talking about any other “elective” form of medical treatment. They are specifically focusing on birth control, for women only. That’s the dangerous precedent we’re talking about here, and no amount of mansplaining is going to change that. Do you want your employer to be able to dictate what medical treatment you can and cannot have, based on his or her interpretation of an ancient religious text? If this is allowed to happen, what will be next? Jehovah’s Witness employers can refuse to allow employees to use their insurance for blood transfusions? Christian Scientist employers can refuse to offer medical coverage at all?

        How about everyone keeps their “morality” out of other people’s benefits, we all PAY for our insurance (because those who have insurance through their jobs pay for insurance, it’s not a gift) and we all get the medical treatments that our doctors think are necessary for us without our employer or his preacher getting involved in the process at all?

      • alice

        i can’t believe no one has brought this up yet, but:

        the majority of insurance companies DO provide coverage for vasectomies. as well as many other men’s sexual health issues, including Viagra prescriptions, and sometimes penile implant surgeries. so maybe dudes should STFU about insurance companies paying $30 for my birth control scrip.

    • Angela

      And of course the bill specifies that employers are only able to deny women care they find morally objectionable. Plus preventative care could mean just about anything. What’s to stop employers to deny women access to pap smears or physicals on the grounds of “moral objection”?

      Insurance is not a gift my employer bestows upon me. It’s a benefit that I earn, like my paycheck. My employer doesn’t get to dictate how I use my paycheck nor should they choose how I utilize my insurance.

      • Blueathena623

        Mammograms are so dirty, with those boobs all exposed. Makes me sick to my stomach.

      • Tinyfaeri

        Pap smears are worse, they involve the v-a-g-i-n-a.

      • Andrea

        *collective GOP gasp*

      • Cee

        You mean…down there?!

    • zanne stevens

      What a bunch of wining, sissy, takers we have here – You all need to grow up and learn how to take it like a woman. How do you suppose my grandmother, your grandmothers felt when they didn’t even have the luxury of a pad, never mind a tampon? Oh, and BTW, there was no birth control until the early 60′s. Enough said – this generation is nothing but a bunch of pansies..

      As a woman and a tax payer I have to disagree with your moronic excuses as to why an employer or the gov’t should fund your choice!!

      • CMJ

        As a woman and a taxpayer, I will gladly fund and advocate for preventative care for women – and everyone else in this country in need.

        You can call me a whiner, sissy, and a taker all you want.

      • zanne stevens

        Good for you, i disagree!

      • Blueathena623

        The sad fact is a good many people are just dumb and have no concept of the future. The lack of foresight permeates everything.
        So they can’t grasp the idea that a tiny, minute fraction of a cent that might go to increased contraception usage will ever benefit them because that fraction of a cent is gone NOW and the benefits don’t come immediately.

      • elle

        So what if my grandma and great grandma didn’t have birth control? We have it now why shouldn’t we be able to have it? They didn’t have half the life saving meds or hell even ed meds we have now. Should we not get to use those either? And nobody is advocating for insurers or the government to pay for it nos just our health insurance which we already pay for.

      • CMJ

        Right?

        Screw that polio vaccine!

      • elle

        I agree let’s all die/get horribly ravaged by polio again! Sounds awesome

      • http://twitter.com/mariaguido Maria Guido

        BRB. Going to bang my head against a wall now.

      • G.S.

        Who needs Paxil? NONE O’ YA’S!

      • Psych Student

        Yes, women having the chance to have consequence free sex is terrible! Back to the good ol’ days before color televisions, microwaves, computers, internet, and cell phones. Back to a time when marital rape was legal and women could only protect themselves from pregnancy if their partner agreed to wear a condom (I’m not sure when reliable diaphrams came into the picture).

      • http://www.whatwouldshethink.com/ Rachelle

        I can hear the rustling of grandmothers and great-grandmothers around the continent turning over in their graves over this comment.

      • Alexandra

        How is wanting to work without taking unnecessary medical leave being whiny?

      • I pay too

        What? Really? I have to pay your social security, Medicare and your “personal choice” not to save money for retirement but you don’t here me b****ing about it, even though my sluttly slutty generation is predicted to draw very little of it. Sorry but all Americans get some type of entitlements and not just the one you deem appropriate.

      • zanne stevens

        Don’t put words in my mouth!? I have already prepared for my retirement without counting on Social Security, which I may add I have been paying into for nearly 40 years, but hey, the way things are going there won’t be any for me either in just 10 years from now. But no worries ladies, if your insurance decides to drop you and your pill, there’s always O’Care waiting to pick you up. HA!

      • momjones

        It seems that menopause has made your brain pure mush. But don’t worry, if your insurance decides to drop you, you can rely on your retirement funds and maybe even the Affordable Care Act will “pick you up. HA!” You’re a troll, and your infantile talking points are an insult to any woman with any critical thinking skills.

      • zanne stevens

        Nice – I take Amberen and I pay for it with my own. You are the hero of your own little world… to another low information troll
        http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/will-obamacare-cover-birth-control

      • CMJ

        Yes. The ACA mandates free preventative care for ALL people. Included in that is hormonal birth control. This article is from 2010….so, um, old news.

        What’s your point?

      • zanne stevens

        First of all, this is not old news, just happened to have saved that article- nothing is old with regard to OBamaCare. Secondly, I would never take hormone replacement drugs due to the side effects. I have very good “bennies”, but for who knows how long with this new gov’t mandate. Interesting! Why don’t you research how this new O’Care will affect you and your BCP?!

      • CMJ

        let’s see how will Obamacare impact me and my insurance plan (that I pay over $250/month for):

        I now have access to free preventative care that includes pap smears, mammograms, and various forms of birth control. I have access to free colonoscopies as preventative care. My husband has access to free prostrate screenings and other preventative medicine. When I have a baby, I will get a free breast pump (thanks O!). I no longer have a lifetime maximum on my insurance plan if I get very sick. I also cannot get dropped or denied insurance for a pre-existing condition.

        Let’s see what else…oh,my little brother now gets a montly subsidy to by his own insurance because his job doesn’t offer him health insurance and he doesn’t make enough money to afford a policy on his own.

        With all due respect – go fuck yourself.

      • Andrea

        Preach it!

      • momjones

        Which is it? You take “Amberen and I pay for it with my own” [sic], or “I would never take hormone replacement drugs due to side effects”? Because the last time I checked, you need a prescription for Amberen. If you are going to copy and paste talking points from “The Weekly Standard” you need to at least keep track of some of the bull shit you are slinging.

      • zanne stevens

        Insurance doesn’t pay for the good stuff and you f’n know that.
        what they want to pump you with is junk…
        http://www.amberen.com/about-menopause/symptoms-of-menopause/hormones-and-weight-gain-in-women-over-40/natural-estrogen-replacement-therapy

        Take a pill!

      • CMJ

        Weird. Mine does. I pay for it and I worked my butt off to get a job that has good insurance.

        The difference between you and me, however, is that I understand how incredibly lucky I am to have a good job with good benefits (even though yeah, I worked my ass off to get it) that could be taken from me at any second. I wouldn’t wish that pain on anyone else. Which is why I advocate for others who aren’t as fortunate to have those same opportunities. If that makes me a bad person in your eyes…so be it.

      • I pay too

        So since you have prepared you won’t be taking anything out right?… Forgive me but by your logic I should also be able to decide where my tax or insurance dollars go. Since Medicare and Social Security won’t have as big of an impact for my generation, as in we there won’t be a lot to take out, we should be able to decide well it is of no benefit to me and not pay the tax. If the government cant afford to pay you what you put in meh that’s your problem. That is the juvenile attitude you take toward this issue. “It doesn’t directly affect me so I don’t care.” Sorry being apart of a republic sometimes means supporting things that are not good for you personally but help the country as a whole.

      • zanne stevens

        You really think you’re something aye?! Like I said, there will not be any funds available by he time Mr OBama is done with us.

        let me tell you what directly affects me. Paying for EBT abusers…paying taxes for Schools when I have no children attending. etc, etc. It affects us all. And now you have the borders open and we’re being flooded with immigrants, that we will have to provide for.,,, Is this all you know

        “Sorry being apart of a republic sometimes means supporting things that are not good for you personally but help the country as a whole.” Are you kidding?! never mind!!

      • CMJ
      • Susie

        “paying for EBT abusers…paying taxes for Schools.” LOL. You know what’d be cheaper than paying for EBT to help kids get food and schools to help kids get an education? Birth control to help prevent unwanted pregnancies.

      • Andrea

        You need to STFU now. Seriously you are a menace to progressive society.

      • zanne stevens

        ROFL!

        Kiss my blarney ars dbag!

      • meteor_echo

        We’ll kiss it indeed. With a rusty, tetanus-ridden rake.
        On behalf of my great-grandmother, who had 12 kids and ended up with only 2 surviving, on behalf of my grandmother who had to divorce a violent husband and was lucky to only have one kid due to a diaphragm, on behalf of my mother who was the victim of reproductive coercion and had a kid she didn’t want from a guy she didn’t like, and on behalf of the childfree me – go choke on your ~opinion~, you antiquated, sexist mummy.

      • Gangle

        Great comeback….

      • jessica

        I think you protest too much. First, you repeatedly claim to be so bored and annoyed by this whole conversation yet you just can’t seem to stop commenting. Second, you keep going on and on and on about how perfect and responsible and magical and hardworking you are in comparison to all of us stupid, irresponsible, lazy bitches. Kinda makes me think you’re playing the opposite game here if you know what I mean.

      • Joye77

        I am convinced that Zanne stevens is a troll, or maybe I just don’t want to think that any sane, intelligent person would make these comments.

      • zanne stevens

        eat me!!

      • Joye77

        Are you 12? Because that is how mature that was.

      • Blueathena623

        For a rather decent percentage of her life, my grandmother didn’t have air conditioning or antibiotics but she got her milk delivered. My father in law didn’t get indoor plumbing until he was 10, and he’s only 40.
        Oddly enough, some things were different in the past, but yet we have progressed. Weird.

      • EX

        If you want to argue that insurance companies shouldn’t cover birth control, then argue that point. Calling a group of hardworking individuals who pay insurance premiums “takers” makes it hard to even have a discussion with you about this point.

      • Andrea

        They also didn’t have penicillin, and anti-biotics and a slew of other life-saving medications. Are you suggesting insurance only ought to cover things that were available only in the 60s because people back then sucked it up and so we should too?

      • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

        Wait, what choice? The choice to have a working uterus? I didn’t choose that. It just happens because I’m a 30-year-old woman. The choice to have sex? I mean… is that the choice you’re referring to (Which implies all adults who wish not to procreate should be celibate, even regardless of their relationships)? Or the choice to not have children, which requires steps taken to prevent nature from taking its course?
        See, if you let nature take its course, that costs everybody money. It costs less money to prevent unwanted pregnancies. So, as a taxpayer, this bothers you why?
        We live in a community in which we all in some way pay for the lives of others: roads, schools, law enforcement, etc. You will either pay for unwanted pregnancies via insurance premiums or you will pay for BC via insurance premiums. One is vastly cheaper.
        I truly, on every level, do not understand your grievance.

        Also, our grandmothers, due to a lack of many gynaecological and obstetrical advances, plus research, suffered far more stillborns, SIDS, and maternal death, etc. and were pregnant incredibly often. Very scary.

        These women didn’t shun BC because BC was for pansies. They just didn’t have it. Once it was available, women started taking it in droves. Why? Because it’s the one thing, more so than any other invention, that has allowed women to truly control the direction of their reproductive lives, and thus health, and finances, and education, and career.

        To put such existing control ability above the heads of those who can’t afford it, or to impose the cost of controlling this crucial aspect of life on women, is counterintuitive to intelligent people. Being a woman should not inherently cost more just to exist in a normal adult way.

      • http://twitter.com/mariaguido Maria Guido

        Yes, progress is terrible. We should all be thankful we don’t have to bleed into our cup-shaped hands.

      • Emmali Lucia

        And routinely die in childbirth or have babies that died of totally preventable diseases.

      • meteor_echo

        Yeah, Black Plague on us all.

      • Gangle

        Well I hope you haven’t taken a bunch of pansy medications and treatments like modern, improved vaccines, antibiotics, breast screenings, pap smears, MRIs,… In fact, I am sure any medication or therapy your grandmother (or mine) did NOT have access to you abstain from, because you aren’t a whimp.

      • http://anniedeezy.tumblr.com/ Annie

        Of course, it was also perfectly acceptable to give someone a lobotomy without their consent, commit the elderly to state hospitals where they would regularly die of sepsis caused by fecal matter rotting into their bed sores, and test the effects of untreated syphilis on brown people. Good ol’ days, amirite?

        People pay for their medication, and their insurance, in labor to a company that is obliged to, in return, give them a reasonable co-pay for the treatment they require in order to have a reasonably acceptable quality of life. This includes family planning, a luxury that women didn’t readily have those decades ago, correct; but we do, having earned the right to have careers instead of popping out baby after baby despite the health and economic risks of doing so.

        I for one enjoy not living in the dark ages.

      • Guest

        My grandmother DID have birth control in the sixties.

      • Evil Stepmom

        I’m pretty sure the medications that you receive for your menopause weren’t around when your grandmother and great-grandmother would have wanted it. Technology is just the worst.

      • Roberta

        They had several miscarriages and potentially died during childbirth? I mean, that’s how my grandmothers did it. And pads have been around in some form since the 1800′s.

      • CrazyFor Kate

        Yup, my great-grandmother almost died from an illegal abortion. Today, if I wanted one I could get it quickly, safely, and free – though there are plenty of options out there to keep from from needing one in the first place, God willing. Why do people think that’s such a bad thing?

      • CrazyFor Kate

        Coming from a country with universal health care, including birth control, all I can tell you is that your attitude is that of a barbarian.

    • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

      So, wait… what is immoral about taking birth control? Non-religious persons involved in the employment of others have no business casting moral judgements on their employees to the tune they opt out of free BC coverage.
      No abortions, no contraception… so what is the end result of that? I think we know the answer there.

      • Blueathena623

        And the thing, I have to wonder, with this religious people and their moral objections, how religious are they really? Or is more of the murky semi-religiously that mainly focuses on women keeping their legs shut.

      • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

        Oh, I think it’s the latter.

      • Andrea

        There aren’t very many religions that forbid BC all together. So this whole thing is just bullshit.

      • FormerlyKnownAsWendy

        Catholicism comes to mind as being one of few who forbids it, and most of us completely ignore this part of the religion and take it anyway. If I followed that I would be on my way to having 12 children just like my grandmother. It is bullshit!

      • Emmali Lucia

        Are Catholics against hormonal birth control, too?

        I know Judaism allows hormonal contraceptive but not condoms.

      • Andrea

        ALL forms of pregnancy prevention except for natural family planning. (i.e. counting days)

      • http://wtfihaveakid.blogspot.ca/ jendra_berri

        All of it, if it’s artificially introduced. Ironically, as I understand it, the man who created it wanted it to be compatible with church teachings, thinking, “Well, if a woman’s infertile window is indefinite, then the rhythm method is way more effective, and thus better!” The church did not agree.

      • Cassy

        I do not hold this view, but many Protestant Christians feel that hormonal birth control is abortive because in theory, an egg could be fertilized but prevented from implanting due to the thin uterine lining that the pill causes. I’m not saying this logic is good, just that it’s the way a percentage of the population feels.

    • EX

      I wish I had something clever to say in response to this but all I’ve got is: aaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrgggggggghhhhhhhhh!

    • THRILLHO

      I’m not American, so this doesn’t effect me. That said, I’m on birth control because I have severe iron deficiency, acne, and debilitating menstrual cramps. They’d rather pay for iron supplements, pain pills, and acne treatment than birth control which solves all those problems as well as prevents me from needing to use further healthcare that would be needed after getting knocked up? Sounds like solid logic.

    • Momma425

      I hate that birth control might not be covered for some women- because it is used for more than just preventing pregnancy. Birth control is prescribed for acne, heavy periods, and endometriosis- just to name a few! This would be like me saying, “I don’t believe in infidelity, and therefore I am refusing to cover antibiotics because people might be taking it to cure the clap they got from cheating on their spouse. Might be taking it for any number of other ailments, and it is none of my damn business anyway…but I’m going to go ahead and just not cover it.”

      I think democrats should respond by saying that they are not going to cover Viagra or prostate exams.

    • Lamont Briggs

      Wow, people are stupid, just so stupid.

    • Simone

      Oh, just, super mega fuck that. That is fucking fucked.

    • http://anniedeezy.tumblr.com/ Annie

      Bob’s Burgers, you say?

    • http://anniedeezy.tumblr.com/ Annie

      This isn’t an issue of morality, it’s a Trojan horse for the “small government” movement.

      The Republican party is getting more and more extreme. Most political moderates would classify as liberal these days, compared to the tea-bagging baby boomers and Nascar fans ruining the country for the rest of us.

    • Athena A

      Wow health care in the US never ceases to baffle me. Why on earth do employers pay for your health care? Why do they have anything to do with health care at all? Here, employers have insurance to cover work accidents, but anything else you might have is covered by your insurance, which you pay yourself. The amount you pay is based on your age, e.g. the older you are of course the more you pay as you’d have more health costs. I’m 26 and my fees are still very low.
      I pay like 12 euro for my birth control, it’s a pack of a year’s worth of pills. This system with your employer getting in your personal health care business is ridiculous. Insurance companies would waaaay rather pay for the fairly reasonable costs of everyone’s BC than having to pay back costs of pregnancy care and hospital visits.
      And what about married couples or long term relationships? Condoms for life or what? Feck off. Does being a Christian there mean being all up in people’s faces, such a holier-than-thou attitude. I thought it was God who did the judging, not Tom Dick and Harry down the street.

      • NYBondLady

        Not sure where you stand on this issue, but I agree that employers here are now thought of as “benefits providers.” No one is forcing anyone to use an employer’s insurance. But here a lot of people want the best/most insurance for the least amount of money.

      • EX

        I know right? What is wrong with people for wanting the best for the least amount of money. Personally I am always trying to get the worst for the most amount of money.

      • NYBondLady

        I think I was not clear and should have not implied a cost/benefit analysis; I should have written: “…want the best/most insurance for little/no cost. “

      • EX

        Sorry, I’m still not following. Wanting the best insurance possible and wanting my employer to pay for as much of it as possible is called negotiating my contract not asking for a handout. It is compensation for the work I do. That’s how the employer-based health care system works (whether it’s a good system or not is a whole different discussion).

      • NYBondLady

        Of course. But when the employer doesn’t offer the coverage you want everyone is all up in arms. I think people are missing the point that everyone still has access to birth control, it just may not be paid for. And because it’s not “free” or low-cost, this article was written, no?

      • shel

        Why am I (and my employer) paying insurance premiums if they don’t provide the one type of coverage that I would make any sort of use of? As a woman, I need preventative care. So if they can all opt out of preventative care for women (which is just… ugh I feel stupider for even typing those words… preventative care is the most important part of healthcare!) what is the point of participating?
        My premiums that I PAY will offset the cost of the medications that I use, no matter what those medications are.
        I do wish this wasn’t tied to employment, because like many of the non-american’s have mentioned- it makes no sense. But a proposed single payer plan was shot down because “i don’t want the government in my healthcare” but you want your boss in the exam room with you instead?

      • NYBondLady

        You are not forced to participate in your employer’s insurance. Go find a policy that you prefer. And if you really feel that the cost of premiums will offset the cost of the medications, why not just pay out of pocket??

      • shel

        Because the out of pocket cost would be different from what the insurance company would pay, and ultimately cost me more money. The advantage of insurance is that they get a discount because of volume and deals that they make with pharmacy companies etc. The point is that it wouldn’t be “free” it still has a cost, it’s just not paid directly to the pharmacy.
        Also there is the “unknown” medical catastrophes that can’t be predicted… and sort of the main point of having insurance. If I could be certain that no one in my famly would ever need to see the doctor or go to a hospital or get in an accident, then insurance isn’t such a big deal. But it’s the same reason we have car insurance and home owners insurance.
        And why should insurance pay for people’s cholesterol medication or their high blood pressure medication because they have an unhealthy lifestyle, yet they won’t pay for my medication?
        Why should they pay for antibiotics for a patient who doesn’t need them because they have a virus, but they doctor hopped until they found a doctor willing to prescribe some unnecessary medication?

      • NYBondLady

        You are getting all mixed up. This argument is about what an employer’s insurance company provides. Not what an insurance policy provides. Yes, these two lines are blurred but if someone’s ultimate goal when getting a job is the insurance policy, then they are free to compare policies between employers. But not to demand that the employer they want conform to what they want out of a policy.

      • shel

        Is there an employer out there who can tailor make their insurance policy that they offer on any issue besides reproductive health?
        Can I say as an employer, that I don’t believe in fried chicken, therefore I want to offer a policy that does not cover any highblood pressure medications. Is that an option? Are companies doing this?? For some reason I’m thinking no… so why is birth control coverage different?

      • NYBondLady

        of course. Some dental plans don’t cover root canals, some do. Many specialist doctor visits have a co-pay or are not covered until deductible is met, and furthermore, some have $1500 deductibles, some have $100 deductibles.

      • shel

        Dental coverage and dentists are completely different from medical coverage. Dentists have no obligation to treat the way physicians do, and that is reflected in their billing and insurance.
        And while the cost may vary, they don’t outright deny any sort of coverage for basic health care services, which as much as some people hate to admit it, birth control falls into that category.
        And like we have all pointed out over and over, hormonal birth control in whatever form has many other uses besides the prevention of pregnancy.

      • alice

        I think you don’t understand how insurance policies work. It’s not a “build your burger” bar for each employer. There are tiers of service. Period.

        There’s not a “umm, i really don’t want our coverage to include any xrays, because i don’t belive in radiation” option.

      • NYBondLady

        Yes, but employess have the option to shop around for insurance policies and for employers that offer insurance that they prefer.

      • alice

        but: they still have that same option AFTER obamacare. ?

      • Psych Student

        And it sucks! It’s horrible when I sign up for dental insurance to find they don’t cover fillings. I then had to wait until I could cancel that insurance so I could get something else that covered fillings. It would be nice if all insurance companies would cover everything.

      • Psych Student

        Because out of pocket does not equal cheap. Not a birth control example, but I take Cymbalta (because trial and error has shown it to be best for me). With insurance, it’s about $30 per month. Do you know what it is without insurance? $500!!!! No, I’m not kidding. I don’t know why there is such a difference, but without insurance, I’m boned. Paying out of pocket is not always doable. It sucks that prices are so different. Not everyone can get the “cheap” brand because different meds have different results on each person. Insurance should help cover the costs.

      • EX

        Right, but you see, right now my insurance plan pays for my birth control and they have been since I started at this job (ie before the ACA), I assume because they’ve done their own cost benefit analysis on the subject. If this “conscience clause” is enacted my employer could say, “sorry I have a strong moral objection to women having slutty sex, no birth control for you.” And that would suck. I can’t speak to why everyone else is up in arms but the idea that my employer could object to my insurance company covering something they consider a routine part of preventive care on the grounds of a “moral objection” bothers me.

    • NYBondLady

      I don’t think it’s right to DEMAND that your employer offer the types and scope of insurance coverage that you want. If you don’t like the insurance policies, then drop it and go find the insurance that you want. Starting tomorrow, it should be even easier to do. Employers are NOT in the health care business, why do we treat them as if they are? Capiche?

      • CMJ

        No one is demanding anything. Under Obamacare, preventative care is required to be provided in insurance policies at no cost/co-pay. It’s not about what your business chooses to provide, it’s what the insurance companies now legally MUST provide.

        Additionally, if we’re talking about prescription birth control, an insurance company would rather give it out like candy with no cost to its insured than pay for the costs associated with having a baby.

      • CrazyFor Kate

        I have a heart condition. In the US, I would be lucky to find an insurer to cover me at all. Millions of people are in that situation right now. Some people don’t have a choice.

      • NYBondLady

        not the topic.

      • CrazyFor Kate

        It is absolutely the topic. You are advocating that people who don’t like their insurance policy should just drop it and find a new one. For many reasons, plenty of people can’t do that. It’s a totally screwed-up system from all kinds of angles.

    • Surly Canuck

      I find it curious that they specify preventative care for women. I wonder if they stopped at just preventative care, they worried more people might object. I mean if this truly is a matter of morality, Viagra for people who aren’t trying to conceive could be banned. I wonder how many employers will develop a sudden case of morality just to avoid paying the monthly expenditure. Perhaps the morality clause should come with a morality test.

    • alwaysmoving

      This article, and many of these comments, are missing the point. The Constitution of the United States guarantees freedom of religion, and the freedom to act upon one’s own morals. Whether or not those morals are popular is irrelevant. No one should be forced to act in a manner contrary to their own convictions, and for some people, contributing financially to birth control is morally repugnant. No one other than the author is using the term “slut” in this discussion, or implying that women don’t have a right to healthcare. They are saying that they believe birth control to be wrong. I don’t agree, and I don’t have to agree in order to support their right to act as they see fit. Having a moral viewpoint different from the majority does not require anyone to act contrarily to one’s beliefs as long as their acts are legal.

      Think if it this way: if you lived in Saudi Arabia, where the prevailing opinion of women is that they ought to be silent, shrouded servants, would you sway your views to fit in with that mindset? I think that’s unlikely. So why should anyone else be forced to change their views to fit with yours?

      And, in any case, the few employers that want the right not to act in opposition to their religious convictions are generally Catholic health systems or privately owned companies that are quite clear about their stance, such as Hobby Lobby or Chik-Fil-A. It’s very unlikely that someone might apply for a job at one without realizing that they are not going to have covered birth control. So the solution is simple – if you want a job that provides insurance with covered birth control, apply somewhere else.

      • NYBondLady

        thank you!

      • shel

        Birth control treats more than just sex… it has many uses beyond avoiding pregnancy… so what are those people supposed to do who need it to treat actual medical disorders?
        It’s unfair and illegal for your employer to ask for your medical records or health conditions… So if I need OCPs for a reason, I don’t (and shouldn’t ) have to tell my employer what that reason is. My health information is private for a reason. So by that means these employers will blanket deny often medically necessary medication because it could be used in a way they find “morally repugnant”
        If I find drug abusers “morally repugnant” can I have my health plan for my employees not cover any sort of opiod pain medication, because you never know, some of them might be abusing it.
        There is also the flipside of that freedom in that you can’t force your morals/religious beliefs on someone else. That is what these companies are trying to do to their employees… If you had to agree with every religious/moral/political view of your Boss, these companies would have a hard time finding employees. And then there is this whole business where we separated the church and state, so relgious beliefs of any kind should have nothing to do with politics.

      • NYBondLady

        Where in the constitution does it say that employers must provide healthcare for its employees?

      • shel

        It doesn’t… but that’s how things work in America at the moment. If you want good employees, you offer them good benefits and incentives to get them to work for you.
        It would have been nice if we could have gone to the singlepayer system that was initially proposed, but everyone had a big problem with that, so this is the compromise… and it still has tons of problems. But something needed to change the health care system is broken, insurance companies making record profits while denying all sorts of coverage for their paying clients is bullsh*t.
        Just like this proposed “exemption” is also bullsh*t.

      • NYBondLady

        Whether businesses agree with your employee benefit ideas is up to them. And “record profits?” PLEASE. Health insurance is square in the middle of industry profit margins. http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/datafile/margin.html

      • CMJ

        Not really. I might also be inclined to sue them on discrimination grounds because they are violating my constitutional right to be treated equally as a woman.

        If they want to get rid a preventative care they should do it for everyone – not just women.

      • NYBondLady

        are condoms covered? Do men receive birth control and women don’t? Am I missing something? Is pregnancy a disease? (don’t want to get into this… but this is subjective and the basis of your “argument”).

      • Blueathena623

        Condoms are OTC. Science is still working on a male birth control pill. Pregnancy is a health-related matter that benefits from medical attention.

      • shel

        A man pill would be awesome… and I imagine would change a lot of tunes…
        It does take more than just a woman to get pregnant after all….

      • CMJ

        Hormonal birth control is considered by MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS to be preventative health care. I have said this numerous times – pregnancy and childbirth is not easy on a woman’s body nor her mental health. Additionally, it serves many other purposes in addition to simply preventing pregnancy. Insurance companies would prefer to offer prescription birth control with no copay because it PALES in comparison to the cost of giving birth. Condoms are over the counter. No over the counter drugs are covered by insurance….that being said, anyone could walk into Planned Parenthood at anytime and get a boxful o’ condoms.

        So, like I said above, if you are going to cut out a major preventative and well-care option for women because of your “Conscience” you sure as hell better be willing to cut it for everyone.

      • NYBondLady

        out of curiosity, how many pregnancies are unplanned among the employer-covered insured population? I’m guessing not many.

      • CMJ

        I don’t see what your point is? That everyone who has a job with insurance is having planned babies? So you’re saying that because I have a job that provides me with insurance and I got pregnant it would be planned?

      • NYBondLady

        No, everyone is saying that the cost of pregnancy will outweigh the cost of birth control. Which, of course, it does, on a 1-1 basis. But what if there are only a small number of unplanned pregnancies? The company probably doesn’t really care about the cost of those. I am not talking about you or your antedoctal stories. Just seriously curious about the rate of unplanned pregnanices among the fully insured.

      • CMJ

        Nearly half of the pregnancies in the Country are unplanned. (I believe it’s 48%). I am not sure about people who are not insured vs. those who are…but why would an insurance company care about planned vs. unplanned. And how would they know?

        And that wasn’t an anecdotal story…I really didn’t understand the point of your question.

      • NYBondLady

        see above. 2/3 of unplanned pregnancies are covered by public programs.

      • Blueathena623

        http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/gpr/14/1/gpr140107.html
        Just FYI, near the bottom, costs private insurers 15-17% more to not cover contraception and just pay for those in intended pregnancies.

      • NYBondLady

        yup. Again, not arguing what is in the best economic interest to an insurance company, I think everyone can agree that BC is cheaper than pregnancy in most cases. An employer is not in the health insurance business, that’s where I object about what is required to be covered and not…

      • CMJ

        If they aren’t in the health insurance business then why should THEY object to what is and isn’t covered?

      • NYBondLady

        because they are paying for a large portion of the costs ON BEHALF of the employees AS A BENEFIT. The employees can get 3rd party insurance ouside of work if they choose.

      • CMJ

        I also pay part of my insurance….so, uh, why shouldn’t I get a say?

        See how that works?

      • NYBondLady

        you do get a say. You are not forced to purchase it. I can’t make a pizzeria serve me chinese food because that’s what I want.

      • CMJ

        I’m done with your false equivalencies. Have a nice day.

      • shel

        But they aren’t physicians, how can they determing what should be covered for who and what shouldn’t be (aside from the fact that insurance is not offered a la carte like that where you can pick and choose that specifically) they don’t deserve to know your health history or why you need a specific medication.
        If they offer pharmaceutical coverage, it shouldn’t matter what the drug is or what it’s for. Or they should opt out of all medication coveraged.

      • NYBondLady

        This is so wronge on so many levels. Are health insurance companies full of physicians?

      • shel

        Health insurance companies do use physicians to determine their policy packages and what is reasonable for coverage.
        They use current medical recomendations for preventative care- when kids should have well child visits etc. when routine screenings should be done.
        They call the physician when they don’t want to pay for a hospital admission and the physician explains why it was a medical necessity…. etc.

      • Blueathena623

        Yes, and if their employees file a bunch of large claims, like those that come from pregnancy, that employer will find it harder to get the same rates. Ergo, the cost for the employer will increase. Maybe the employer will just pass on those costs to the employee, who knows. But the fact is, that company will be in a poorer position to negotiate rates.

      • NYBondLady

        So, have employers been reaching out to you for consultant gigs? Did you ever consider that these companies put their moral beliefs before the bottom line?

      • Blueathena623

        No, I’ve just sat on a couple of benefits committees at different institutions. And if more owners are taking reductions in pay to make up any difference in costs, go them. But I can’t see that happening too often.

      • Blueathena623

        You are making my/our argument. An employer is not in the health insurance business — it just provides it as an expected benefit. I never worked at a financial institution, but retirement savings/plans were always included in my benefits package. Never worked at a travel agency, but I got vacation days too.

        Let the medical professionals and those in the health industry hash out what is best.

      • NYBondLady

        Acutally, the retirement and savings plans are much like the health insurance plans- you were probably offered only a handful of investment options through a Fidelity/Vanguard, etc., when there are actually 1000s of investable retirement vehicles out there. Trave/Vacation? No. not the same. When you were hired you were hired probably for 48 weeks/year or 50 weeks or whatever. The employer does not use a 3rd party to administer your vacation time.

      • Psych Student

        So we shouldn’t support a minority or people? Even if just one percent of the population is aflicted with a problem/disease/disorder/etc. that’s a LOT of people and we need to provide them with help/support/resources/etc. And if it’s as easy providing birth control, then hells yes to that!

      • alice

        BWHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

        yeah, “oops” pregnancies only happen to unemployed, or uninsured

      • Blueathena623

        http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/FB-Unintended-Pregnancy-US.html

        Define many. That majority? No. Enough? Yes.

      • NYBondLady

        Thanks. So, 2/3 of all pregnancies that are unplanned are also from moms who are uninsured (and I didn’t realize that “mistimed” pregnancies count, which idk what to think about that). This is interesting.

      • Psych Student

        Maybe women with insurance don’t have unplanned pregnancies because they have birth control. There may also be a correlation between people who get jobs in which they have insurance and people who have higher levels of education and higher levels of sex-ed (which can go a long way towards people avoiding pregnancy until they are ready).

      • CrazyFor Kate

        A lot, if they can’t afford birth control.

      • alice

        is “old dude who can’t get an erection” a disease? because viagra is covered under Obamacare.

        when nature declares a man is past his sexual prime, we defy nature, and gladly let science intervene. but when couples defy nature’s “natural planning” contraceptive method and opt for a scientific contraceptive method, we call it immoral.

        ??

      • Blueathena623

        Come on kiddo. Playing the “its not in the constitution” game is silly. There are a ton of things not in the constitution.

      • NYBondLady

        I didn’t bring up the state/religion- PP did.

      • Blueathena623

        Do I need to copy and paste your comment?

      • NYBondLady

        “And then there is this whole business where we separated the church and state, so relgious beliefs of any kind should have nothing to do with politics.”

      • Blueathena623

        “Where in the constitution” and so on and so forth.

      • NYBondLady

        um, what do you think this person was implying here? Does the word have to be used for you to understand?

      • shel

        The very first post brought up the constitution… and I pointed out that it goes both ways, and using the constitution to try and force someone’s religious morals on another is actually the opposite of freedom of religion…. and religious morals do not belong in politics in general.

      • NYBondLady

        I guess I don’t see how providing a benefit, on behalf of employees, which is not mandatory, of which similar products can be purchased elsewhere, can be forcing someone’s religious morals on another.

      • CMJ
      • shel

        Because this shouldn’t even be an issue…. Hormone pills/rings are medications. If you offer insurance that covers medications, there shouldn’t be singling out of a specific type medication just because you “object for religious reasons”.
        This is the only medication that this has even come up for debate,and it shouldn’t. It’s a medication that has very important medical uses. All sorts of medications can be used for “amoral” purposes, but no one is trying to cut access to those medications.
        If your policy covers medications, it should cover medications, period, the purpose of said medication doesn’t matter.

      • Psych Student

        I give you a thousand upvotes!!!! Because we don’t allow employers to withold painkillers because some people abuse them and some people have moral objections to abuse of drugs.

      • Rachel Sea

        Morality is a red herring. It’s not about morality, it’s about control.

      • Momma425

        I’m going to go ahead a quote an article written by Soraya Chemaly because she addressed this “religious freedom” nonsense much better than I ever could: “This is not about freedom of religion. If it were, we would, for example, allow Christian Scientists to refuse to pay for coverage of life-saving blood transfusions for employees. Religious freedom means I get to choose whether or not to be religious and if so, how. It does not mean that I get to impose my religion on others. Paying for insurance is part of the way we compensate employees, even when they use their insurance in ways we don’t agree with and are in contravention of our own personal beliefs. I think that it is stupid, dangerous and immoral to chain smoke, especially around children whose lungs it irreparably harms. But, I still have to pay for an employee to have access to lung scans, nicotine patches and oxygen tanks. I do not get to say that my religious beliefs, which include keeping bodies as healthy as possible, make it possible for me to withhold payment of this employee’s insurance.”

      • Mystik Spiral

        Thank you Momma! Wish I could upvote that a bajillion times.

      • Momma425

        I’m going to actually further this. My religion opposes war- I don’t get to get out of paying taxes just because some of that money goes into wars overseas.
        Religious freedom means that I get to go to church and not get persecuted for doing so. My rights end where your rights begin. If I don’t believe in birth control, I have the right to not use it. If I don’t believe in war, I have the right to not join the army. I do not have the right to end your healthcare coverage and deny benefits to my employees based on my personal “morals.”
        Is this really what anyone thinks Jesus would do? Deny women prevention from getting pregnant and have NO support systems in place for mothers to help them when they do get pregnant? Remember, Jesus was a man who hung out with people who were considered to be the scum of society. He performed miracles for them anyway. Even people who didn’t always behave according to his moral and religious standards- he saved them anyway. He washed their feet. I think he would be appaulled.

      • Joye77

        Wonderful momma! I love this. Thank you.

    • CrazyFor Kate

      Your morals do not reach past you. Why is that so hard to get?

    • alur

      I don’t want to hear any carping from people who support the BO healthcare shame while YOUR elected democrats in congress opt out of the OBummer healthcare as well as the unions (of which I am a member).

      If the chef won’t eat his or her own food, I wouldn’t eat at the restaurant.

      • NYBondLady

        Ha, love this! Now unfortunately for you (I don’t have much support on this issue here), I am going to up-vote you.

      • NYBondLady

        Wow, I feel pretty awesome to get down-votes no matter what I say. And I’d like whoever DV’d Alur to say exactly why.

      • alur

        Thanks. I’m one of those social very-liberals, fiscal very-conservatives. I’m a gay-rights advocate and freedom-from religion guy. On the other hand, I’m for honesty, paying your bills,and not spending more than your earn. We can have our cake an eat it too. Just watch spending our tax dollars or we’ll lose everything to China who cares nothing about minorities, women, or civil rights.

    • gega
    • Amanda

      This is already a thing. My husband works for a Catholic hospital, and NO contraception is covered by our health insurance. Infuriating.