• Fri, Jul 12 - 5:00 pm ET

Exactly When Did We Become Terrified Of Letting Our Kids Go Outside?

Are we terrified of letting our kids go outside? I don’t know – I have an infant and a toddler and I love taking them outdoors. I’m just assuming that we must be because I saw the most amazing permission slip, ever, today. Something had to inspire this nonsense, so I’m going out on a limb and concluding that some parents are terrified of nature:

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Maybe a kid came home from school dirty one day and all hell broke loose? What could possibly have motivated an educator to make a permission slip like this? Part of me hopes that this person just has an amazing sense of humor and was messing with all of the parents.

Something tells me I am giving the general public too much credit here, though. In the time of helicopter parenting and law suits, who knows the lengths that schools need to go to cover their asses. And since we’re on the topic of asses – a lot of kids don’t even get their asses outside of the house anymore. Between “stranger-danger” paranoia and TV and social media addictions, mud may in fact be a foreign object to a lot of families.

I have to admit – I laughed at first, but it kind of makes me sad now. Maybe I just take any opportunity to wax poetic about the past – but life is so different for kids now. I remember leaving the house in the afternoon and running around the neighborhood until the sun began to set. This behavior started when I was about 6-years-old. All the kids in the neighborhood did it. Does that happen anymore? It certainly wasn’t happening in Brooklyn. Maybe things will be different in the suburban town where we’ve relocated.

My kids are still young, but I hope going outside and touching mud and bugs never becomes an activity that needs to have a permission slip attached to it.

(photo: Reddit)

You can reach this post's author, Maria Guido, on twitter.
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  • keelhaulrose

    I love letting my girls out to play.
    But we’ve been kept from the backyard this year because of the mosquitoes. All day, everywhere, even with bug spray. They’ve been swarming around the car… It’s like the scene in the Birds. I’d suck it up, but they give my daughter welts.

    • Annie

      That sucks!

      I’m almost translucently pale and mosquitoes love me, so anything outdoorsy involves a lot of spray. Here’s what Consumer Report suggests: Off Deep Woods Sportsmen II, Cutter Backwoods Unscented, Off Family Care Smooth & Dry, 3M Ultrathon (all with deet); Repel Plant Based Lemon Eucalyptus; or Natrapel 8-Hour with picaridin.

      PROTIP: The lemon eucalyptus repeals more than mosquitoes, I’m able to be in chiggers, tick-infested woods, around fleas, whatever and they don’t bother me.

    • keelhaulrose

      Thank you, I’ll be trying some of these. I’m desperate. I went to get a handful of cilantro from my garden and a tomato and I got fifteen bites. I was outside for just over a minute!

    • Blueathena623

      I soooooooo feel you. I am sitting here contemplating whether or not I want my kid and I to brave the outdoors. We’ve had insane weather in my part of the woods, and the Mosquitos are nasty. Its like nothing touches them. I can spray us silly with stuff that is 25% DEET, and the Mosquitos just laugh at it.

  • Wendy

    Uggggh, I’m sure it’s legit but just to keep parents from complaining, not so much fear of lawsuits over it. I’m a teacher (to be fair, I complain at home when my kid comes home filthy from daycare, but I don’t bring those complaints back to daycare). I have heard plenty of ridiculous and petty complaints from parents, though, especially over field trips. My favorite was when I gave a fair-skinned girl sunblock on a zoo field trip on one of the hottest days of the year and she got burned anyway. The mother yelled at me and one of my coworkers because the girl apparently only burns if she WEARS sunblock, not when she doesn’t. It was totally my fault for being so ignorant as not to know this basic rule of sunblock usage for fair-skinned children. I wish I was making this up.

    • Annie

      How… But UVR… Wha?

    • http://www.facebook.com/RetiredSceneQueen Emmali Lucia

      Is she allergic to Zinc or something? Because you’d think that would be in the file…

    • Wendy

      I don’t think so. The first I heard of it was when she was yelling at me about it. I gave her some because her mother didn’t send her with any…so I assumed she’d forgotten. If she was allergic to some ingredient she should have found a replacement brand or something…. I have learned that you never know which thing is going to tick a parent off, and it’s almost always a total surprise.

    • Aldonza

      I feel you. I’m a teaching artist and we’re in the midst of different art camps and it’s amazing how detailed we’ve had to start getting. Most parents are cool, but all it takes is a few who get pissy and loud with you that the studio has to start covering their ass.

    • Wendy

      :)

    • Fiona

      I teach summer school. I just got a nasty mail because one of my students, nine years old, put her towel and wet bathing suit in her backpack wet! I guess she wanted me to find a plastic bag to put it in. The inside of the backpack was a little damp. My bad.

    • Wendy

      Like you have 30 bags (or however many students you have) waiting around for each kid. 9 is plenty old enough for her to send a bag along in the backpack and tell the kid what she wanted done. Grrrrr!

  • Shelly Lloyd

    As a scout leader, the stories I could tell about helicopter parents and the great out doors…we could be here all night if I did.

    • Roberta

      “Yeah, my child is afraid of bugs, so you need to watch out for bugs and keep them away from her”- actual words from a parent in the day care I work in.

    • Paul White

      baahahahahahaha

  • Sara610

    I remember, one day in elementary school, I wore a fancy outfit (don’t remember what the occasion was) and my mom told me, before I caught the bus, that I had to be extra-careful and not do any super-messy activities. I wasn’t careful, and I came home with grass stains and holes in my brand-new white tights and scuffs on my brand-new patent-leather shoes, and yes, my mom was upset. But you know who got in trouble? Me, for not being careful after she told me to be. I don’t think it ever would have occurred to my parents to get mad at my SCHOOL because I got my clothes dirty. Especially since, you know, I was eight and OF COURSE I was going to get my clothes dirty.

    • Annie

      Yeah, I think it depends on what grade it is. Kindergarten or something, if they let the kids out to recess on a super muddy day and they’re wearing school picture clothes, I’d be pissed. Any grade after that, I’m packing a plastic bag full of play clothes for them to change into.

      IT’S SO COMPLICATED U GUYZ! ;)

    • Sara610

      Sure, I get that……but on the typical day, like you say, parents should send their kids to school assuming that they’re going to get messy.

  • Blueathena623

    In regards to not going outside — did you know the cases of rickets is increasing? Rickets!

    • Annie

      Yeah… It really speaks for itself.

  • Annie

    Special Snowflake children really ought to be home schooled.

    • Guest

      I’m gonna have to step in here an say something. My kids are home schooled and we LOVE being outdoors, mud and dirt being the best part. And we all burn and get bit up, but that’s what sunscreen and bug spray are for! Also, I only buy my kids clothes at thrift stores (or get hand-me-downs) so when -not if- they get dirt/mud/grass/chalk/paint stains on them, I don’t care. I’d say that if my kids were in public school they’d get much LESS outside time.

    • Annie

      I’m not dogging home school kids, it’s just obvious that parents like the ones who preempted the ridiculous permission slip aren’t ready to let their yoonique special snowflakes out into the world yet. Best to keep them inside the anemone.

    • Erica

      That’s how I took your comment, Annie.

    • Wendy

      You are awesome!

  • Rachel Sea

    As far as I am concerned, it is school and daycare’s job to make sure kids get filthy. If they are clean, they are spending too much time inactive.

    • Andrea

      My grandma used to say: “A happy kid is a dirty kid”. It was her way of saying that kids need to play to be happy and the best play is outside exploring, jumping, running, falling, climbing, etc..all getting dirty.

  • CrushLily

    I was out walking with my two year old the other day and I saw a group of five kids about six years old running down the street completely unaccompanied. My first thought was, ‘there are other kids in the neighbourhood?’ I’ve lived here for four years.

    • http://twitter.com/mariaguido Maria Guido

      Isn’t that crazy?

    • Véronique Houde

      I totally know what you mean! I live in a condo development where most people are a lot older, and we now have a baby. People keep commenting on how great it is to have kids on the street, and I keep pointing to the apartments where I know that there are kids and they are all stunned! I am the only one who lets my child crawl on the grass. It’s strange really… We have this beautiful lawn that only the dogs use (and the owners pick up the poop so that’s not even an excuse)!

  • Paul White

    I was born in a suburb of Houston, and there was a bayou across from my house. As a kid, I spent more hours there looking for snakes, bugs, fish, etc.

    When I was in 5th grade, we moved to rural Co.

    I spend time looking for snakes, weird bugs, mammals, birds, frogs, rocks…you name it. I also did weight lifting and Boy Scouts. I was rarely totally clean, usually bruised, and well, yeah, that was what life was like.

    WTF is with people afraid of a little dirt, mud, and blood?

    • Guest

      Yes, blood! Usually on one of the first warm days of spring one of my kids will get a scrape and cry and I’ll say, “Better get used to that, summer’s coming!” Nothin’ wrong with bumps and bruises if they’re a sign of a fun day spent outdoors.

  • Amber

    I’m going to have to be that parent and disagree with everybody else on here. The time I picked my son up from school and he was covered in mud, I was pissed. I don’t expect him to be rolling around in mud while at school. That’s not why I send him there.

    I guess I’m weird.

    • Kat

      I’ve tried to get on board with where you’re coming from but while I can understand being annoyed at the extra work involved in cleaning his clothes, I just cant quite imagine actually being pissed at the school. Maybe at my son, once he’s old enough to fathom that spending a bunch of the day in muddy clothes is pretty inconvenient for everyone, but my kids can get get covered in mud in less than two minutes and I don’t send them to school expecting them to be individually monitored constantly so I don’t think I’d have any basis to be pissed at them.

    • Amber

      We have different expectations. If there is a mud pit on the playground, I expect the people hired to monitor them during recess to keep the kids out of it, not start an impromptu woodstoock.

    • Amber

      We have different expectations. If there is a mud pit on the playground, I expect the people hired to monitor them during recess to keep the kids out of it, not start an impromptu woodstoock.

    • Roberta

      I have worked at a day care for the past 3 summers. Those kids that don’t have any dirt on them? They spend the entire day at the table when we go outside, playing cards and complaining that they are bored. The same applies at school during recess, when that dirt means your son went out and ran like mad, played games, and was active, rather than sitting down and doing nothing.

    • Amber

      You can run around and play outside without being covered in mud.

    • Amber

      You can run around and play outside without being covered in mud.

    • Sara610

      But you know that he has recess, right? And that the kids go outside during recess? Unless your son is a preschooler, in which case he may still need reminders, he’s old enough to realize (if you tell him and reinforce it with consequences) that you expect him not to roll around in the mud. If he disobeys that rule, it’s on your son, not the school. I agree that rolling around in mud isn’t cool, but again–that’s not the school’s fault, it’s your son’s unless the teacher led an “everyone roll in the mud!” activity with all the kids. The day I thought it would be fun to stand in the sprinkler during recess, so I got soaking wet and my mom had to leave work to bring a dry change of clothes for the afternoon….sure, she was pissed and I don’t blame her. But again, it wasn’t the school’s fault, and she didn’t blame the school.

    • Amber

      The teacher did lead it.

      I send my son to school for lots of reasons, rolling around in the mud is not one of them.

    • Sara610

      In that case, this situation is so different from the original topic of discussion that it almost seems out of place in this discussion. This was a case of a teacher making an irresponsible choice, not a kid getting dirty in the case of normal kid activities.

    • Amber

      The teacher did lead it.

      I send my son to school for lots of reasons, rolling around in the mud is not one of them.

    • Tusconian

      How old is your kid? Because I can’t imagine a boy older than 9 or 10 rolling in the mud on purpose. Pretty much all schools I know allow at least 15 minute recess for kids under 6th grade, and allow PE classes outdoors in good weather for all grade levels. I had recess until 8th grade, and in high school we were allowed to have “study hall” in the garden if the weather was nice, which involved a lot of sitting on the grass. In preschool and kindergarten we’d be allowed to play outside all afternoon, and went on trips to playgrounds and nature preserves. No, you don’t send him to school specifically for him to get dirty, but unless the teacher cancelled math class to send the kids out into the rain and mud, it doesn’t sound like the school did anything wrong. Young kids need fresh air and active playtime.

    • Amber

      He was in third grade. A sprinkler was broken and the teacher encouraged 30 kids to play in the mud at lunch recess and then track it back into the classrooms.

      As much as you all give me shit for it, the principal and the janitor were also pissed. Kids shouldn’t be rolling it mud in school. I don’t believe you all would be thrilled to pick up your children covered in mud. Sorry, not buying it.

    • lin

      That particular situation doesn’t really have much to do with this conversation. Kids get dirty. They should, A teacher encouraging them to play in actual mud is a totally different thing.
      I let my daycare kids play in mud, water, dirt – whatever they want. Parents send a change of clothes and have a choice of switching daycares if they don’t like my rules. Schools are different, I don’t think a child shoukd come back to class covered in mud either. Dirt from the playground, yes.

    • Erica

      That is a different situation that the topic of discussion. A hike in the woods around the school and the kid accidentally steps into a muddy hole is another thing.

    • Tusconian

      Honestly, I’m still skeptical. Did the teacher say specifically “yes, everyone go roll in that mud hole and get as dirty as possible,” or did she say “yes, you can still play in that area of the playground even though it’s muddy” while not taking into consideration that a bunch of 8 year olds will take that as a challenge? All 30 of the children completely rolled in the mud?

      And I don’t think anyone is criticizing your not wanting your kid caked in mud, but the comment “that’s not why I send him to school.” Well, no, it isn’t, but assuming you send your kid to school to learn 3rd grade level academic subjects, a LOT of things go on at school every day that aren’t your particular reason for sending him. There are gaps of non-academic time in the school day, where the teacher might let the kids play with toys or read picture books, where a substitute hands out low-level busy work and puts on a barely academic video, where your kid might overhear naughty or age inappropriate conversation in the lunch room, where your kid will have age-appropriate but not school related conversations, etc. I knew a lot of parents who didn’t like the idea of field trips that weren’t directly related to a subject that was being studied, or objected to a particular class. Those parents didn’t send their kids to school to learn about Sex Ed or DARE, but they learned it anyway. You don’t send your kid to school to eat candy/pizza and play games, but there are likely a handful of days where a couple of subjects are canceled for a holiday party or a reward pizza party.

    • Amber

      He was in third grade. A sprinkler was broken and the teacher encouraged 30 kids to play in the mud at lunch recess and then track it back into the classrooms.

      As much as you all give me shit for it, the principal and the janitor were also pissed. Kids shouldn’t be rolling it mud in school. I don’t believe you all would be thrilled to pick up your children covered in mud. Sorry, not buying it.

    • Justme

      There are two scenarios going on here:
      - A independent decision by a child to roll in the mud during recess.
      - A teacher led romp through the mud.
      Given the information you provided in your original statement, most people are going to assume it was an example of the first scenario because the second scenario is obviously NOT what the original article is referencing.

      There is a difference between active kids playing outside and coming home with dirt on their shoes or a grass-stain on their jeans and a deliberate, teacher initiated muck fest.

      I think the average person would agree that the second scenario would be cause for concern, but your original statement did not provide people that information, thus causing them to initially disagree with you.

    • Kay

      Why? You never heard of a washing machine?

    • Madame Ovaries

      This is actually the only argument I think you can make for the permission slip not being ridiculous: maybe the teacher/daycare was trying to give parents a heads up that kids shouldn’t wear their nicest duds on a particular day. Teachers used to do something similar when I was in school if we were using paints or something messy. However, I also used to be sent to school under the assumptions that 1. sometimes learning happens outside because we aren’t vampire children, and 2. depending on my age, it was my responsibility to not come home looking a mess. The reason that this note says so much about modern parents is that it seems to imply that those two commonsense assumptions aren’t assumed anymore.

  • AStewart

    I’m 22 now, but as a child I was never even allowed to play at the other end of the street (where most of the other kids lived – surely safer?). The one time a friend came to see me and we went to the park around the corner unsupervised my Dad started running around the path between the two because he thought I’d been abducted (I got a huge telling off and gave up after that point). I wasn’t even allowed to walk home from school until I was 14, even though practically everyone did and I could have walked most if not all the way with others.
    It wasn’t really about the dirt etc. (I did Brownies, Scouts and Explorers), but I wasn’t even encouraged to play in the garden or have friends round or visit friends.

    Don’t do that to your kids, there’s so much I missed out on that I can’t make up for as an adult. I don’t know where my parents’ fear came from (it was never discussed), but I was a feeble chubby cry-baby with few friends and low confidence – the trade-off is not worth it!
    (I’m now healthy, succesful and fairly active, but I would say it’s had an effect as I still never leave the house unless I have to – my brain is programmed that I come home from work and don’t leave again until work the next day)

    • Andrea

      I’m pretty free range as a parent and I do let my 10 and 13 year old outside by themselves, but do you know what my fear is? Not that they will get dirty, not that they will get kidnapped, but that another parents is gonna see my children playing out in the front yard or biking through the neighborhood and they will call CPS on me for letting them run around unsupervised.

    • AStewart

      I think it’s really sad that you feel that way :( you’re setting a good example and your kids will thank you, though. High five!

    • Andrea

      Yeah it’s sad! It hasn’t happened of course, and I’d like to think that CPS has better things to do than investigate a call like that, but I can’t help it. We live in paranoid times. Not gonna let that ruin my children’s childhood though.

  • Véronique Houde

    I wonder… Why is it that, in our generation, we have a tendency of blaming the adults around our children for whatever might be wrong? i read an article the other day from a mom who was angry that her son’s school dare giving him a good talking to because he pulled a fire alarm when he was 6 and then when he was 16 built a long-range pair of scissors that could be used as a weapon. She said it was the adults’ fault because, what can you expect from a 6 year old when there’s a big red sign at their height that says “pull” on it? And what can you expect from a 16 year old with no impulse control when the teacher “dares” to come late to class, and you put tape and scissors in front of a kid to “taunt” them?

    In this case, if a kid gets dirty, it HAS to be the teachers’ fault, because it’s the adults’ responsibility to control the children the entire time that they’re at school, but if they control them in a way that the parent disagrees, how dare they?

    I think it comes down to the fact that, even as parents, we put so much pressure on ourselves to raise the “perfect and perfectly happy” kids, that we transfer that responsibility to everyone and anyone around us too. We forget that children will make their own choices and will grow up in their own ways whether you like it or not. We forget that they have agency and freewill to a certain extent. We forget to raise them to respect others, and to follow authority.

    I know that there are a lot of parents that are NOT like this (they tend to hang out here ;)) and thank god for that.

    • Tusconian

      Bwuh? Parents like that can’t be convinced that their kid isn’t just an intuitive, creative, boisterous but sweet little angel until they do something that lands them in actual major trouble. And even then would be up there saying “MY perfect son is being personally victimized by the police/teachers/naughty trampy teenage girls/bullies/the neighbors/whoever for no good reason!”

    • Véronique Houde

      Totally. just like that woman in the article. It’s everyone else’s fault that her son acted badly, they tempted him and shouldn’t have. He’s just a child ;). Dude, I’ve agreed with you on everything since at least last week. It’s a record!

    • Justme

      I think there is also the fact that parents don’t want to take responsibility for the fact that maybe they weren’t that great of a parent and that’s why their child is awful at school. I think in MOST cases that the way children behave is a direct result of the expectations at home and the consequences (or lack thereof) for misbehavior. So if someone calls attention to the fact that little Johnny is a rude, disrespectful little shit at school, Mommy and Daddy feel personally attacked and immediately go on the defensive like their parenting methods are being questioned. But in most cases…the most defensive parents are the most guilty of enabling their child’s bad behavior.

      And yes, this has nothing to do with the story, but instead with your comment.

    • Wendy

      Awesome.

  • Ellcharmo

    These ridiculous permission slips come from ridiculous parental complaints. Ugh. Parents don’t want their little precious to get dirty. “Why is little JOhnny all wet on this rainy day?? I DEMAND RETRIBUTION!!”
    Parents are getting more ridiculous. Schools are having to accommodate.

  • mckenziesmommy

    I would have a problem if they took my child out in rain and they got soaked…

    • Amber

      So would most of the parents commenting, even though they pretend they would just love to pull up to the school and pick up their children covered in mud.

      It’s easy to talk about how fun it is on the internet when you aren’t actually scrubbing filth out of your car.

    • Sara610

      You’re pretty drastically misinterpreting what everyone else is saying, either on purpose or because your reading comprehension skills need work.

      Granted, it sounds like the teacher literally did lead the kids to play in the mud. That was a poor choice, and I would probably be annoyed too.
      But that’s a pretty rare occurrence; the original permission slip that started the discussion and what most of us are talking about is normal, everyday getting-dirty that kids do when they’re playing outside. That’s clearly very different than what happened with your son. Do you not see how?

      And no one is pretending that they “love” to pick up their children covered in mud. We are, however, saying that kids play outside and get dirty, and that’s not something to get all pissy at the school about. Again, your situation is obviously different.

    • Amber

      I’m intentionally misinterpreting everyone? Really? Four people respond to my statement that I was upset about my child being covered in mud at school with crap about how kids need to be allowed to play outside and I have a problem with reading comprehension?

      That’s laughable.

    • Sara610

      Your original statement left out the fact that the teacher actually led the children in rolling in the mud. That’s a major factor to omit, and changes the story significantly. Obviously, a teacher leading kids in a romp in the mud is very different than kids playing outside during recess and getting dirty in the process. Do you really not see the difference?

    • lin

      Totally picking a fight where there isn’t one. You’ve completely misunderstood this entire post and the resonses.

    • Sara610

      Sure, I think most people would. But that’s pretty different than what we’re talking about here. Taking a class full of kids out in the rain without appropriate clothing? Not okay. Having kids go outside and realizing that they’ll come into contact with nature and might get dirty in the process? Common sense.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/valerisexton.jones Valeri Jones

    Not trying to play the devil’s advocate here, but when I was in elementary school, we went on a field trip to a natural history park. Our activities included touring some caves and having a picnic outdoors. Upon said picnic, we found a stream that the teachers let us play in. Two girls slipped repeatedly on some slimy rocks. One broke their wrist and the other fractured her knee cap. Fortunately for the school, the parents didn’t hold them responsible. I’m just saying that I guess the school feels responsible for letting the parents know exactly what may happen while their kids are on a field trip as a way of covering their butts in case a child gets hurt.

  • Toaster

    My neighborhood is swarming with children and I find that so exciting! I come from a much larger city and you’d never see kids playing by themselves, but in the burbs in my current smaller city it seems really common.

    According to Internet mom forums I’m already a bad parent for letting my almost-3-year-old play by himself in the back yard for short periods of time while I do something like sit on the back stoop and feed the baby. I’m honestly baffled by parents who say their kids won’t be allowed outside until their teens.

    • Charles

      I let my kids play outside I our yard when they were around three with siblings. I check in, kept a pretty good eye but never hover. Kids play differently alone. My neighbor told a cop driving by my three year old was outside (with 8 and 10 year old sisters) alone. He laughed at her. He basically told her to MYOB, it was a safe neighborhood and that is was childhood is all about, playing. Funny,my son is now in college and her son is under house arrest.

  • Natalie

    So they are making parents aware that the kids might get dirty. So what? They are just saying make sure that they send their kids to school in clothing and shoes that can get dirty or ruined. For some people there is such a thing as school clothing and play clothing. And if your kids are allergic to some kinds of plants it might be nice if they knew they might have contact with them. What is the big deal? Damn there are some hateful people commenting geezzzz

  • Blahblah

    I found the first part about dirty shoes weird. Like, isn’t that what shoes are for? If you’re wandering around in the wood, I kind of hope your shoes ARE dirty. If I’ve been warned that my kid is going on a field trip outdoors, I feel like it’s my job to dress them appropriately for that, not the school’s job to make sure they stay pristine.

    I was always surprised at the kids who said their parents got mad if their pants were dirty. Clothes are washable? That’s the point, isn’t it? Also, people are washable. My kid comes home from a field trip full of new experiences and dirt, they can take a nice shower and tell me about it after a change of clothes.

  • MoD

    I grew up in a super small town in the middle of nowhere. From a very young age – like, three years old – we would play outside unsupervised. Until I was five, we lived in a trailer park that was teeming with young children. We were like a pack of dogs, running around and playing in the fields behind the trailer park. Good times. We’d swarm one home or another for refreshments and be out until dark. It was a great community and I have awesome memories of warm summer evenings, running amok with other kids.

    I live in a huge city now, and it sort of makes me sad my son won’t have anything like this. There’s just no way he could safely go outside and play unsupervised in a metro area of 2 million+. Besides the whole “parenting has changed” (which my Mom brings up every five minutes), I’m not in a community where I know the other families and can trust people have my child’s best interests in mind. However, I fully expect my son to get outdoors as much as possible, with me or my husband. It’s an integral part of childhood.

    Is part of the “omg my kid’s clothes are dirty” attitude have something to do with how some people treat their kids like a mini fashion accessory? I expect my kid to get dirty once in awhile when he’s with his sitter. I gave her extra clothes to keep at her house for that exact reason. She takes him all over the place. The other day she took him and her own kids to the swim park and plunked him in the water in his onesie. Had him changed and dry by the time I picked him up.

  • SDA

    I worked in daycare so I believe it. I mean parents would get upset if their 2 year old had a little dirt on their knee, the kid is 2, they can barely walk upright. However, I think this might be good. Parents see their children as going to school and sitting in desks and not out playing and potentially getting dirty, this is a good reminder of what can happen and to have them dress accordingly or bring a change of clothes/shoes to go outside if they prefer. The reminder that they will see birds and bugs is kind of odd.