• Mon, Apr 15 2013

Adam Lanza Was Bullied So Badly At Sandy Hook That His Now Murdered Mom Considered Suing The School

bullyingSome months after the Newtown tragedies, authorities are still piecing together why 20-year-old Adam Lanza took the lives of 27 people, including his own mother. But a peek into his own childhood reveals some very distressing experiences at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Ones that his own mother was reportedly “irate” with — and for good reason.

New York Daily News reports that Nancy Lanza, Adam’s mother, was very angry with Sandy Hook Elementary when her son attended the school as a boy. Adam was reportedly subjected to harsh bullying. So much so that Nancy was considering suing Sandy Hook for turning a “blind eye to beatings from his classmates.” And beatings there were, according to a family relative:

“Nancy felt fiercely protective of him,” the relative said. “She was convinced the school wasn’t doing enough to protect Adam. It made her irate…Adam would come home with bruises all over his body,” the relative said. “His mom would ask him what was wrong, and he wouldn’t say anything. He would just sit there…She was trying to get proof. She wanted to know where the bruises were coming from.”

Nancy moved her son to a new school after the sixth grade. But said relative maintains that something really negative really took hold of Adam during those formative years. From then on, he remained “a sick boy.” And then some, I’d say.

(photo: f8grapher / Shutterstock)

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  • whiteroses

    It doesn’t excuse what he did, though. None of the children he killed were the ones who bullied him. Nobody deserves to die for bullying, because people can and do change. What we need is education.

    It’s clear he was a sick, sick individual and needed some serious psychiatric help.

  • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

    You know… the thing about it is that most criminals have a history of being mistreated themselves. And the fact of the matter is that we as adults and a community fail them in a certain way. Our society spends a lot more time thinking of ways to gain justice and punishing the criminals. Imagine if all of the money that is spent on the carceral system and lawyers and fighting crime was invested in mental health services, prevention, after-school programs, better teacher salaries, school counsellors, coaching, parenting support services, etc. perhaps there would be far less criminals and severe mental health issues out there.

    I used to work in a teenage youth carceral unit. Quebec has one of the highest quality systems for youth offenders in the world, which is based on rehabilitation instead of on punishment. I had been advised, and decided to follow one rule: when I came into a unit for the first times, I refused to look up the teenagers’ crimes. I wanted to get to know them as teenagers instead of as criminals. And you know what? When you gave these teens the opportunity to just be themselves without their history attached to their identity, they became pretty cool kids! And most of them were hell bent on making it out better than they were when they came in. I remember this one time where they got out of line and were not allowed to attend their classes that day and how pissed off they became at night at us educators. I looked at them and I said “do you realize the significance of the fact that no one is complaining of having TV revoked or soccer taken away? that you guys are yelling at us because we didn’t let you go to french class? I want you to remember this, and take this as an opportunity to realize how important school really is to you guys at the end of the day!”

    Just something to think about…

    • Rachel Sea

      Most of the people in US prisons are in for crimes whose recidivism rates are directly tied to whether the perpetrators receive counseling. If California did away with the death penalty, we would be able to afford rehab for 100 inmates a year. If those 100 inmates were in rehab instead of prison, we could afford rehab for another 50, and so on. Punitive incarceration makes sense for criminals who pose a continual danger to society, but we’d all be safer if we just took steps to prevent people from becoming criminals.

    • Tinyfaeri

      This isn’t a kid who knocked over a convenience store and is sorry now. It’s an adult who made a conscious choice to walk into an elementary school he hadn’t attended in almost a decade and open fire on children who weren’t even alive when he was there. I don’t care how horrible his past was – there is no excusing what he did, no explaining what he did, and even if he had lived no amount of rehabilitation that would have “fixed” him. It’s comparing apples and buried landmines.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      what i’m saying is that we need to invest BEFORE things like this happen, when our kids are young. Before bullying, parental neglect, abuse and development of mental illness can take away so much from these people that they choose to commit horrendous crimes. Put away your feeling of wanting revenge for a second. It’s not by locking up a guy for his crime that you’re going to stop another one from committing something worse. And that my friend is the whole point.

    • Tinyfaeri

      I’m not talking about crime, even horrendous ones – this went beyond that as all mass shootings do. Comparing this criminal (who is dead, so what revenge am I supposed to want?) to your average juvenile in detention is comparing apples to a landmine even if that kid killed someone. An apple, even if it has a worm in it, can still be useful once the worm is removed – it can still do good things with help. A landmine will kill you unless it’s safely detonated or made so it will never function again. There is a massive difference between what you’re talking about and Adam Lanza. Someone who will kill 20 children and 7 adults without blinking is not someone who can be helped, before, during or after the act. Millions of people are abused in all sorts of awful ways every year, month, week, day, hour and second – 99.999999% of them do not do what he did.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      But imagine for a second that there was more money put into place to fight against bullying, to help parents out with their kids, better quality and accessibility to mental health services for youth (see “i am adam lanza’s mother” for example), better pay for teachers and support staff in schools. Would Adam Lanza have become a landmine? How does a kid go from simple “bad apple” to said landmine? How can we as a community make changes to make sure that we can help other kids NOT turn out the way Adam did? This is what I’m talking about.

      Clearly, Lanza’s mom made many mistakes and we can all say that she was a crap mom. She’s dead now though, so she can’t step in and explain what she did and didn’t do for her child. This article points out though that she was struggling, she did ask for help, she did try to make her son’s life better, but that specific change she tried to make, by suing the school, didn’t work. What else happened?

      What if we DIDN’T wait for tragedies such as this mass shooting, and such as kids committing suicide after being bullied with no one able or willing to help them out, to step in and make changes? What I see happening here, is that Adam’s crime is SO atrocious, that people are having a hard time looking at our society and how we can make it better, because clearly he’s a nut job and it’s purely his fault that this happened.

      I’m not blaming anyone, yet I am blaming everyone. When one member of society fails, I think we all fail in a way. Let’s take this time and talk about ways to improve our society instead of seeking scapegoats for the radically horrible things that go wrong.

    • Tinyfaeri

      The only one who deserves blame for what happened at Sandy Hook is Adam Lanza.

    • Jessie

      I don’t agree. The culture where “kids will be kids” and “MY child would NEVER hurt someone else,” is what is partially to blame for this tragedy. Too many people not taking to responsibility. And you are correct, not everyone abused turns out to be a mass murderer. But if someone would have taken Mrs. Lanza seriously when Adam was being bullied and beaten in freaking elementary school, perhaps the future could have been changed. Maybe if we taught our children to be kind to others instead of just saying “boys will be boys” or “girls will be girls” we can stop some violence. And that includes what happened in Stuebenville.

    • torako

      i’m not sure i understand what the argument is. let’s pretend for a moment that your nonsense claim that psychopaths are born, not made, is true… even though it isn’t. (there’s a reason doctors don’t diagnose personality disorders in children.) are you trying to argue that because you have decided that it is futile to attempt to prevent crimes, we shouldn’t try? what’s the worst that could happen? as far as i can tell, the worst possible outcome of improving mental healthcare in the US is that there will still be mass-shootings, but less children and teenagers will commit suicide and in 10-20 years there will be significantly fewer homeless people on the corner arguing with nothing. if your choices are between that and things continuing as they are now, i think the choice is clear. or are you just terrified that efforts to help people will have the awful side-effect of helping different people?

    • Gangle

      Thank you thank you thank you. I could just…. KISS YOU right now. This, exactly this.

    • Gangle

      Yes! Just, yes! I could just kiss you right now! Just all of this! Thank you.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      I think she just wants to continue being pissed off at lanza without actually having to think about issues surrounding the shooting ;). But awesome comments dude! Thanks for taking my arguments and making them better.

    • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ wmdkitty

      Uh, actually, most psychopaths *are* “born wrong”, and display very disturbing behaviors as children.

      That’s not to say they can’t be “made” under very extreme circumstances.

    • jack_sprat2

      Almost always after having been horribly mistreated by someone with authority over them. Now, sociopaths may be another thing altogether, but most of them stay between the lines, more or less, for a lifetime, being only concerned with No. 1.

    • jack_sprat2

      Send some money to an Al Qaeda front group, then use that argument in your defense after Homeland Security breaks down your door and hauls your ass away.

    • hursta1

      You are an uneducated moron. To say that we cant prevent mentally unstable people from blowing people away is stupid. This country has failed its mentally handicapped since its inception. Until we get serious and start to embrace the ideas the OP put forth then this will continue to happen. People like you just aid in the cycle by denying that they could be helped. Go take a class and quit reading BS on the internet.

    • jack_sprat2

      True, Adam Lanza WAS a “land mine”, but you’re evading Veronique’s point, which is that others were responsible for building and priming him. Stop the bomb makers. Defuse the bombs.

    • chickadee

      But this guy isnt, I think, the product of his environment or necessarily of abuse. He seems to have had deeper and far more difficult issues that may certainly have not been helped by the fact that he might have been bullied, but most victims of bullying seem to become self-destructive and look to suicide.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      That’s not necessarily true, chickadee. Did you know that most bullies have been bullied in the past?

    • chickadee

      Yes, I do know that, but what I am saying is that it is pretty unlikely that the bullying caused the massacre. I’d be surprised if it was a major factor in this case.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      I don’t know what it is about what I said that made you conclude that I have said that bullying caused Adam Lanza to kill 27 people. I wasn’t even talking about Adam Lanza specifically, but merely reflecting on what we can do as a society to help prevent people from committing heinous crimes because of past mistreatments and wounds. Please re-read my post, and you will see that it’s not only about bullying!

    • chickadee

      I did read your comments, and they perhaps shouldn’t be on a comments section for the Lanza case if you don’t mean to imply that bullying was a cause of the shooting.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      Articles such as these are trampolines meant to discuss issues that are relevant to our current times – not to just discuss cases specifically. They are meant to have people reflect on themes, and debate constructively in order to form educated opinions with which they can influence the world around them. It’s great to bitch about how evil Adam Lanza is, but even more productive to use this article to get out of the bubble and try to make the world a better place. And I’m sure that many people would agree with me, seeing that I have no down votes and only ups.

    • Tinyfaeri

      Considering the post is all about Adam Lanza and how he was bullied at Sandy Hook with no other bullying stats or mention of other kids who were bullied, or a pattern anywhere, and just about what one of Lanza’s relatives said about him and his mother, it’s not really a trampoline for anything. It’s just giving more air time to a psycho who killed a bunch of kids and destroyed a bunch of lives.
      I agree with chickadee. Your comments, while not inaccurate, do not necessarily belong on a post entirely about a monster who has nothing to do with your points – it’s cause-jacking. Lanza is not a good starting point for talking about how we need to rethink Juvie – that’s like using a story about a serial killer to start talking about how to rehab pickpockets.

    • Cancan

      You calling Adam Lanza a monster proves the OP’s point.

    • Gangle

      Lanza was a sick, disturbed, broken and damaged boy. He wasn’t a monster, though. His acts most certainly were monstrous, but they didn’t happen in a vacuum… he didn’t just come up with the idea to murder innocents out of nowhere. Those ideas were born in a mind that was broken, and left untreated and unrecognised. ‘Monster’ implies that you just think he was born inherently evil.

    • Tinyfaeri

      Actually, I do. Some people are just bad people. It doesn’t matter if they have loving parents, abusive parents, or parents who are neither here nor there. It doesn’t matter if they get bullied or are ignored or are the captain of the football team. It doesn’t matter if they have money or no money or are somewhere in the middle. They will do horrible things, one way or another, and there is no fixing them. They make up a tiny, tiny fraction of a percent of the population, and they are our serial killers, our mass shooters, our genocidal dictators, our sadists, our psychopaths. There is no preventing them, or catching them at an early age before they are turned bad.
      Is that everyone who does bad things? Of course not, they’re a tiny fraction of a percent of the billions of people we have on this world, and most people can be rehabilitated and helped to be functioning and even thriving members of society. But people like Gacy, Dahmer, Lanza, McVey, bin Laden, and Hitler cannot. be. fixed. All the mental healthcare in the world couldn’t make them not be who they are, and bullying or abuse cannot be blamed for what they did, not in any significant kind of way. There is something else there that made them go the direction they went instead of being like the millions of other victims of abuse who do not kill, mutilate, destroy or attempt genocide. Like I said, apples and landmines.

    • Gangle

      Ok so you believe in a made up construct about good and evil. Lets agree to disagree. I will agree that no, people like Lanza and Gacy probably cannot be rehabilitated, at least, not with our knowledge right now. Perhaps we never can. I do think we can spot them early and possibly prevent them from becoming this deranged, or at the very least remove them from society before they cause harm. There are always signs. I can’t think of a single serial killer who had a normal childhood and normal physical and/or mental health. Usually there is extreme abuse early on, usually coupled with neurological and psychological problems that go untreated.
      Perhaps we can prevent some of these people progressing to the point of no return. If we can’t, then certainly we can remove them from the general public and place them in care before they commit such crimes. Society is at least partially responsible for the people in it, for the people it creates.

      Gacy, an example of yours, certainly didn’t come from nowhere. He grew up in a home where his alcoholic father emotionally and physically abused him, often without provocation. His mother allowed it. He was constantly hospitalised for seizures and blackouts. The doctors never tried to get to the bottom of it, never asked enough questions. When the seizures stopped, they would just send him home. They never picked up on the unusual amount of time he spent in hospital, compared to other boys. He was sexually abused regularly by a family friend. Throughout his early years he displayed worrying behaviour that never got picked up on, never got diagnosed. The people who were meant to watch over and protect him failed. Teachers failed. Doctors failed. His family and people who knew him failed. Society helped create him through negligence. That is an uncomfortable thought.

    • Tinyfaeri

      Awesome! Start a Pre-Crimes Division! It worked so well in that movie. Who’s the judge of whether or not someone will become a mass shooter? Who says whether they should be removed from society? Where do we put them? For what crime? For how long?
      You can’t spot these people ahead of time, you can’t predict them and I don’t care how early you “catch” them, you can’t fix them. Society does not create psychopaths, they’re born. Insisting otherwise is dangerous.
      I won’t be back to this post, I’m done.

    • Gangle

      I’m sorry you had to resort to pulling science fiction references (and the term ‘pre-crime’ originated in a short story by Philip K Dick, not ‘that movie’ just so you know). And no, severely mentally damaged people shouldn’t be ‘locked up’ for a crime. Perhaps the parents that abused and created them should though. No, perhaps they need to be taken and given proper care and treatment. Monitored. Not just for society, but because I believe every individual deserves medical and mental health care. For how long? Well, how long is a piece of string? For as long as they need mental health care and treatment.
      And while you can argue that society does not create psychopaths, it sure does allow them the platform. Hitler, after all, did not just magically appear. He had a majority vote. Hitler was able to commit vile atrocities because society let him, not because he had weird monster powers. To think otherwise is very VERY dangerous.

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      FYI it’s not psychopathy, it’s sociopathy if you want to be scientific.

    • jack_sprat2

      Why not treat all children well?

    • http://www.facebook.com/houde.veronique Véronique Houde

      I didn’t know that you were a psychiatrist that had diagnosed Lanza as a sociopathic serial killer! Do tell, where did you learn so much about the inner functionings of this dead man in order to develop such a profound theory on whether or not, with better access to services, a crime like the one he committed might be prevented?

    • kims

      people have killed themselves as a result of being bullied. why is it so far a stretch to see someone react in this way as a result of being bullied?

    • Tinyfaeri

      Because killing yourself is a FAR FREAKING CRY from arbitrarily killing 20 children under the age of 10 and 7 adults – one is private and messy and leaves a wake of damage on your immediate family and friends, and the other destroys 27 families in the most public way possible. Also, having known several victims of bullying, I refuse to believe that all bullying victims are time bombs waiting to go off. Bullying was likely a sad, horrible chapter in this person’s life, but it is neither an excuse nor a reason for shooting 20 children and 7 adults.

    • catherine

      I was bullied. I was suicidal over it. It caused my mental illness. I am on SSI for it. I never took my own life. But if I ever did take my own life..I would have taken someone out with me. I’ll make the news. I won’t die for nothing. I won’t let them just hurt me and laugh and I die and they don’t pay for it.

    • http://www.facebook.com/dominic.blais.5 Dominic Blais

      girls start dating the smart guys would be a huge help instead of leaving them going why do all the girls hate me for being smart and nice but bad at sports

    • http://www.facebook.com/dominic.blais.5 Dominic Blais

      most bullys are bullied by their fathers who where bullies in school too both playing fag ball taught to abuse others

    • autismparent

      Wow. “Blaming” a mentally ill person to make yourselves feel better, like all he needed was some good discipline when he was a kid, is truly moronic. It is like kicking your dog for not learning to speak english when you repeat the words to him over and over. It is quite clear Adam not only had autism, but likely an undiagnosed schizophrenia, or associative disorder. Adam did fail society by this heinous act, but no matter what we do about guns, etc this WILL happen again (the frequency of school shootings is close to constant over 40 years). Why? Because we dont do anything to help and treat out mentally ill kids. We throw then into schools where they are beaten, tortured, and bullied, and when their illness blossoms untreated we are surprised what happens? His mom knew, but didnt have the help and resources (because there are no places for mentally ill kids to go). Adam didnt ever learn the tools to manage his anger and get the medications that could have prevented this. The school knew there was a problem years before, mom knew, the community knew, and what did they do? Nothing, except ignore the bullying, not get the kid and the family help. Other kids WILL die in these situations until we reform the way we identify, and treat mentally ill kids. No amount of gun control will solve this, and no amount of “proper childraising” by all you perfect parents will fix a mentally ill child. The issue is right there. Those of you who dont act and help have no right to bitch about the next shooting, because all of you who stand by are partially responsible.

    • Gangle

      I hear what you are saying and I agree. I think a lot of people are missing the point – Bullying didn’t directly cause the terrible massacre of innocents… but it did directly contribute to a mental state that was obviously already traumatized. When he was vulnerable society failed. His school ignored it and did nothing. His mother possibly did not do enough. His doctor missed the signs too.
      This does not mean that his monstrous actions are in any way justifiable… but could they have been avoided?
      If the right people were paying attention, perhaps some of the trauma that lead to such a sick mind could have been avoided, perhaps the warning signs could have been spotted early enough, and he could have been treated, safely, in an institution or similar.
      I don’t believe anyone is just inherently good or evil. I don’t think violent killers come from nowhere. I do believe there are damaged, broken people who slip through the cracks and miss receiving the mental and physical health care they need. And I do believe there are always signs, we just either choose to ignore them, or we don’t know what they are.

  • Andrea

    And this somehow excuses what he did??? Those precious children weren’t even alive when that happened!!!

    And that is assuming that I even believe what this “relative” is saying. “Fiercely protective”?? Really? Is that why she kept an arsenal of weapons where her obviously disturbed child could get to them? Phu-lease.

    I say the same thing now that I said when this senseless tragedy happened: I lay it all (ALL OF IT) at Mrs Lanza’s feet.

    • Annie
    • Andrea

      Yup I read that blog. The mother in THAT blog is completely different from Nancy. The mother in that blog is NOT keeping an arsenal of weapons at her disturbed son’s disposal. She is living a nightmare.

    • Jessie

      “There, but for the grace of God, go I.”

      Or, hope you never have to deal with a special needs child that was bullied mercilessly.

  • Tinyfaeri

    4 months after the shooting, the shooter’s dead, and still blog posts and news articles about the killer. Way to reinforce that the best way to deal with past abuse is to go out and shoot a lot of people – whether you’re alive or dead at the end of it, you’ll always be remembered! For once, let’s just let the shooter fade from memory and keep the victim’s names and lives in the spotlight. They should matter more than their killer.

    http://www.wptv.com/gallery/news/news_photo_gallery/sandy-hook-victims-names-list-photos-bios

    • Annie

      Sweeping it under the carpet is how this tragedy keeps repeating itself. The behavior must be studied with a fine tooth comb not just by professionals but by the public, us, as well, if we want to prevent it from happening within our grasp.

    • http://www.facebook.com/paul.white.3532507 Paul White

      You think they haven’t studied the other mass shooters thoroughly? You think this sort of media coverage counts as studying?

    • Annie

      I do, as this is a problem we’re seeing too much of. As a people, I think we should be kicking and screaming until something is done.

    • Gangle

      I don’t think “they” have done anywhere near enough. Do you?

    • http://www.facebook.com/paul.white.3532507 Paul White

      The FBI has profiled the shooters to hell and back. They’ve done as much as can be done to determine commonalities.

    • Gangle

      Profiling them to hell and back.. great. And then what? Profilers have figured out that mental illness/neurological disorders left untreated coupled with an abusive upbringing has an awful lot to do with making sociopathic killers. So what now? File it away until the next killing? If that is a sign of a job well done, then we have different ideas of what enough is.

    • Columbine family

      The FBI did not profile the Columbine shooters correctly. The written motive is revenge for the January Incident. Show me where they investigated the January Incident. Google Columbine family request

    • Gangle

      By that reasoning, should we forget Hitler? Should we just let him fade, forget what he did, stop examining what happened? Or should we keep Hitler somewhere in our heads, in the hope that we can try and never allow anyone the sort of platform to do what he did ever ever again?

  • Blueathena623

    I wonder how much stock to put in this. Looking at the original article, all of this is coming from a relative. However, linked to that very article is another article about the mom’s emails where she says that Adam is doing well at sandy hook elementary school. With so much speculation, why did it take this relative (which one? How distantly related?” to produce this information?

  • A-nony-mous

    Be that as it may, I still believe the mother is the focus and cause for much of it. The fact he killed her first seems to suggest a lot of rage at her and I think more rage than just what he might have felt from her not protecting him from the school bullying. I think there was a lot of personal problems at home.

    Second to the fact that she took her clearly mentally disturbed son to gun ranges and thought it was a great idea to not only teach him to shoot at all but then to back that up by keeping an arsenal of weapons in the house with him. I understand that they may have struggled to find things that they connected and could do together but there is zero excuse for letting that be the one thing they did. I would rather never speak to my son again than teach him to use and keep weapons at the house if I knew he was that disturbed (and she was quite aware of his myriad of mental issues).

    I don’t believe he was capable of getting guns on his own. I believe if she hadn’t been an idiot about the guns then the incident wouldn’t have happened or at least he might’ve taken his rage out in a different way — on adults and/or been able to be subdued much faster with lesser weapons.

  • Tusconian

    They said the same thing about the kids who did Columbine (and even passing up the fact that that was propaganda, as those kids were actually vicious little bullies themselves), and I never like hearing it. People bullied WAY more than Lanza have managed to live healthy, productive lives, instead of heartlessly massacring dozens of innocent kids. The issue isn’t bullying, or about 95% of people who made it through a few years of school would be gunning people down left and right. If this was just about bullies, a 20 year old man who hadn’t been to the
    school for nearly a decade would not have taken it out on children who
    weren’t even thought of when he was going through his problems, school
    shooters still at school wouldn’t try to blow the whole school up or
    sweep the halls with bullets killing indicriminately. The rhetoric has been trendy ever since the (again, completely false) notion that Harris and Klebold were tortured little victims, terrorized to the edge by jocks and beauty queens, and it’s a lazy notion. It’s an excuse to blame children for problems that adults ignore, or even more frighteningly, situations that might not have been prevented. Adults do not want to admit that they are the ones who are responsible for preventing bullying, for taking care of their childrens’ mental health, for simply paying attention to their children and their students. And adults and children alike do not want to admit that they live in a world where bad things can still happen despite anti-bullying campaigns, mental health measures, and good parenting. I’m all for taking measures to lower the rates of violent bullying, but we have got to stop making excuses for people, or saying that it’s easier to understand people, because they had a rough time in school. Worse than lazy, it’s shifting the blame from passive adults who should have known better to children who a) were too young to understand any consequences of their actions without adult guidance, and b) did not involve the bullies anyway.

    • Columbine Family

      The Columbine shooters were raped during an arrest. According to a you tube posted by Lanza prior to the tragedy, Lanza was also a victim of pedophilia. We believe that he was a Columbine copycat. Google Columbine family request. The Columbine shooters were also on psychotropic drugs as are 90% of mass murderers.

    • http://itsmyworldcanthasnotyours.blogspot.com/ wmdkitty

      [Citation Needed] on ALL of those claims.

    • Columbine Family
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  • http://www.facebook.com/dominic.blais.5 Dominic Blais

    school gun violence could be prevented by a blow job i bet why does no one ask how the girls treated them

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  • ohwow

    Called it. Of course there are some people who are inherently evil–just born twisted. But I felt there was more to this particular story. I remember when it came out, I told my friends “something must have happened to him at Sandy Hook.” I would never condone Adam Lanza’s actions, ever–he was a very sick man who committed heinous acts. But bullying goes on every day and it’s rare to find a school that handles it in the right way. It’s either ignored or minimised in most cases. Everyone deals with bullying differently. Some people become withdrawn,
    some become suicidal. Some get belligerent and some become sadistic. Are we honestly surprised that SOMEONE would snap? Whatever happened here, whether or not Adam Lanza’s story could have been different, it is always horrible to hear of a child being hurt and the system not giving a damn. THAT is what needs to change.

    Veronique Houde, I love your story.

  • ohwow

    Called it. Of course there are some people who are inherently evil–just born twisted. But I felt there was more to this particular story. I remember when it came out, I told my friends “something must have happened to him at Sandy Hook.” I would never condone Adam Lanza’s actions, ever–he was a very sick man who committed heinous acts. But bullying goes on every day and it’s rare to find a school that handles it in the right way. It’s either ignored or minimised in most cases. Everyone deals with bullying differently. Some people become withdrawn,
    some become suicidal. Some get belligerent and some become sadistic. Are we honestly surprised that SOMEONE would snap? Whatever happened here, whether or not Adam Lanza’s story could have been different, it is always horrible to hear of a child being hurt and the system not giving a damn. THAT is what needs to change.

    Veronique Houde, I love your story.

  • Sam

    It’s so sad how things turned out like this. I was in his shoes growing up, not exactly, but I suffered from immense amounts of bullying from not just my peers, but from teachers as well. The school never did anything about it, and my mom would go up there, and it almost got to the point of us suing the school district for their neglect. I was extremely emotional growing up, and also suffered from what I was later diagnosed with bipolar.

    If people would just take the time to try to understand people, rather than mark them off as weird or irrelevant, then these sort of incidents wouldn’t occur. I honestly feel bad, not just for the families because what they went through was absolutely awful and something no family should ever be put through, but I also feel sorry for Adam Lanza. From what I read it seems like his school gave up on him, which caused more students to bully him which caused him to have more emotional problems, and other mental disabilities that was stated.

    Before I get chewed out for saying that I feel sorry for him, I would like to point out that I do not think that what he did was right. I feel that it could have been prevented if someone other than his mother had shown some interest in his well being. His mother was obviously fighting an already losing battle with the school, and that had to have made him lose his faith in society to the point of doing something like this. These sort of events are just so awful.