shutterstock_80769547Parents, if your kid wanders into the kitchen this winter break and asks you where you keep the cinnamon and marshmallows, they don’t want to make sweet potato pie or a fancy hot chocolate. They are planning on using these items to get super ‘efffffffffed up and then possibly post the video on You Tube. Or invite their friends over for some spice rack shenanigans. But they are definitely not planning on making a snack! And if they are planning on making a snack, it’s going to be a super dangerous yuletide snack that will mess them up for life. As responsible parents, we need to be fully aware of this baking supply menace and safeguard our children and teens from the hidden dangers of toxic treats. From Web Md:

“A lot of these spices and household products are around all year. But during the holidays, kids are out of school. So they have less structure and may spend more time on the Internet, where they can learn about choking games and other ways to get high,” says Christina Hantsch, MD, of Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill.

“There is always something new out there. So parents have to educate themselves and their children and have a relationship where they can talk about things they have heard of that may very well be risky.”

Oh man, I am kinda excited about sitting down with my kids and lecturing the about the dangers of pulling dumbass stunts with marshmallows they may have seen on the Internet. One of the many joys I get out of parenting is lecturing my kids about bizarre shit I read  and watching them act like I have lost my damn mind. Like when the video game system spams them with the warning that they should take a break I always get real dramatic about it and turn the TV off and make them lie down and close their eyes and guide them through absurd relaxation visualizations just to mess with them.

Hantsch says the emergency room at her hospital saw 12 preteen kids who took the “cinnamon challenge.” During this challenge, kids swallow cinnamon without any water. This results in a cough and burning sensation that can lead to breathing issues and choking.

Videos of the cinnamon challenge on the Internet have gone viral, which is why it is increasing in popularity. In 2011, poison centers in the U.S. received 51 calls about exposure to cinnamon among teens. In the first three months of 2012, they received 139 calls, she says.

In the first three months of 2012. No kid is doing this anymore, and if they are, you need to be more concerned with the fact your kid can’t get with the times and they are participating in a trend that is almost a year old.

The “chubby bunny” marshmallow challenge has similar risks. In this game, kids stuff as many marshmallows into their mouth as they can, and try to say “chubby bunny.” Two kids choked to death during this game.

 

It’s very sad that this caused two kids to die. It’s hard for me to make fun of this because kids dying makes me terribly sad. But CHUBBY BUNNY! This risky game is seriously called CHUBBY BUNNY. I don’t know, I guess if your kids are hell bent on doing this you could tell them the actual game involves showing marshmallows down their pants and saying CHUBBY BUNNY. I actually do childproof my marshmallows, because if I don’t the kids feed them to do the dog because he goes batshit over marshmallows and barfs all over and then I have to clean it up.

The article goes on to state that smoke kids smoke nutmeg, but these kids are not our kids because as every parent knows you need like three tablespoons and nutmeg is like five bucks for a few ounces. Besides, we used it all in egg nog. The article also states that your kids are just engaging in this “risky” behavior because they are off of school and bored. You know how to make a kid un-bored? Hand them a damn shovel.

(photo: auremar/shutterstock)